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Gelatinous Low Histamine CHICKEN Bone Broth AND dinner in under 3 Hours (with photos)

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"It happens that gelatin is a protein which contains no tryptophan, and only small amounts of cysteine, methionine, and histidine. Using gelatin as a major dietary protein is an easy way to restrict the amino acids that are associated with many of the problems of aging."-Ray Peat

I really never knew that bone broth could ever be like jiggly jello without buying a gelatin packet or cooking it for 24+ hours. The bone broths in grocery stores certainly isn't gelatinous. Not to mention the oxalates in the store bought ones, from all the vegetables, can be problematic for people dealing with pain, and in large daily amounts can cause achiness in people who don't have any issues. Ray Peat says long cooked bone broths are high in histamines and heavy metals too, and I can attest to the heavy metals. I do not do well on any of them, especially the powdered ones. So sadly bone broths were not an option for me until last year. I knew there were times that I had made 3 and 4 hour stews that had gotten pretty thick without even bones, so I knew when Ray Peat says to keep bone broths cooking time to no more than 3 hours there had to be something to it. I now have it down!

First thing to know is bones do not make a gelatinous broth in a short amount of time, the cartilage and skin does. For a gelatinous chicken bone broth wings work best. I buy chicken necks too and like to throw in a few, in case there might be some traces of thyroid in them. I don't like to use chicken feet because they usually bleach them, and I don't like the taste of that in my broth. I tried it twice, and besides the taste, it is just too much seeing all those claws reaching out of the pot like a witches cauldron.

I like killing two birds with one stone, punn intended, so I only make my chicken bone broth at the same time as I make wings for dinner. So these instructions will make your broth and dinner at the same time. I always snip off the wing tips from my wings and freeze them, along with other saved chicken bones. So I have a good stash to start my bone broth and dinner with.

START:
1. Put leftover bones, like a small carcass or 4 of 5 cups of saved bones, in a BIG pot (I use Le Creuset) add wing tips (maybe 7 or 8 of them) and about 7 chicken necks (no vegetables or vinegar) and cover with filtered water (I use flouride free from my gravity filter) and blast up that heat leaving the lid off. You want the impurities to escape your broth. You will see how many there are in the sludge that rises at the beggining of the cooking time. If you had made your bone broth in a crock pot you would have eaten that, yuck! Cook for about an hour, skimming off that sludgy foam and replacing water if it goes below the bones.

2. While the bones are cooking have the wings soaking in water to remove any cloudines (I use about 3 to 4 pounds). Add in the wings to the broth a pound or so at a time, cook for 20 minutes and transfer to a foil lined, and coconut oil greased, baking sheet. Cook all of the wings in the same manner. When the wings are all cooked continue cooking the chicken broth on very high heat, with the lid off until 3 hours is done, sometimes I will go 4 hours if the pot is low on bones. Keep replacing the water till the end.

3. Turn off the bone broth, cool slightly and strain through a metal sieve into a clean glass bowl, cover and refrigerate overnight. The next morning scrape off all the soft PUFA laden fat that rose to the top and toss it. At this point you can use the broth or freeze it for another time.

4. To finish the dinner wings, I rub down the wings with refined coconut oil, season them with garlic salt (or whatever sounds good depending on the sauce I might toss them in), then broil them skin side down on an upper rack for about 5 minutes, turn them over and finish broiling them till browned and crispy.

One thing to think about is, that with all the evaporation and added water, and whatever else that is in your water source, good and bad, is all going to get concentrated in your broth. So if you are using fluoridated water the concentrations are gonna get higher than just drinking water, but no different than store bought broth. So use the purest water possible. I like to use my chicken bone broth mostly to make a variety of soups, Asian Pho, eggdrop soup, creamy chicken gravy, homemade enchilada sauce, meatball sauces, and fresh mashed beans. My gelatinous beef broth is slightly different so I will post those instructions next.

 

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Philomath

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it is just too much seeing all those claws reaching out of the pot like a witches cauldron.
That’s hilarious! Thank you for posting these instructions! There are a lot of Ray Peat inspired recipes out there, but they really need videos or detailed instructions (like this).
Many are either difficult (Potato Juice Soup), have “unusual” tweaks - like boil times, or use atypical ingredients like the coconut oil ice cream.
@Rinse & rePeat, do you have a spot where all your recipes are aggregated?
 

fico

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Aug 13, 2020
Messages
291
And an "ASMR" Youtube video where the broth fat is removed, etc.
 

