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Focusing on steady blood sugars — missing link to health in Peat Land

jomamma007

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Jul 16, 2021
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Strap on a continuous glucose monitor and watch cause-and-effect.

I wrote a note to Dr. Peat about it.

I’m finding huge benefits to keeping in The Zone, around 90 - 100 if possible during the day and at night. Never falling into hypoglycemia.

I am beginning to theorize that swings in blood sugar, along with excursions into hypo land, are most harmful. I’m seeing huge benefits almost immediately from this.

My headaches are better and better, and fewer, so far. And I have more energy and less brain fog, fewer endotoxin symptoms. I can exercise more without anything hurting.

So far.

1. Avoid excursions into anything below 70 mg/dL.
2. Avoid big swings, period.

The newer technology of CGM makes this very easy to monitor.
Hello,
Not to come across rude, but I thought steady blood sugars was already a main factor in the peat sphere. It’s something that I think Kate Deering put into an easily digestible way for the average joe in her book based of Rays Works.

Eating every 3-4 hours etc, protein/carb/fat together etc. I’ve seen this alone help many people more than worrying about calcium/phosphate ratios etc, not that it isn’t important.

It’s why so many on Instagram are having success with a “pro metabolic” diet and why it’s grown so popular over the last few years. I know it’s how I found out about Peat…
 

InChristAlone

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i just managed to have really stable blood sugar all day after suffering from fluctiating bloodsugar my whole life.
how? i just started eating whartever i want, even stuff with seed oils in them. i also started only eating 3 or 4 times a day. i dont want to be eating seed oils though.
This is how I cure unstable blood sugar as well (at least by how I feel, my BG is always normal).
 

Zsazsa

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Nov 23, 2016
Messages
2,537
Hiatus hernia and heart burn correlates with LONGER time for my glucose to drop back into normal range.
This observation is pure gold!
Interestingly when I had hiatus hernia and GERD my HbA1c was 4.8... Had massive rebound hypos.
 

ecstatichamster

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Nov 21, 2015
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Unless you monitor your glucose you have no idea if it’s “stable” or not.

And I have been doing “Peat” type diet for years. Actually I have to thank @yerrag for opening my eyes to this possibility and then I decided to check into it.

It has seriously been a godsend and I am still learning a great deal. I went briefly hypoglycemic today and would never have known it. But the result is always a cortisol spike, free fatty acids And inflammatory cytokines that can cause issues for a day or so.

I have been feeling SO much better since I have been working on this. But it isn’t simple and there are many variables and many are personal to your situation.

69622EF3-F681-4CB3-BDF0-093AEE463675.jpeg
Even if you do finger prick tests, you can miss all the important points as this chart shows.
 

ecstatichamster

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Nov 21, 2015
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I was actually using the Ultrahuman CGM device... But I am going to do another video in the future encompassing more of my findings.

Here are some of the notes I made (not in detail):
No correlation between headaches and glucose
No correlation between glucose and energy
Correlation between mild dizziness and low glucose
I can feel a hypo episode (more nervous/anxious)
Hunger is NOT correlated to blood sugar levels
Late night eating is much worse
Protein with carbs keeps glucose stable
What about post meal triglycerides? This is completely ignored wearing a CGM.
Assessing post meal insulin? Can we design a device that measures insulin instead?
Fruit generally does NOT spike my glucose levels, as say compared to Rice and oats.
Hiatus hernia and heart burn correlates with LONGER time for my glucose to drop back into normal range.
Liquid drinks are terriblE for glucose
I have not found that when the sugar spikes that there is a rebound hunger effect.
Cane sugar water spiked it 158 on an empty stomach , which correlates with feeling highly energetic

That’s interesting. I do agree about liquids. That kind of makes milk a problem. I find adding collagen helps smooth it out but an hour later a spike can drop into hypoglycemia. Milk works when it’s preceded by solid foods.

I find there is a correlation with headaches and blood sugar, but it is over time, not immediate. So my headaches are worse when I’m going into hypoglycemia periodically.

Erections are better when I avoid hypoglycemic episodes.

