Exercise Completely Destroys Me

Discussion in 'Exercise' started by jayUK9779, Apr 30, 2013.

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  1. jayUK9779

    jayUK9779 Member

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    I decided to go for a jog 2 days ago, wow it was a big mistake. The next day massive fatigue, brain fog and a really tight chest! Is there anyway to help your body cope with the adrenaline stress response that exercise does to the body?
     
  2. chris

    chris Member

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  3. cliff

    cliff Member

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    Try to go at a pace where your never out of breath and can comfortably breath through your nose
     
  4. Mittir

    Mittir Member

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    RP talked about benefit of concentric exercise. Here is a quote.
    " Exercise physiologists, without mentioning functional systems, have recently discovered some principles that extend the discoveries of Meerson and Anokhin. They found that "concentric" contraction, that is, causing the muscle to contract against resistance, improves the muscle's function, without injuring it. (Walking up a mountain causes concentric contractions to dominate in the leg muscles. Walking down the mountain injures the muscles, by stretching them, forcing them to elongate while bearing a load; they call that eccentric contraction.) Old people, who had extensively damaged mitochondrial DNA, were given a program of concentric exercise, and as their muscles adapted to the new activity, their mitochondrial DNA was found to have become normal.

    There are probably the equivalents of constructive "concentric" activity and destructively stressful "eccentric" activity in the brain. For example, "rote learning" is analogous to eccentric muscle contraction, and learning by asking questions is "concentric." "No bird soars too high, if he soars with his own wings." Any activity that seems "programmed" probably stifles cellular energy and cellular intelligence." _ Ray Peat
    http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/ad ... ance.shtml
     
  5. JohnS

    JohnS Member

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    Do you do this when you are surfing?
     
  6. Asimov

    Asimov Member

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    Jogging is the most damaging exercise I've ever done, and that covers a LOT of different exercises.

    Simple answer: don't jog, the juice isn't worth the squeeze (unless you're a professional marathoner)
     
  7. j.

    j. Guest

    I loved jogging when I was healthy, but I did that in high school, way before my health declined.
     
  8. OP
    jayUK9779

    jayUK9779 Member

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    Thanks for the responses, I have followed Cliffs advice as much as I could, plenty of breaks, do not over exert myself, OJ before, during and after exercise. Largest meal after exercise and I have woke up better today than last time but not 100% (still brain fog) . I love soccer and running and really dont want to give it all up :(
     
  9. wesheilman

    wesheilman Member

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    Does anyone know how to break the stress response when you overexercise? Sometimes you have to exert yourself, and I find that afterwards, my temp will drop to about 97.6, and pulse rise to around 100.

    I remember Ray saying one time to put a certain ratio of salt and sugar under your tongue in order to break the stress response, but I can't remember how much or what ratio.

    The meals I have tried haven't been able to do it yet, though it finally corrects after maybe three hours or so. Ice cream doesn't do it. Any ideas?
     
  10. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    You'll probably need an anti-stress drug; something like cyproheptadine with caffeine should do it. Caffeine by itself may do it.
     
  11. dookie

    dookie Member

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    @jayUK9779

    The sicker you are, the more important it is to avoid even mild exercise. Even long walks can be stressful.

    If I jog lightly, even for say 15 minutes, I get insomnia, edema, euphoria (cortisol effects), agitation...
     
  12. EIRE24

    EIRE24 Member

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    I can understand this. Would you get the same effects from a weights based exercise session?
     
  13. wesheilman

    wesheilman Member

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    How much caffeine would you recommend? With sugar I assume... And with a full meal?
     
  14. Morning Star

    Morning Star Member

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    I consider cardiovascular excercise to be worse than useless, likely actively harmful. If done intensely it is incredibly stressful and catabolic, if done moderately it is boring and likely of little value.
    Resistance training, if done with focus and intensity, avoiding the social hour tendencies most lifters fall prey to, will prove infinitely more beneficial than running around like a hamster on a wheel for an hour. Honestly I cannot fathom why people subject themselves to this ridiculous practice. A form of self mortification? Addiction to the stress released endorphins? A culturally reinforced stereotype that casts running in an aura of health and perfect fitness?
    I will however concede that fiber type plays a part in an athletes choice of activity, and certain individuals will find that their muscles are innately attuned to the rigors of long distance running. For such individuals, I would say yes, run, run to your hearts content. But aside from these genetically endowed persons, I would strongly caution against subjecting your body to the rigors of cardiovascular exercise.
     
  15. wesheilman

    wesheilman Member

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    Each of those things can be true for different people, and, in addition, choice of exercise is often strongly determined by personality type.

    To put it in terms of Myers-Briggs types:

    Sensory types will tend to like more physical activity, and more strenuous, and iNtuitive types less activity.
    Judging types will tend to like rote, monotonous, repetitive activities (predictability), while Perceiving types will like variation (spontaneity).
    Judging types will gravitate toward the same activity over and over (eg, running, cycling, weightlifting), whereas Perceiving types tend to want variation in activities.
    Extroverts will tend to want to do activities with others, Introverts by themselves.

    I dislike distance running. I dislike any endurance activity. But I was a fanatical athlete growing up, and loved playing sports in general. A roommate of mine is entirely non-athletic, but he loves cycling, which I find boring. I like variation, and don't like long-term focus; he likes long-term focus, and dislikes variation. (This is the P/J divide in Myers-Briggs psychology). Mind relates to body very strongly, even when it comes to energy and exercise; and there are different types of minds, and different types of bodies.
     
  16. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    One of my friends in particular (athlete who exercises 2-4 hours/day or so, regularly consumes energy drinks after his games. Many of the benefits from caffeine peak out around 300 mg, at which point you'll start impairing your ability to deal with generated ammonia.

    Try 1 cup (50 mg coffee) after your post-workout meal. If that doesn't work, try 2 (cups) 100 mg. I would say if caffeine was going to have an effect, then it would happen at >300 mg. This may hamper your ability to sleep.
     
  17. Drareg

    Drareg Member

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    Maybe check reverse T3 levels.
    Protein intake needs to be spot on.
     
  18. superhuman

    superhuman Member

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    @Drareg what have been your experience with protein? in terms of exercise and all that. How much etcc
     
  19. Drareg

    Drareg Member

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    It's the hardest thing to maintain,I try to get it every 3 hours around 30g up until around 8-9pm, I try not to do much liquids and try keep fat reasonably low so I'm limited in choice for protein, keep in mind calcium to phosphate requirement and it's more difficult.
    On top of that Peat mentioned gelatin should only be about 50 g per day so as to not upset the gut I think.

    It's hard to get to 150g and I think I do best with higher protein, when I tried pushing the time between protein intakes I got high ammonia symptoms. If I do callisthenics type workout along with work it can really take it out of you if you over do it and under eat. I learned this the hard way.

    When you do the math it's a struggle to find the time to increase protein.
     
  20. superhuman

    superhuman Member

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    @Drareg get you. What do you mean pushing the time between protein intakes? like eating more frequent then every 3 hours? why not eat say 40g each meal and have 3-4 meals?

    How do you know you get ammonia symptoms? like what are the symptoms?
     
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