• Due to excessive bot signups along with nefarious actors we are limiting forum registration. Keep checking back for the register link to appear. Please do not send emails or have someone post to the forum asking for a signup link. Until the current climate changes we do not see a change of this policy. To join the forum you must have a compelling reason. Letting us know what skills/knowledge you will bring to the community along with the intent of your stay here will help in getting you approved.

Fluoride In Tap Water Is One Likely Cause Of Hypothyroidism

haidut

Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2013
Messages
18,832
Location
USA / Europe
The study is being criticized by the mainstream press, but the authors stand behind their findings and claim the result have been replicated many times (in animals studies).

http://www.newsweek.com/water-fluoridat ... ?piano_d=1
http://jech.bmj.com/content/early/2015/ ... 1.abstract

"...A large study that looked at data from nearly every general medical practice in England suggests that water fluoridation may increase the risk of developing hypothyroidism, or underactive thyroid. This condition, in which the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough hormones, is associated with symptoms such as fatigue, obesity and depression. The study found that locations with fluoridated water supplies were more than 30 percent more likely to have high levels of hypothyroidism, compared to areas with low levels of the chemical in the water. Overall, there were 9 percent more cases of underactive thyroid in fluoridated places."
 

Sheik

Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2014
Messages
659
"The study found that locations with fluoridated water supplies were more than 30 percent more likely to have high levels of hypothyroidism"

Wow.

It sucks that my Brita filter doesn't remove fluoride.
 

Sheik

Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2014
Messages
659
I'm surprised there isn't more talk going on about this. It could be a very important factor for a lot of people, judging by that study.
 

jyb

Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2012
Messages
2,780
Location
UK
This study is timely, before the prevalence of water fluoridation in the UK increases. I can't imagine people accepting to be drinking added chemicals in their water, especially for such a controversial one like fluoride.
 

jyb

Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2012
Messages
2,780
Location
UK
Seems like the critic is arguing that hypothyroidism is mostly iodine deficiency, so no connection to fluoride, and discarded all other human and animal studies on fluoride. Dentists, who have been the ones encouraging fluoride exposure through water and toothpaste for decades, stand to lose almost all their credibility on this controversy.

A critic of the study: http://jech.bmj.com/content/69/7/617.full#ref-7

Hypothyroidism in this country is largely an autoimmune disease, the aetiology of which is well described.7 The evidence provided in support of the authors’ prior hypothesis of an association with water fluoridation is, therefore, likely to be irrelevant to patients listed on Quality and Outcomes Framework registers in England in 2012, who are not generally at risk of iodine deficiency. In addition, some 20–30% of these patients will be receiving levothyroxine because of previous thyroid ablation by surgery or radiation therapy to treat hyperthyroidism,7 which is even less likely to be in any way related to fluoride ingestion.

It relies a lot on this study: http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10 ... 2761016458

Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of hypothyroidism worldwide. In persons living in iodine-replete areas, causes are congenital, spontaneous because of chronic autoimmune disease (atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis or goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis [Hashimoto's thyroiditis]), or iatrogenic because of goitrogens, drugs, or destructive treatment for thyrotoxicosis. Screening for congenital hypothyroidism exists and its use prevents mental retardation. The prevalence of spontaneous hypothyroidism is between 1% and 2% and is more common in older women and 10 times more common in women than in men. A significant proportion of subjects have asymptomatic chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and 8% of women (10% of women over 55 years of age) and 3% of men have subclinical hypothyroidism. Approximately one third of patients with newly diagnosed overt hypothyroidism have received destructive therapy for hyperthyroidism and indefinite surveillance is required. There is not much that can be done to prevent the occurrence of spontaneous autoimmune hypothyroidism, but if identified early, something can be done to prevent progression to overt disease. Controversy exists as to whether healthy adults would benefit from screening for autoimmune thyroid disease because a significant proportion of subjects tested will have evidence of mild thyroid failure. Case finding in women at menopause or visiting a primary care physician with nonspecific symptoms appears justified.
 

pboy

Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2013
Messages
1,681
iodine can help prevent the body from absorbing into the thyroid bromine, fluoride, chlorine ect...if you are topped off in it, but still, avoiding those other halides is a big deal if at all possible
 

Hugh Johnson

Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2014
Messages
2,159
Location
The Sultanate of Portugal
jyb said:
https://raypeatforum.com/forums/posts/96798/ Seems like the critic is arguing that hypothyroidism is mostly iodine deficiency, so no connection to fluoride, and discarded all other human and animal studies on fluoride. Dentists, who have been the ones encouraging fluoride exposure through water and toothpaste for decades, stand to lose almost all their credibility on this controversy.
If memory serves, hypothyroidism exposes you to a large number of dental problems.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Greta

Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2015
Messages
72
Fluoride displaces iodine, there are a lot of studies about the connection between fluorinated water and hypothyroidism and other diseases.