Also other symptoms are related, but they show up over time, not due to an acute hypoglycemia episode. The episodes are additive for me and add up to some very bad symptoms, none of them from acute hypoglycemia.

I can detect it now but it is subtle. I can wake up when I’m going hypoglycemic so I can eat some protein. Eating sugar AFTER protein is helpful and sustains good blood sugar.
 

InChristAlone

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How much protein though? I find protein insulinogenic and @Tarmander confirmed that for me when he said on days he eats a lot of beef he needs more insulin to keep his BG in control (he's type one diabetic).
 

Ledo

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Joined
Jul 31, 2015
Messages
395
Unless you monitor your glucose you have no idea if it’s “stable” or not.

And I have been doing “Peat” type diet for years. Actually I have to thank @yerrag for opening my eyes to this possibility and then I decided to check into it.

It has seriously been a godsend and I am still learning a great deal. I went briefly hypoglycemic today and would never have known it. But the result is always a cortisol spike, free fatty acids And inflammatory cytokines that can cause issues for a day or so.

I have been feeling SO much better since I have been working on this. But it isn’t simple and there are many variables and many are personal to your situation.

View attachment 38711
Even if you do finger prick tests, you can miss all the important points as this chart shows.


hamster, aren't we talking really high glucose readings here? That 9 am peak is over 300 (mg/dl)! Is this a graph from your cgm? I don't believe you have ever mentioned these kind of numbers.
 

Ledo

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Joined
Jul 31, 2015
Messages
395
The number one thing that wrecks my blood sugar is having worked out the previous day, resistance training. I presume its lactate buildup.

I have to be careful with carbs or on my second and third meal I can spike 140 to 160 mg/dl and take an hour or more to get under 100. Otherwise my numbers are very good and quick to move lower in insulin response.
 

ecstatichamster

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hamster, aren't we talking really high glucose readings here? That 9 am peak is over 300 (mg/dl)! Is this a graph from your cgm? I don't believe you have ever mentioned these kind of numbers.

no that’s not mine.
 

yerrag

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Mar 29, 2016
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10,061
Location
Manila
Strap on a continuous glucose monitor and watch cause-and-effect.

I wrote a note to Dr. Peat about it.

I’m finding huge benefits to keeping in The Zone, around 90 - 100 if possible during the day and at night. Never falling into hypoglycemia.

I am beginning to theorize that swings in blood sugar, along with excursions into hypo land, are most harmful. I’m seeing huge benefits almost immediately from this.

My headaches are better and better, and fewer, so far. And I have more energy and less brain fog, fewer endotoxin symptoms. I can exercise more without anything hurting.

So far.

1. Avoid excursions into anything below 70 mg/dL.
2. Avoid big swings, period.

The newer technology of CGM makes this very easy to monitor.
I know the feeling.

It's never too late to learn of something that is very impact full on improving one's health.

Give it more time and you will realize you are only seeing the immediately obvious effects good blood sugar regulation.

I find that the impact on immunity to be the most I appreciate from improved blood sugar regulation.
Still a work in process. I have found that minimizing swings is good. Minimizing hypo episodes is essential. Setting yourself up with a good breakfast assures the rest of the day is good. You can have fruit juice or Coke but only after you’ve eaten protein. Don’t have too much protein at a sitting — avoid having a steak. Just have 1/4 of the steak. Too much protein sets up huge swings which can result In hypoglycemia.

Broda Barnes book on Hypoglycemia advocates a low carb diet, but I don’t believe that’s good. With good carb intake, I am spending most of my time in a reasonable range and last night I had NO hypoglycemia.

I’m also doing 2g of taurine three times daily after meals, and oral NAD+ twice daily.

I can see why Dr. Peat says the whole day is your opportunity to load up your liver to prepare for the period of fasting during sleep. As usual he is 1000% right.

I’m spending more and more time in the zone of around 90 ng/dL for hours at a time now.

There was a time I felt better eating a large piece of steak along with rice. I think why I felt better was because having a lot of meat to go with rice slows down my digestion given that meat takes longer to digest. So that helped to slow down also the rate by which the meal, with sugar and protein, is assimilated into the blood from the small intestine.

