Glucose Has A Sleep Promoting Effect

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Oct 1, 2015.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    I will post another study immediately after that showing that glucose activates the glycine receptors. This study did not look at receptors but did find that glucose stimulated the sleep-promoting neurons in the brain. So, the sleepiness effect many people on the forum are reporting after sugar intake may be due to this property of glucose. So, the advice to eat sugary and salty food before bed seems quite legit.

    http://www.researchgate.net/publication ... Metabolism

    "...Sleep-active neurons located in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) play a crucial role in the induction and maintenance of slow-wave sleep (SWS). However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for their activation at sleep onset remain poorly understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that a rise in extracellular glucose concentration in the VLPO can promote sleep by increasing the activity of sleep-promoting VLPO neurons. We find that infusion of a glucose concentration into the VLPO of mice promotes SWS and increases the density of c-Fos-labeled neurons selectively in the VLPO. Moreover, we show in patch-clamp recordings from brain slices that VLPO neurons exhibiting properties of sleep-promoting neurons are selectively excited by glucose within physiological range. This glucose-induced excitation implies the catabolism of glucose, leading to a closure of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. The extracellular glucose concentration monitors the gating of KATP channels of sleep-promoting neurons, highlighting that these neurons can adapt their excitability according to the extracellular energy status. Together, these results provide evidence that glucose may participate in the mechanisms of SWS promotion and/or consolidation."
     
  2. Mateo Wiechers

    Mateo Wiechers Member

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    I too get very sleepy after sugar intake, specially in the mornings. I read that high blood glucose inhibit Orexin neurons.
    What can you do during the active hours of the day to avoid the sleepiness effect of Glucose?...I read that Sistemic Inflammation potentiates the glucose-induced supression of Orexin Neurons, causing fatigue after meals.
     
  3. Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    Ahh... so this must explain why having gelatin with sugar is such a good idea. I usually struggle with nightly awakenings. I have been having big batches of jello (glucose and glycine) now at night, and often sleep 6 hours uninterrupted now.
     
  4. hotte

    hotte Member

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    What amount of glucose you are taking before going to bed?
     
  5. Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    I don't recommend you copy me really since I have a lot, as I'm still healing from hypo.

    But, to answer your question, the portion I have from jello is 3.5 cup OJ, 1/4-1/2 cup honey, 4 TBSP of gelatin alongside 2 tbsp of hydrogenated coconut oil and actually that is generally on top of some other calories I had not long before also. I need a lot of food to keep glucose stores topped off.
     
  6. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Please ask these questions to everybody and not just me. When you quote my responses, nobody else chimes in because they assume this is a question only for me. The purpose of the forum is that more than one person participates.
     
  7. Mateo Wiechers

    Mateo Wiechers Member

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    Sorry i didn't know the dinamics of the forum. Here is again the question for anyone who may have an insight:

    What can you do during the active hours of the day to avoid the sleepiness effect of Glucose?...I read that Sistemic Inflammation potentiates the glucose-induced supression of Orexin Neurons, causing fatigue after meals.
     
  8. Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    Fatigue after meals is really not the fault of glucose but the fault of the person who is ingesting... could be anything from overall pre-existing inflammation, endotoxin, insulin-resistance, randle cycle interactions, not enough fructose with the glucose... etc. Though this can also happen if the food is of poor quality (improperly prepared starches for example). Sugar is considered superior to starch. I think part of that is because fructose can be helpful. I believe fructose and glucose are synergestic with each other and neither should probably be taken in exclusion to the other. I feel bad if my fructose:glucose ratio sways too far from a 1:1 ratio. I am not sure how milk sugar plays into this dynamic. I honestly probably have pretty close to a 1 : 1 : 1 fructose, glucose, lactose ratio.

    Also, generally you should probably have at least some protein with carbs. I believe I saw a study posted a while back here that showed that eating carbohydrates alone may cause a rise in serotonin, but this effect was blunted when coupled with protein. Once again, a synergy. Because eating protein alone is a bad idea also - this will tank your blood sugar.
     
  9. Mateo Wiechers

    Mateo Wiechers Member

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    Yes. Having Protein with the carbs certainly helps. It reduces the Tryptophan/LNAA ratio and that lowers serotonin. I Will try some Aspirin with breakfast and see if it reduce the sleepiness.
     
  10. Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    Ahhh... sleepy after breakfast, that is an important key. A lot of people get sleepy after breakfast. This is because of being stressed throughout the night, waking up from adrenaline, and then eating a quality breakfast will shut off the adrenaline putting you out like a light. A common occurrence, something I sometimes battle with also.
     
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