Displaces iodine in the body

These figures would be worrying enough, since they mean that iodine deficiency, which results in hypothyroidism (thyroid hormone cannot be manufactured without iodine) is likely to affect huge numbers of people. What makes it infinitely worse, is that fluorine, being a halogen (chemically related to iodine), but very much more active, displaces iodine. So that the uptake of iodine is compromised by the ejection, as it were, of the iodine by fluorine. To condemn the entire population, already having marginal levels of iodine, to inevitable progressive failure of their thyroid system by fluoridating the water, borders on criminal lunacy.
I would like to place a scenario in front of those colleagues who favour fluoridation. A new pill is marketed. Some trials not all together satisfactory, nevertheless, show a striking improvement in dental caries. Unfortunately, it has been found to be thyrotoxic, mutagenic, immunosuppressive, cause arthritis and infertility in comparatively small doses over a relatively short period of time.
 

montmorency

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2013
Messages
255
Location
Oxfordshire, UK
Greta said:
https://raypeatforum.com/forums/posts/96828/ Fluoride displaces iodine, there are a lot of studies about the connection between fluorinated water and hypothyroidism and other diseases.

Displaces iodine in the body

These figures would be worrying enough, since they mean that iodine deficiency, which results in hypothyroidism (thyroid hormone cannot be manufactured without iodine) is likely to affect huge numbers of people. What makes it infinitely worse, is that fluorine, being a halogen (chemically related to iodine), but very much more active, displaces iodine. So that the uptake of iodine is compromised by the ejection, as it were, of the iodine by fluorine. To condemn the entire population, already having marginal levels of iodine, to inevitable progressive failure of their thyroid system by fluoridating the water, borders on criminal lunacy.
I would like to place a scenario in front of those colleagues who favour fluoridation. A new pill is marketed. Some trials not all together satisfactory, nevertheless, show a striking improvement in dental caries. Unfortunately, it has been found to be thyrotoxic, mutagenic, immunosuppressive, cause arthritis and infertility in comparatively small doses over a relatively short period of time.

Well, for what it's worth, since this is a UK study, the UK is, even by official standards, "deficient" in iodine and in selenium.

This may well be a contributing factor. Of course, it's not a good reason to let fluoride in tap-water off the hook.
We do need adequate iodine, but we do not need any fluoride.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Greta

Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2015
Messages
72
montmorency said:
https://raypeatforum.com/forums/posts/96867/
Greta said:
https://raypeatforum.com/forums/posts/96828/ Fluoride displaces iodine, there are a lot of studies about the connection between fluorinated water and hypothyroidism and other diseases.

Displaces iodine in the body

These figures would be worrying enough, since they mean that iodine deficiency, which results in hypothyroidism (thyroid hormone cannot be manufactured without iodine) is likely to affect huge numbers of people. What makes it infinitely worse, is that fluorine, being a halogen (chemically related to iodine), but very much more active, displaces iodine. So that the uptake of iodine is compromised by the ejection, as it were, of the iodine by fluorine. To condemn the entire population, already having marginal levels of iodine, to inevitable progressive failure of their thyroid system by fluoridating the water, borders on criminal lunacy.
I would like to place a scenario in front of those colleagues who favour fluoridation. A new pill is marketed. Some trials not all together satisfactory, nevertheless, show a striking improvement in dental caries. Unfortunately, it has been found to be thyrotoxic, mutagenic, immunosuppressive, cause arthritis and infertility in comparatively small doses over a relatively short period of time.

Well, for what it's worth, since this is a UK study, the UK is, even by official standards, "deficient" in iodine and in selenium.

This may well be a contributing factor. Of course, it's not a good reason to let fluoride in tap-water off the hook.
We do need adequate iodine, but we do not need any fluoride.


They started adding fluoride in different countries because they though it will help with dental health, but after they saw that it wasn't true, plus it lead to a lot of different health problems, there's a lot of info and controversy about fluorinated water. But in some countries they have kept doing so.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

forterpride

Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2013
Messages
242
The study is being criticized by the mainstream press, but the authors stand behind their findings and claim the result have been replicated many times (in animals studies).

http://www.newsweek.com/water-fluoridat ... ?piano_d=1
http://jech.bmj.com/content/early/2015/ ... 1.abstract

"...A large study that looked at data from nearly every general medical practice in England suggests that water fluoridation may increase the risk of developing hypothyroidism, or underactive thyroid. This condition, in which the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough hormones, is associated with symptoms such as fatigue, obesity and depression. The study found that locations with fluoridated water supplies were more than 30 percent more likely to have high levels of hypothyroidism, compared to areas with low levels of the chemical in the water. Overall, there were 9 percent more cases of underactive thyroid in fluoridated places."