Rinse & rePeat

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Thread starter
Joined
Mar 10, 2021
Messages
8,131
That’s hilarious! Thank you for posting these instructions! There are a lot of Ray Peat inspired recipes out there, but they really need videos or detailed instructions (like this).
Many are either difficult (Potato Juice Soup), have “unusual” tweaks - like boil times, or use atypical ingredients like the coconut oil ice cream.
@Rinse & rePeat, do you have a spot where all your recipes are aggregated?
I don't! I have thought about it, but wouldn't know where to put them.
 

ALS

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Joined
Sep 3, 2017
Messages
99
"It happens that gelatin is a protein which contains no tryptophan, and only small amounts of cysteine, methionine, and histidine. Using gelatin as a major dietary protein is an easy way to restrict the amino acids that are associated with many of the problems of aging."-Ray Peat

I really never knew that bone broth could ever be like jiggly jello without buying a gelatin packet or cooking it for 24+ hours. The bone broths in grocery stores certainly isn't gelatinous. Not to mention the oxalates in the store bought ones, from all the vegetables, can be problematic for people dealing with pain, and in large daily amounts can cause achiness in people who don't have any issues. Ray Peat says long cooked bone broths are high in histamines and heavy metals too, and I can attest to the heavy metals. I do not do well on any of them, especially the powdered ones. So sadly bone broths were not an option for me until last year. I knew there were times that I had made 3 and 4 hour stews that had gotten pretty thick without even bones, so I knew when Ray Peat says to keep bone broths cooking time to no more than 3 hours there had to be something to it. I now have it down!

First thing to know is bones do not make a gelatinous broth in a short amount of time, the cartilage and skin does. For a gelatinous chicken bone broth wings work best. I buy chicken necks too and like to throw in a few, in case there might be some traces of thyroid in them. I don't like to use chicken feet because they usually bleach them, and I don't like the taste of that in my broth. I tried it twice, and besides the taste, it is just too much seeing all those claws reaching out of the pot like a witches cauldron.

I like killing two birds with one stone, punn intended, so I only make my chicken bone broth at the same time as I make wings for dinner. So these instructions will make your broth and dinner at the same time. I always snip off the wing tips from my wings and freeze them, along with other saved chicken bones. So I have a good stash to start my bone broth and dinner with.

START:
1. Put leftover bones, like a small carcass or 4 of 5 cups of saved bones, in a BIG pot (I use Le Creuset) add wing tips (maybe 7 or 8 of them) and about 7 chicken necks (no vegetables or vinegar) and cover with filtered water (I use flouride free from my gravity filter) and blast up that heat leaving the lid off. You want the impurities to escape your broth. You will see how many there are in the sludge that rises at the beggining of the cooking time. If you had made your bone broth in a crock pot you would have eaten that, yuck! Cook for about an hour, skimming off that sludgy foam and replacing water if it goes below the bones.

2. While the bones are cooking have the wings soaking in water to remove any cloudines (I use about 3 to 4 pounds). Add in the wings to the broth a pound or so at a time, cook for 20 minutes and transfer to a foil lined, and coconut oil greased, baking sheet. Cook all of the wings in the same manner. When the wings are all cooked continue cooking the chicken broth on very high heat, with the lid off until 3 hours is done, sometimes I will go 4 hours if the pot is low on bones. Keep replacing the water till the end.

3. Turn off the bone broth, cool slightly and strain through a metal sieve into a clean glass bowl, cover and refrigerate overnight. The next morning scrape off all the soft PUFA laden fat that rose to the top and toss it. At this point you can use the broth or freeze it for another time.

4. To finish the dinner wings, I rub down the wings with refined coconut oil, season them with garlic salt (or whatever sounds good depending on the sauce I might toss them in), then broil them skin side down on an upper rack for about 5 minutes, turn them over and finish broiling them till browned and crispy.

One thing to think about is, that with all the evaporation and added water, and whatever else that is in your water source, good and bad, is all going to get concentrated in your broth. So if you are using fluoridated water the concentrations are gonna get higher than just drinking water, but no different than store bought broth. So use the purest water possible. I like to use my chicken bone broth mostly to make a variety of soups, Asian Pho, eggdrop soup, creamy chicken gravy, homemade enchilada sauce, meatball sauces, and fresh mashed beans. My gelatinous beef broth is slightly different so I will post those instructions next.

