FREEZING hands and feet

Discussion in 'iLoveSugar' started by iLoveSugar, Oct 26, 2013.

  1. iLoveSugar

    iLoveSugar Member

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    I can not, for the life of me, warm up my hands or feet. They are always so cold, it's very uncomfortable to touch any part of my body. I have not found a way, with any food, or non-food, to warm up my extremeties and keep them warm.
     
  2. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Improve your metabolic rate then hands and feet will warm up.
     
  3. Jenn

    Jenn Member

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    Thyroid
     
  4. ilovethesea

    ilovethesea Member

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    Also try sitting under bright lights.
     
  5. OP
    iLoveSugar

    iLoveSugar Member

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    I have 500 watts on my legs/feet about 10 hours a day.
     
  6. ilovethesea

    ilovethesea Member

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    Ah ok. Then I second the thyroid reco. I used to be freezing all the time and that made the biggest difference.
     
  7. lindsay

    lindsay Member

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    no joke on the thyroid supplementing. I forgot what it was like to always be freezing.
     
  8. OP
    iLoveSugar

    iLoveSugar Member

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    I feel it's terrible circulation, or something besides thyroid. Unless I just simply need a TON of thyroid.

    I have been using cytomel, up to 30 mcg daily, for many months, and it never warms me up. Also, NO food, salt, sugar, etc, seems to warm them up. They are ALWAYS. 100%. Frozen! My hands, about 80% of the time. Even socks don't warm up my feet.
     
  9. ilovethesea

    ilovethesea Member

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    This. I used to think my cold extremities were due to "circulation" too but no, thyroid was the only thing that worked - and it *really* works.

    Why don't you try Cynoplus? Also, do you measure your body temperature and pulse?
     
  10. OP
    iLoveSugar

    iLoveSugar Member

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    Thanks so much for the reply. I'm currently googling all kinds of info about ALS since I have had this uncontrollable wrist twitching/hand weakness for the past day or so. Agh!

    I know we are all different, but what amount/how often proved to be the trick for you? The reason I only take cytomel, is because during our email conversation, Ray has continually said that T3 alone is better for now since the T4 will not work if any liver issues are present. Pretty much, T3 will guarantee to work...

    I have taken many intrevals of 4-6 mcg, and noticed no improvement.
     
  11. NooMoahk

    NooMoahk Member

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    Sometimes coffee makes my extremities colder, as does not getting a good workout in the day, as does not getting enough carbohydrate or protein, as does not getting adequate light but you probably have the light covered. It's true that increasing the metabolic rate is the solution. Food, thyroid, exercise, lights, etc are just different ways of accomplishing that. Circulation also improves with a higher metabolic rate. In the winter months, don't drink/eat cold things or go without socks/hats/etc if cold extremities are a problem for you. Letting your environment cool you off wastes calories and with a low metabolic rate, your body will focus on heating your core up as opposed to circulating blood everywhere it's needed. Make it really easy on your body, eat lots of calories, and perhaps shock it occasionally(like with a cold shower to stimulate blood flow) but not often enough to be stressful.
     
  12. pboy

    pboy Member

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    next time your driving sing or yell as loud as you can, eat something very spicy, get nearly drunk, put on music and flail your body around and feel loose, do anything that allows intense inner expression -> out, and move your limbs as much as possible

    Noo ^ makes many good points as well
     
  13. NooMoahk

    NooMoahk Member

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    Yes, having fun in a physical way is stress relieving and a great form of exercise. Another tip: Today I was feeling a bit cold because my roommates and I sometimes don't use the heater. I was able to stay warm in a 57 degree F environment, in shorts and t-shirt, by just eating excess sugars. I probably had about 150 grams more than I would usually eat, in the form of fresh OJ and honey. How much extra sugar have you tried?
     
  14. pboy

    pboy Member

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    lol awesome...yea for sure...I'm becoming more and more convinced that having a good amount of food on the fire is pretty much necessary for not only being warm, but to even feel vibrations of good feeling within the body. If I work through lunch and end up not eating for like 8 or 9 hours, even if its 67 degrees I'll feel kind of cold and off. I also notice that when I engage in activity, especially captivating activity, I tend to either not notice the cold, or actually get warmer during the process
     
  15. OP
    iLoveSugar

    iLoveSugar Member

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    Took 48 mcg of T3 yesterday (4x 12mcg doses), and still didn't warm up at all.
     
  16. HDD

    HDD Member

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    This is from Broda Barnes book.

    "Thyroid therapy does not produce overnight change. No change may be noted for about a month. Usually, at some point between one month and two months after the beginning of therapy, some of the symptoms begin to subside and the individual begins to feel better.

    Earlier in the same chapter it says..

    "The starting dosage should be maintained for about two months. After that, if necessary, the dosage may be increased."

    I am sorry you are so cold. I hate being cold. Have you made bone broths? They can be very warming. Especially with added salt and coconut oil.
     
  17. j.

    j. Guest

    I think this is a misinterpretation. If I were you I would try something with T3 and T4, like cynoplus or ERFA.
     
  18. OP
    iLoveSugar

    iLoveSugar Member

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    Recent quotes to me from RP:

    "The liver has to activate T4 for it to work, and if the liver doesn't convert it, extra T4 can lower your gland's activity. When T3 increases after being deficient, it increases your sensitivity to adrenaline, and that can make you anxious, and can stop intestinal action. It takes a few days of continuous T3 action for the adrenaline to adjust down to normal. Dividing a T3 tablet (powder, or small crumbs) into many parts, about one microgram with a meal would be a good place to start. At first, they should be spaced about 8 or 12 hours apart, while you watch for the effects".

    "If your liver isn't working efficiently, the T4 part of cynoplus can accumulate, preventing the active T3 from working. Cynomel is just T3, there's no T4 to accumulate, and you can feel the effect quickly. It allows you to adjust the dose faster."

    "T3 is helpful for reducing the stress-related reverse T3, but to use it effectively requires frequent small doses, while watching effects such as pulse rate carefully, repeatedly each day".
     
  19. OP
    iLoveSugar

    iLoveSugar Member

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    I've discussed this with Ray also. Broda often prescribed Armour, and it took longer to find the correct dose. Ray says that T3 allows you to find the correct dose relatively fast.
     
  20. HDD

    HDD Member

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    Ok, sorry, I just read back thru this thread and read you had been taking cytomel for months with no results.

    Are you monitoring your temperature and pulse throughout the day?

    Your basal temperature?
     
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