What do you suggest we use instead of fluoride toothpaste Haidut? Is there a risk of cavities if we don't use flouride. I'm starting to think maybe the reason I can't get my waking temps and pulse up is because I brush with sensodyne day and night.Although my midday my temps are great.
 

haidut

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Mar 18, 2013
Messages
18,832
Location
USA / Europe
What do you suggest we use instead of fluoride toothpaste Haidut? Is there a risk of cavities if we don't use flouride. I'm starting to think maybe the reason I can't get my waking temps and pulse up is because I brush with sensodyne day and night.Although my midday my temps are great.

I think simply swishing with coconut or olive oil can have the same antiseptic effect as what the toothpaste claims to provide. The brushing of teeth is supposed to do mainly two things - strengthen teeth and kill pathogens that can cause plaque and gum disease. The tooth strength depends almost entirely on thyroid function and keeping estrogen low. So toothpaste would not be likely to help unless it contains things like thyroid, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K, etc. And for killing of the germs, you can use pretty much any antiseptic, even clear alcohol like vodka. Listerine is a just a more toxic version of alcohol mouth wash.
Something that potentially combines both the tooth strengthening and antiseptic effects would be a solution of caffeine. So, making a 2%-5% solution and doing moutwashes a few times day would probably be a viable alternative to toothpaste. You can still brush gently without paste just to get some of the food debris out of the hiding places.
 

jaa

Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2012
Messages
1,035
I think simply swishing with coconut or olive oil can have the same antiseptic effect as what the toothpaste claims to provide. The brushing of teeth is supposed to do mainly two things - strengthen teeth and kill pathogens that can cause plaque and gum disease. The tooth strength depends almost entirely on thyroid function and keeping estrogen low. So toothpaste would not be likely to help unless it contains things like thyroid, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K, etc. And for killing of the germs, you can use pretty much any antiseptic, even clear alcohol like vodka. Listerine is a just a more toxic version of alcohol mouth wash.
Something that potentially combines both the tooth strengthening and antiseptic effects would be a solution of caffeine. So, making a 2%-5% solution and doing moutwashes a few times day would probably be a viable alternative to toothpaste. You can still brush gently without paste just to get some of the food debris out of the hiding places.

I'm going to give that a try. Is that caffeine solution in water or alcohol?
 

haidut

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Mar 18, 2013
Messages
18,832
Location
USA / Europe
I'm going to give that a try. Is that caffeine solution in water or alcohol?

Caffeine dissolves better in water (I think) but dissolving it in ethanol would basically increase the antiseptic cffect. You'd be creating a Peatarian "Listerine" of sorts.
 

jaa

Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2012
Messages
1,035
Caffeine dissolves better in water (I think) but dissolving it in ethanol would basically increase the antiseptic cffect. You'd be creating a Peatarian "Listerine" of sorts.

Thanks for the info.
 

kiran

Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2012
Messages
1,054
Ethanol tends to dry gums out. Thats not so great for a mouthwash. Ethanol in mouthwash may be linked to cancer.
 

whit

Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2016
Messages
473
haidut post: 130641 said:
I think simply swishing with coconut or olive oil can have the same antiseptic effect as what the toothpaste claims to provide. The brushing of teeth is supposed to do mainly two things - strengthen teeth and kill pathogens that can cause plaque and gum disease. The tooth strength depends almost entirely on thyroid function and keeping estrogen low. So toothpaste would not be likely to help unless it contains things like thyroid, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K, etc. And for killing of the germs, you can use pretty much any antiseptic, even clear alcohol like vodka. Listerine is a just a more toxic version of alcohol mouth wash.
Something that potentially combines both the tooth strengthening and antiseptic effects would be a solution of caffeine. So, making a 2%-5% solution and doing moutwashes a few times day would probably be a viable alternative to toothpaste. You can still brush gently without paste just to get some of the food debris out of the hiding places.
So brush with Irish coffee? I'm in!:thumbsup:
 
Last edited:

haidut

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Mar 18, 2013
Messages
18,832
Location
USA / Europe
Ethanol tends to dry gums out. Thats not so great for a mouthwash. Ethanol in mouthwash may be linked to cancer.

I guess it is possible, but that would mean all the people who drink on a regular basis would be prone to mouth cancer as there would be a much longer contact of ethanol with oral mucosa in drinkers. They do have higher rate of GI cancers but I have not seen anything on mouth cancer. Do you have any references on ethanol and mouth cancer?
 

Similar threads

Top