I thought oxalates in plants (and other toxins) were destroyed by cooking them well, either conventionally or with a pressure cooker.
 

Rinse & rePeat

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I thought oxalates in plants (and other toxins) were destroyed by cooking them well, either conventionally or with a pressure cooker.
I don't know about that. I know Ray Peat lightly cooks green and drinks the water, so I assume there is something still in those veggies he isn't wanting.
 

Rinse & rePeat

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I thought oxalates in plants (and other toxins) were destroyed by cooking them well, either conventionally or with a pressure cooker.
 

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Rinse & rePeat

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I don't see that cooking does anything for ridding oxalates, except transfer them into the water.
 

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ALS

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Calcium binds to oxalates (chelates?). If there's sufficient calcium intake, either from the plant itself or via food / supplements, would the oxalate content be an issue?
 

Rinse & rePeat

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Calcium binds to oxalates (chelates?). If there's sufficient calcium intake, either from the plant itself or via food / supplements, would the oxalate content be an issue?
Oxalates do bind to calcium, but the problem with that is that the oxalates carry the calcium out of the body. You would have to drink so much more calcium to make up for it, if that even works. I just don't even go there.
 

Rinse & rePeat

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Calcium binds to oxalates (chelates?). If there's sufficient calcium intake, either from the plant itself or via food / supplements, would the oxalate content be an issue?
I tried the calcium suppliment route, the few years I took dairy out of my diet, and I ended up with kidney, pancreas and gall stones because of it. I even had calcium crystal shards coming through the roof of mouth! Since adding dairy back 5 years ago I have had no problems.
 

Old Irenaeus

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Looks great. I am going to try making some gummies with gelatin, fruit juice, and perhaps MCT oil. I am wondering how long they will keep as I want to make some to take on a trip.
 

Rinse & rePeat

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Looks great, bet it tastes even better @Rinse & rePeat

I've been doing oj yello with great results, its very gabaergic

I have been making fresh jellos with the Great Lakes (orange can) gelatin and even marshmallows, but I haven't made gummies.
 

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Rinse & rePeat

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Looks great. I am going to try making some gummies with gelatin, fruit juice, and perhaps MCT oil. I am wondering how long they will keep as I want to make some to take on a trip.
I am anxious to know how your gummies turn out Irenaeus! Give us a report back 😋
 

Rinse & rePeat

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What about the PUFAs from chicken?
I buy corn & soy free chicken wings from Northstarbison.com, but regardless of that the PUFA is in the fat, which rises to the top of the broth, while it is chilling, and I scoop that off and throw it away. That is the great part about making the wings at the same time, not only does all of the flavor from the chicken wings (and some of the collagen) go into the broth, but the PUFA from the skin does too and is thrown out. Rubbing the wings with refined coconut oil mitigates any further PUFA. You could not get that much PUFA out of chicken any other way. Buying corn and soy free is already lower in PUFA to begin with than any store bought chicken. Keep in mind the soy and corn free chicken seems like an expensive route for wings, but really isn't when you add in what it costs for good bone broth and how much more gelatinous this homemade stuff is!
 

Rinse & rePeat

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And an "ASMR" Youtube video where the broth fat is removed, etc.
When you refrigerate your just cooled down and strained broth and then chill it overnight the fat will naturally collect on the top, making it easy to remove. The fat on the chicken bone broth is soft and fatty and not as cleanly removed, but the grass fed beef fat is hard and comes off in nice chunks to freeze. You can see the fat in the top in my beef bone broth pic. I had already scraped the fat off in my chicken bone broth pic.
 

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Rinse & rePeat

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That’s hilarious! Thank you for posting these instructions! There are a lot of Ray Peat inspired recipes out there, but they really need videos or detailed instructions (like this).
Many are either difficult (Potato Juice Soup), have “unusual” tweaks - like boil times, or use atypical ingredients like the coconut oil ice cream.
@Rinse & rePeat, do you have a spot where all your recipes are aggregated?
Until I figure out something better, I will make a chicken wing post next (in the next few days), then posts on my gelatinous beef bone broth, my 5 minute no cream ice cream and my low histamine custard recipes. You're just gonna have to come find me for now. I am always cooking up something amazing :)
 

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