This helps spread the flow of nutrients to my bloodstream over a longer period of time. At that time, I had difficulty absorbing quickly a large influx of carbs, and this tends to cause my blood sugar to build up quickly when fed high carb with little meat. This in turn causes my blood sugar to plummet when insulin is secreted to signal the liver to convert the excess blood sugar to fatty acids. And I had low glycogen stores as well, so my blood sugar would keep gping down to hypoglycemic levels. since there wasn't enough glycogen to be converted to blood sugar to increase my blood sugar levels.

There are many factors that affect how our our blood sugar fluctuates. Taurine as I understand helps the liver build up glycogen stores.
 

yerrag

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Adding small portions of protein between meals (15 grams of whey protein) keeps my mood in line without a sugar crash.
That helps especially when you have low glycogen to tap into to fill in for low blood sugar levels. The protein gets converted into blood sugar when adrenalin cannot trigger glycogen to convert to sugar, and the adrenals will then produce cortisol which converts protein to blood sugar.

When I had this condition, I used to take beef jerky with me on long driving trips and it kept me well along my 7 hour trips.
 

yerrag

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When I consume starch from (sprouted) whole grains such as oats or bulgur, or potatoes, with enough milk or cheese (and keep fat, mostly saturated, moderate) blood glucose remains steady, besides a very small post-prandial spike which quickly returns to baseline and never dips below, and I am satiated until my next meal. When I eat starch, especially refined, with no dairy and/or very little saturated fat, or too much fat, my blood glucose will spike much higher and in the former case (no fat) it will then drop like a brick and I will become ravenously hungry shortly thereafter, while in the latter it will remain elevated and take much longer to return to baseline due to the Randle Cycle.

*Edited for clarity.
Your tissues' ability to quickly absorb and metabolize a large influx of glucose is limited. This could be due to a lack of potassium, or thyroid, or due to fatty acids inhibiting sugar absorption. It may also be due to the presence of certain enzymes from pathogenic bacteria (such as periodontal bacteria) which delays the action of insulin in lowering blood sugar from say 2 hours into 2.5 hours after a meal. The effect of this would be a stronger than usual response of the liver when the insulin finally kicks in, and this has the effect if blood sugar towards hypoglycemic levels.

If you scratch all of the above, then you are left with the possibility of having low glycogen stores, which would keep your blood sugar levels from recovering as the blood sugar level boost expected from the conversion of glycogen to glucose is not available.
 

yerrag

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i just managed to have really stable blood sugar all day after suffering from fluctiating bloodsugar my whole life.
how? i just started eating whartever i want, even stuff with seed oils in them. i also started only eating 3 or 4 times a day. i dont want to be eating seed oils though.
This is a way to manage poor blood sugar regulation. It's a good approach. I used to eat brown rice instead of white and it helped me a lot in keeping my blood sugar levels stable, as the glucose slowly trickles into the bloodstream from the slower digestion of brown rice (due to the higher fiber content that slows down digestion).

But if you can work on improving your blood sugar regulation and succeed in it, you won't need to eat as much to manage your condition.
 

yerrag

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Unless you monitor your glucose you have no idea if it’s “stable” or not.

And I have been doing “Peat” type diet for years. Actually I have to thank @yerrag for opening my eyes to this possibility and then I decided to check into it.

It has seriously been a godsend and I am still learning a great deal. I went briefly hypoglycemic today and would never have known it. But the result is always a cortisol spike, free fatty acids And inflammatory cytokines that can cause issues for a day or so.

I have been feeling SO much better since I have been working on this. But it isn’t simple and there are many variables and many are personal to your situation.

View attachment 38711
Even if you do finger prick tests, you can miss all the important points as this chart shows.
The finger pricks work well for me. But I'm old school. Also, I tend to develop keloids so CGM could cause me to develop more keloids.

At any rate, either method is a lot better than relying on HbA1c or FBS.

