Ginger Is A Seratonin Antagonist?

Discussion in 'Diet, Recipes' started by javacody, Jul 13, 2015.

  1. javacody

    javacody Member

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  2. answersfound

    answersfound Member

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    It certainly is! But in my opinion it tastes awful. There are other ways to attack serotonin.
     
  3. OP
    javacody

    javacody Member

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    You can get ginger in supplemental form, drink ginger ale or ginger tea, use it in cooking, etc.

    Anytime I can get good effects from foods, I prefer to go that route.

    Ginger is also really good for digestion.

    I'm also curious as to the amount of ginger required.
     
  4. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    I think it also has agonist activity if I remember correctly.
     
  5. Makrosky

    Makrosky Member

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    IIRC, the info you need is already posted somewhere in this forum.
     
  6. OP
    javacody

    javacody Member

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    I did a search and didn't see anything pertinent in the first few pages.

    I'll dig a bit further.
     
  7. Makrosky

    Makrosky Member

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    viewtopic.php?t=4127#p50055
     
  8. OP
    javacody

    javacody Member

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    Perfect. Thanks!
     
  9. Peata

    Peata Member

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    I take ginger capsules pretty much everyday now. They really helped me out a year ago when I was having lightheadedness an stomach problem. Lately I take them in the morning to help with nausea, and during day if needed. I wish I'd known to take it years ago. I used to suffer with "morning sickness" pretty much every morning. It's something that actually has no side effect at all for me, just seems to do good things.

    My only concern is whether it's estrogenic, so if anyone knows, would be helpful. Thanks.
     
  10. OP
    javacody

    javacody Member

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    My teenage son eats like a horse and ginger really helps him avoid any stomach issues.

    I'm curious about estrogen as well.
     
  11. Dan Wich

    Dan Wich Member

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    I've been using ginger for a while to make beef liver taste not-terrible, and because of the anti-serotonin effects.

    The possible estrogenicity and increase in FSH are the potential downsides I've come across. But that same study suggests it might increase testosterone in men, and it could also lower NO.

    For my purposes, I figure the good outweighs the bad. Especially since it helps my taste buds believe that liver isn't evil.
     
  12. tara

    tara Member

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    I love the taste of ginger.
    I include ginger root with other veges in soups.
    And keep crystalised ginger in the car for emergency driver fuel.
    I haven't yet got a suitable juicer/grater so I can add fresh juice to foods - one day.
     
  13. Stuart

    Stuart Member

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    Re liver being evll. In Australia we can buy dried beef liver dog treats (just liver - no additives whatsoever, not even salt) very cheaply They smash up in an electic spice mill/coffee grinder to very small particles. Almost a powder. I don't like the taste of cooked liver, but I find these granules taste pretty good. And being such small particles you can lose them in any other food - even O.J.
    Perhaps you can buy them in the U.S. too.
     
  14. livrepensador

    livrepensador Member

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    Im curious too!
    And i did some research but i´m not a scientist and because of that i never know whats the best studies to rely on :?

    But i saw some people in another forum discussing the effects on ginger and that really caught my attention:


    Iranian Journal of Reproductive Medicine, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2009, pp. 7-12
    en The effects of Ginger on spermatogenesis and sperm parameters of rat
    Khaki, Arash; Fathiazad, Fatemeh; Nouri, Mohammad; Khaki, Amir Afshin; Ozanci, Chelar C; Ghafari-Novin, Marefat & Hamadeh, Mohammad
    Abstract

    Background: Ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale R., family: Zingiberaceae) is used medicinally and as a culinary spice.
    Objective: Medicinal use of ginger dates back to ancient China and India. Ginger and its constituents are stated to have antiemetic, antithrombotic, antihepatotoxic, anti-inflammatory, stimulant, cholagogue and antioxidant. It has been used since ancient time as medicinal and food origins it contain antioxidative and androgenic activities and have well effect in diseases treatment in more countries world-wide. As an antioxidantâ??s ginger has a useful effect on spermatogenesis and sperm parameters.

