Glycine May Treat Hearing Issues Caused By NSAID (aspirin?)

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    It is common knowledge that several NASID drugs, including aspirin, cause hearing issues at higher doses. This new research found that the mechanism of action is by competition with chloride ions for activation of the hearing protein called prestin. This suggests a possible method of blocking and reversing the issue by either increasing the chloride ion supply through extra salt, or using supplements that activate the chloride channel. The most potent OTC supplement acting as chloride channel activator is glycine.
    Finally, as an interesting side note, of all the NSAID drugs tested aspirin was the only drug that did NOT interfere with the protein prestin. This would suggest that aspirin does not cause hearing issues but I think the dosage if the key as aspirin had wel-documented ototoxicity in doses exceeding 4g daily. Also, I posted another study showing large doses of aspirin deplete glycine stores, and given glycine's role as a chloride channel activator I think this is too much of a coincidence to ignore. But the good news is that in doses commonly used by most people, aspirin is the least hearing-damaging drug of all NSAIDs.

    Diflunisal inhibits prestin by chloride-dependent mechanism
    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-09-aspirin-like-pain-reliever-diflunisal-blocks.html

    "...The research, which is available online in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, stemmed from a 2015 Rice study that screened more than a half-dozen nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, for possible interactions with the protein prestin. Prestin is a highly specialized protein that drives the action of outer hair cells in the cochlea, an inner-ear organ that allows people and animals to hear. Taking too much aspirin can cause temporary deafness, and researchers discovered more than a decade ago that this happens because salicylate, one of the primary metabolites of aspirin, interferes with prestin," said study lead author Guillaume Duret, a research scientist in Rice's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. "Given the number of commonly used NSAIDs that operate in a similar way to aspirin, it seemed like a good idea to find out whether they also might inhibit prestin. Duret said diflunisal was the only drug in the test that blocked the action of prestin. He said the findings suggest that the inhibition occurs by competing with chloride ions in prestin, a mechanism that is similar to what has been proposed for salicylate. The study also found that the dosage needed to induce a reaction was less than the aspirin dose required to induce a similar reaction."
     
  2. Lucenzo01

    Lucenzo01 Member

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    I always got bad reactions from glycine. The only thing that makes aspirin useful for me is caffeine and viceversa. Pretty curious combo and synergiy.
     
  3. Mage

    Mage Member

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    Hey haidut, how can we get sufficient glycine without unknowingly be exposing ourselves to glyphosate?
     
  4. tca300

    tca300 Member

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    Holy smokes! Thank you for mentioning that. I didnt know. It seems a good quality glycine supplement with a provided certificate of analysis might be the way to go, unless you have access to organic grass fed gelatin, which still might be contaminated.
     
  5. AretnaP

    AretnaP Member

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    haidut is glycine's anti-inflammatory power as strong as aspirin?
    how about it's anti-excitotoxic property?
     
  6. Mage

    Mage Member

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    You're welcome bro!

    I guess it's either great lakes or nothing at all... As an alternative, investing in other glycine rich foods is better than buying some cheap ass gelatin. Or maybe even supplementing pure glycine?

    Do you guys know more or less how many grams of glycine should we be eating?
     
  7. Diokine

    Diokine Member

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    So are you saying that glycine supplements may be contaminated with glyphosate? Is it because glyphosate can be substituted for glycine during protein synthesis?

    I've been using the NOW foods pure glycine powder, and it seems to be good. It's advertised as pharmaceutical grade.
     
  8. tca300

    tca300 Member

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    No, animal foods containing glycine.
    The animal ingests it, and incorporates it into its structure where glycine should be ( because they are similar enough in structure the organism doesnt really know the difference ) and therefore because gelatin and gelatinous foods are high in glycine, you might be getting a food thats actually high in glyphosate.
    Clean, verified glycine supplements should be ok, but might pose other problems... who knows.
     
  9. Mage

    Mage Member

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    I wonder what would be better, great lakes gelatin (they state to have no glyphosate in their product) or pure glycine..
     
  10. Diokine

    Diokine Member

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    Interesting - I've used knox gelatin before and it never really sat right with me. It always seemed to seriously irritate my gut. I recently tried the bulletproof collagen powder, and it was better but I'm still getting the intuition that it's not right.
     
  11. tca300

    tca300 Member

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    If they are being honest and are 100% sure, then that would probably be preferable. I wonder how they know for sure.

    It looks like they ( great lakes ) just test for it as a contaminant in their gelatin, as appose to actually seeing if the glyphosate is replacing glycine in the protein itself.
     
  12. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    I wouldn't use pure amin0s given a choice, as Ray has advised against it
     
  13. Terma

    Terma Member

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    The ototoxicity is the #1 reason I limit/spread my aspirin intake. I had tinnitus real bad after another drug, and it cured itself, so I'd be a massive moron to push my luck.

    I keep reading it's not that bad, but if I try to take aspirin daily at regular doses I still notice some tinnitus even with glycine, minerals, taurine, K2.

    I haven't tried very high NaCl doses because that leads to other issues every time.

    Sounds like progress but I'm waiting for the day the exact mechanism of aspirin tinnitus is known and preventable guaranteed.
     
  14. Dobbler

    Dobbler Member

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    Im using normal grocery store gelatin from pork skin. Dr oetker is the brand. Is it safe? Its cheap and easy to buy, unlike great lakes.
     
  15. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Gelatin should do it, as I don't think it is contaminated with glyphosate.
     
  16. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Probably depends on the dose, but they have very similar effects.
     
  17. Sativa

    Sativa Member

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    Insight as to how salicylate induces tinnitus...

    Salicylate enables cochlear arachidonic-acid-sensitive NMDA receptor responses.
    Abstract
    Currently, many millions of people treated for various ailments receive high doses of salicylate.
    Consequently, understanding the mechanisms by which salicylate induces tinnitus is an important issue for the research community. Behavioral testing in rats have shown that tinnitus induced by salicylate or mefenamate (both cyclooxygenase blockers) are mediated by cochlear NMDA receptors. Here we report that the synapses between the sensory inner hair cells and the dendrites of the cochlear spiral ganglion neurons express NMDA receptors. Patch-clamp recordings and two-photon calcium imaging demonstrated that salicylate and arachidonate (a substrate of cyclooxygenase) enabled the calcium flux and the neural excitatory effects of NMDA on cochlear spiral ganglion neurons. Salicylate also increased the arachidonate content of the whole cochlea in vivo. Single-unit recordings of auditory nerve fibers in adult guinea pig confirmed the neural excitatory effect of salicylate and the blockade of this effect by NMDA antagonist.
    These results suggest that salicylate inhibits cochlear cyclooxygenase, which increased levels of arachidonate. The increased levels of arachidonate then act on NMDA receptors to enable NMDA responses to glutamate that inner hair cells spontaneously release. This new pharmacological profile of salicylate provides a molecular mechanism for the generation of tinnitus at the periphery of the auditory system.
     
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