Too many people are sick because they rely on these wrong markers to give them a false assurance of blood sugar health and this is like building a house on sand.
 

Jam

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Your tissues' ability to quickly absorb and metabolize a large influx of glucose is limited. This could be due to a lack of potassium, or thyroid, or due to fatty acids inhibiting sugar absorption. It may also be due to the presence of certain enzymes from pathogenic bacteria (such as periodontal bacteria) which delays the action of insulin in lowering blood sugar from say 2 hours into 2.5 hours after a meal. The effect of this would be a stronger than usual response of the liver when the insulin finally kicks in, and this has the effect if blood sugar towards hypoglycemic levels.

If you scratch all of the above, then you are left with the possibility of having low glycogen stores, which would keep your blood sugar levels from recovering as the blood sugar level boost expected from the conversion of glycogen to glucose is not available.
Refined starch, when eaten alone, is known to cause these effects, it is perfectly normal. if one really must eat refined starch without fat, it is better to eat fruit (which contains fructose) along with it. But since I never eat isolated refined starch, mainly due to the taste, this isn't really an issue for me. In fact, my glucose metabolism couldn't be better. I tend to avoid eating refined starch without fat (or with too much).
 

yerrag

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Refined starch, when eaten alone, is known to cause these effects, it is perfectly normal. if one really must eat refined starch without fat, it is much better to eat fruit (which contains fructose) along with it. But since I never eat isolated refined starch, mainly due to the taste, this isn't really an issue for me. In fact, my glucose metabolism couldn't be better. I tend to avoid eating refined starch without fat (or with too much).
Refined starch such as refined wheat and white rice and their products all quickly get digested and assimilated into the bloodstream. in this way, they do not differ much from white sugar and honey, except that the latter two are disaccharides of glucose and fructose.

Taken alone, what is normal is that they will raise blood sugar levels to around 140-150 (for those with good tissue absorption of sugar) and to much higher levels past 200 (for those without), for non-diabetics. But whether the blood sugar levels stay within normoglycemic levels or go to hypoglycemic levels is going to differ, based on a few factors.
 
Last edited:

Jam

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Refined starch such as refined wheat and white rice and their products all quickly get digested and assimilated into the bloodstream. in this way, they do not differ much from white sugar and honey, except that the latter two are disaccharides of glucose and fructose.

Taken alone, what is normal is that they will raise blood sugar levels to around 140-150 (for those with good tissue absorption of sugar) and to much higher levels past 200 (for those without), for non-diabetics. But whether the blood sugar levels stay within normoglycemic levels or go to hypoglycemic levels is going to differ, based on a few factors.
Indeed. The few times I ate refined starch alone as a test while I was wearing a CGM, my blood glucose would shoot up to 140-160, and then proceed to crash back to baseline, after which I would become ravenously hungry, as stated. On the other hand, eating starch in a more intelligent manner, with fat, preferably dairy to offset the phosphorous with calcium, would cause a much lower, flatter wave, as the dairy fat slows digestion so that the energy absorbed is more of a steady influx rather than an acute bolus.
 

Jam

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Refined starch such as refined wheat and white rice and their products all quickly get digested and assimilated into the bloodstream. in this way, they do not differ much from white sugar and honey, except that the latter two are disaccharides of glucose and fructose.
Sorry, forgot to comment the above quote: The metabolism of isolated refined starch (glucose) vs. sucrose (glucose+fructose) or a glucose/fructose mix is not at all the same. See, for example:

J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2000 Dec;85(12):4515-9. Acute fructose administration decreases the glycemic response to an oral glucose tolerance test in normal adults. Moore MC, Cherrington AD, Mann SL, Davis SN. “In animal models, a small (catalytic) dose of fructose administered with glucose decreases the glycemic response to the glucose load.” “In conclusion, low dose fructose improves the glycemic response to an oral glucose load in normal adults without significantly enhancing the insulin or triglyceride response. Fructose appears most effective in those normal individuals who have the poorest glucose tolerance.”

This is why I mentioned above that if one must eat plain bread or white rice without (or not enough) fat, it would be wise to eat some fruit with it...
 

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