    Materials and Methods: Wistar male rat (n=30) were allocated into three groups, control (n=10) and test groups (n=20), that subdivided into groups of 2 that received ginger rhizome powder (50 and 100mg/kg/day) for 20 consequence day. Animals were kept in standard conditions. In twentieth day the testes tissue of Rats in whole groups were removed and sperm was collected from epididymis and prepared for analysis.

    Results: Serum total testosterones significantly increased in experimental group that has received 100 mg/kg/day Ginger (p<0.05) in comparison to control group. Besides, the percentage of sperm viability and motility in both test groups significantly increased (p<0.05) in comparison to control group, Whereas, LH, FSH hormones, sperm concentration, morphology and testes weights in both experimental and control group were similar.

    Conclusion: Results revealed that administration of 100 mg/kg/day of ginger significantly increased sperm percentage, viability, motility and serum total testosterones. This suggested that ginger may be promising in enhancing sperm healthy parameters.

    Sperm motolity more than doubled
    Sperm viability up by 50%
    Sperm count up by approx 30%
    Total T more than doubled



    Is it correct? Could someone with science knowledge confirm this?

    Btw, this is the thread: http://tnation.t-nation.com/free_online ... _by_ginger

    They link this site too: http://ergo-log.com/gingertest.html

    Thanks!
     
  15. aguilaroja

    aguilaroja Member

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    Ginger apparently reduces serotonin signaling in the gut, which is one explanation of its anti-nausea effects. However, ginger is a partial agonist at the 5-HT1 receptor site for serotonin. Of course, researchers speculate the the possible serotonin raising aspect of ginger may account for its reported depression and anxiety relieving actions in animal research.

    Ginger has an additive effect with ondasetron, so its serotonin-lowering action may differ somewhat.

    The 10-gingerol component of ginger appears to reduce neuro-inflammation, in part by lowering nitric oxide, TNF-α, and Interleukins IL-1β, IL-6. Ginger has anti-inflammation properties, in part attributed to its lowering of nitric oxide.

    Ginger also appears to protect against lipid peroxidation in animal studies. It's interesting that one study found no acute toxicity of ginger up to 1500 mg/kg body weight in mice (the equivalent of more than 75 GRAMS of ginger extract in humans). Several studies have shown ginger components protect against radiation damage in lab animals.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24757377
    Ginger and its pungent constituents non-competitively inhibit serotonin currents on visceral afferent neurons.
    Jin Z1, Lee G1, Kim S1, Park CS2, Park YS2, Jin YH1.
    Korean J Physiol Pharmacol. 2014 Apr;18(2):149-53. doi: 10.4196/kjpp.2014.18.2.149.
    "The ginger extract has similar effects to antiemetic drug ondansetron by blocking 5-HT-evoked responses. Pungent constituents of the ginger, [6]-shogaol, [6]-gingerol, and zingerone inhibited 5-HT responses in a dose dependent manner."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23490018
    Ginger and its pungent constituents non-competitively inhibit activation of human recombinant and native 5-HT3 receptors of enteric neurons.
    Walstab J1, Krüger D, Stark T, Hofmann T, Demir IE, Ceyhan GO, Feistel B, Schemann M, Niesler B.
    Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2013 May;25(5):439-47, e302. doi: 10.1111/nmo.12107. Epub 2013 Mar 12.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24497743
    The efficacy of ginger added to ondansetron for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting in ambulatory surgery.
    Mandal P1, Das A2, Majumdar S3, Bhattacharyya T2, Mitra T4, Kundu R5.
    Pharmacognosy Res. 2014 Jan;6(1):52-7. doi: 10.4103/0974-8490.122918.

