Fertility Problems In Women Could Be Due To High Cortisol

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Oct 23, 2016.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    Cortisol is highly antagonistic to progesterone - i.e. it both directly inhibits synthesis of progesterone and activates aromatase, so elevated cortisol results both in deficiency of progesterone and excess of estrogen. This human study found that women who had issues getting pregnant had elevated cortisol levels in their hair, which is indicative of long term systemic cortisol levels. According to the study, lowering cortisol can improve chances of conception.
    While the study only looked at females, I can tell you that the same is true of males. The higher a male's cortisol is the lower his sperm count and motility. And given the recent study I posted showing progesterone is vital for male fertility, this new study makes perfect sense. Progesterone is antagonistic to cortisol in both men and women and the higher its levels the more fertile either sex is.

    Hormone levels in hair may affect IVF success in women

    "...According to researchers at the University of Nottingham, elevated levels of cortisol, often referred to as the "stress hormone," may make IVF conception more difficult. In a study published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology, high concentrations of cortisol measured in hair were associated with almost a third less chance of conceiving. While saliva, urine and blood can be tested for short-term cortisol levels, hair can reveal the cumulative levels of the hormone over 3 to 6 months. Authors of the study say their findings provide the first substantial evidence cortisol, a hormone affected by lifestyle choices such as diet and exercise, directly affects reproductive outcomes. Reducing levels of cortisol, they add, can improve the chances of a successful IVF pregnancy."
     
  2. Dante

    Dante Member

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    Does this mean that hair hormone levels like for estradiol/estrogen might be more reliable for tissue exposure or chronic exposure than tests like prolactin , E1S ?
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I think there is some merit to that claim but the sulfates like E1S and DHEA-S are also long lived and if you have low/high levels of one of them on a blood test chances are this is what the systemic level is. Most doctors refuse to test for hormones in hair but I know some users here who swear by its effectiveness. Forum user @gbolduev is one of them and I think user @messtafarian also did it a few times, so hopefully they can chime in with more info.
     
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