Frequent Urination

Discussion in 'Diet' started by stpa92, Jul 30, 2019.

  1. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Probably because it has anticholinergic effects. Cyproheptadine also has anticholinergic effects, although it didn't seem to work at the time I was peeing often in large quantities. Maybe it was because when the bladder is full, it just has to go.
     
  2. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Another thing that would influence urination is WiFi signals. I just happened to move to another room to sleep when the house was being renovated. This room is on the far corner of the house, and doesn't get wifi signals and DECT cordless phone signals. For the next few days after I moved, I began to sleep more and I only woke up once to urinate where it used to be 4 times.

    It was a serendipitous discovery. And to think that I use a wifi router and two repeaters at home. Talk about overkill. Now I shut all of these off when I go to sleep. It's an added chore, but it's worth the extra work.
     
  3. pinacolada

    pinacolada Member

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    I struggle with this too. Have you ever taken large doses of aspirin? It seems to help me (~800mg)
     
  4. stevski

    stevski Member

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    frequent urination is one symptom of hypothyroidism. i suggest you read Prostate Cancer
     
  5. Owen B

    Owen B Member

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    Eat less salt. Urine is usually over acidic. Metabolic acidosis is very common and excess salt contributes to it. Your bladder may be inflamed from excess acid.
     
  6. Owen B

    Owen B Member

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    It's not just the salt and the resultant acidosis; it's how your minerals go out of balance as a result.

    When I was using salt to taste all it did for me was to give me a massive case of hypertension and heart arhythymias. I stopped the salt, the hypertension dissolved and the muscle cramps I had been fighting for a year went away. But the frequent urination remained.

    I thought that if salt blocks potassium I'd give it a try. Maybe it would slow the heart down and also get at the frequent urination. The citrate was horrible even at low doses; it made my contractions worse. Potassium bicarbonate was even worse; it gave me chest tension and crazy amounts of frequent urination. So there's something there with the minerals.

    Next stop: magnesium bicarbonate. Alkalinize, buffering and maybe something for the urination.
     
  7. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I have a theory on this. It is due to the antibiotic lessening the load on our innate immune system - the wbc's such as neutrophils (for bacteria) and lymphocytes (for virus). When the wbc's don't have to destroy pathogens via phagocytosis, there is less of a need for both the respiratory burst to provide ROS to kill pathogens, as well as the need for anti-oxidants to neutralize spillover ROS that may destroy surrounding tissues. Both the processes of creating oxidants and of neutralizing remaining oxidants produce water as a by-product. If I'm right on this, there must be a lot of energy expended, as a lot of water has to be urinated. A body with chronic infection wastes a lot of energy that would otherwise have better uses.

    I've been testing many things as I work on lowering my blood pressure, which I've narrowed down to being caused by atherosclerosis as it affects the capillaries more than the arteries, and being primarily a manifestation of a problem with capillaries in my kidneys, and specifically on the glomerulus. One way to reduce the atheromata is to lyse the plaque using proteolytic enzymes. When I take proteolytic enzymes, I would experience very frequent urination. It gets worse the more proteolytic enzymes I take. At once point, I would be urinating every 45 minutes, with a very full bladder. I had to reduce my intake of enzymes, and it further helped when I took doxycycline together with the enzymes. My case of atherosclerosis was due to chronic periodontal infection, and over time the plaque that accumulated included biofilms of bacteria. When the plaque was being lysed by enzymes, the biofilm would be disrupted and bacteria would be released.

    This has led me to believe that often, low-level chronic infection (often lumped into the general class of low-level inflammation) is not detected and thus, not considered. There is an infection, but it is low-grade in nature, such that there is no fever involved. Doctors thus don't bother to look into it, and people follow their doctors like children follow pied pipers. A low-cost and non-invasive way to check for low-level infection is to look at the value of your wbc and neutrophils in a CBC blood test. Don't follow the standard-of-care ranges, but base your care on optimal values, which functional doctors use.

    In the case of wbc, the optimal value. Dr. Weatherby's range is 5 -7.5 while Dr. Tom Lewis' range is 4-6. With neutrophils, Dr. Weatherby's range is 40-60%.
     
  8. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I have to another theory, as now I think the increased urination is really from LPS being released from bacteria die-off. The bacteria could either be killed by phagocytosis by the immune system, or by antibioterials. The LPS storm could be triggering the frequent urination. Progesterone could deactivate LPS, and this could stop the frequent urination. Progesterone May Bind And Deactivate Endotoxin (LPS) Directly
     
  9. OP
    stpa92

    stpa92 Member

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    I did a urine dipstick test ( Chemstrip 10, Vial of 100 | Carolina.com ) and my urine pH was 5.5, the lowest pH measurable on the strip. The dipstick also showed trace protein. Some googling told me that trace protein in the urine is not unusual and not a concern, but I'm not sure about this

    One thing I forgot to mention: I had a kidney stone several years ago that I never passed (as far as I know). One theory that I have is that this stone could be lodged somewhere in my bladder causing an obstruction. This would explain why my bladder wall has thickened and why I feel that I am not voiding fully

    So where do I go from here? Try to improve the urine pH or trying to dislodge a stone that may or may not still be there?
     
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