    "Prophylactic administration of ginger and ondansetron significantly reduced the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting compared to ondansetron alone in patients undergoing day care surgery under general anaesthesia."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23871076
    Anti-neuroinflammatory capacity of fresh ginger is attributed mainly to 10-gingerol.
    Ho SC1, Chang KS, Lin CC.
    Food Chem. 2013 Dec 1;141(3):3183-91. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.06.010. Epub 2013 Jun 11.
    "...other gingerols and shogaols at a concentration of 20 μM inhibited the production of nitric oxide, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α as well as their mRNA levels in LPS-activated BV2 microglia."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20136450
    Anti-inflammatory properties of red ginger (Zingiber officinale var. Rubra) extract and suppression of nitric oxide production by its constituents.
    Shimoda H1, Shan SJ, Tanaka J, Seki A, Seo JW, Kasajima N, Tamura S, Ke Y, Murakami N.
    J Med Food. 2010 Feb;13(1):156-62. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2009.1084.
    "Consequently, we found a potent suppressive effect of RGE on acute and chronic inflammation, and inhibition of macrophage activation seems to be involved in this anti-inflammatory effect. [6]-Shogaol, gingerdiols, and proanthocyanidins were identified as constituents that inhibited NO production."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23875904
    Aqueous extracts of two varieties of ginger (Zingiber officinale) inhibit angiotensin I-converting enzyme, iron(II), and sodium nitroprusside-induced lipid peroxidation in the rat heart in vitro.
    Akinyemi AJ1, Ademiluyi AO, Oboh G.
    J Med Food. 2013 Jul;16(7):641-6. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2012.0022.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15453957
    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.), a dietary supplement, protects mice against radiation-induced lethality: mechanism of action.
    Jagetia G1, Baliga M, Venkatesh P.
    Cancer Biother Radiopharm. 2004 Aug;19(4):422-35.
    "The irradiation of animals resulted in a dose-dependent elevation in the lipid peroxidation, while depletion in the glutathione (GSH) contents occurred on day 31 postirradiation. Treatment of mice with ZOE before irradiation caused a significant depletion in lipid peroxidation followed by a significant elevation in GSH concentration in the livers of mice at 31 days postirradiation."
    "The drug was nontoxic up to a dose of 1500 mg/kg body weight, the highest drug dose that could be tested for acute toxicity."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22596078
    Food Funct. 2012 Jul;3(7):714-23. doi: 10.1039/c2fo10225k. Epub 2012 May 18.
    Radioprotective effects of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger): past, present and future.
    Baliga MS1, Haniadka R, Pereira MM, Thilakchand KR, Rao S, Arora R.
     
  16. livrepensador

    livrepensador Member

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    Thak you so much aguilaroja !!!
    Do you think its wise to take ginger to reduce inflamation and to low serotonin ?
     
  17. Makrosky

    Makrosky Member

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    It can't harm juicing some ginger and trying it. A tsp of the juice IIRC. If you are trained detecting serotonin and it does something to you, you'll notice it.

    I tried it two months ago but took a Tbsp instead of a tsp and it reduced anxiety indeed but left me with a terrible headache. The taste is so disgusting I had no desire to repeat the experiment ever again, neither with much smaller doses. I ran to the pharmacy and bought some cyproheptadine.

    Btw, I'm talking about fresh juice, not dried powder or ginger tea. I like ginger tea.
     
  18. livrepensador

    livrepensador Member

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    Thank you Makrosky! Im thinking about chop the ginger root add some water, lemon juice and sugar. Here in Brasil it´s a common drink. So i think i will test this night. Btw, im on vacation in my mother´s house and she said that a tea made of ginger and lemonbalm ( Melissa officinalis) is a good sleep aid. Let´s see what happens.

    Another question: how do you know when your serotonin is high?

    Thanks!
     
  19. Makrosky

    Makrosky Member

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    I can recall a paper (sorry I can't find it now) where ginger was compared with ondasteron. They used the juice, not an infusion like you said. The color of juice is bright yellow. The color of the tea is kind of brownish. So it's clearly different although the tea of course works.

    After playing with antiserotonin substances I learned what serotonin does to me. Or what I think it's serotonin, I don't know. Maybe it's better to call it serotonin/adrenalin/cortisol/aldosterone/etc because according to Peat they tend to go all together.

    In my case the three most noticeable effects of the pack are : agression, nervous pain in the abdominal area and general feeling of malaise. There are others.

    Call it whatever you want, serotonin or who knows bit that diminishes a lot with lysine, cypro, theanine, etc so that's what I figured out.
     
  20. Combie

    Combie Member

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    I use ginger tincture regularly and find that 5ml of a 1:3 product has a nice effect, warmth, calmness, settled guts. 10ml does all this but gives a headache. It does depend on the brand though.
     
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