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Enhanced Bioavailability And Tissue Effects Of Steroids Dissolved In Dmso

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Feb 13, 2016.

  1. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Google for "total volume of distribution". The calculation from in vitro to in vivo is involved and likely different for different chemicals. As a quick and dirty rule you can take your weight and use that as a (approximate surrogate) of volume. So, if you weigh 65kg, you can take 65L as the volume of distribution. Like I said, this is a very rough approximation and the actual volume of distribution is different for various chemicals. For instance, something lipophilic like pregnenolone or androsterone or vitamin E will have very high uptake in tissues and thus higher total volume of distribution. But the 65L would be a decent upper limit for any substance you ingest. Clearly, using that upper limit would overstimate the required in vivo dose to achieve the in vitro concentration, so YMMV. I think you can guestimate the volume of distribution of each substance based on its lipophilicity compared to a reference compound like cholesterol, for which I think the volume of distribution is known. So, if something is say only 80% as soluble in oil as cholesterol you can take the volume of distribution for that chemical to be 0.8* max_volume_of_distribution (which in this case is 65L). Obviously other factors such as metabolic speed, liver health, etc come into play as that would determine how much actual chemical reaches the blood. Some people glucuronidate extremely well and very little reaches the blood. Others are slow xenometabolizers and a lot more will reach and stay in the blood.
    Anyways, I think you get the idea.
     
  2. Wagner83

    Wagner83 Member

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    Thanks, some homework to do.
     
  3. Wagner83

    Wagner83 Member

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    Abstract


    The dipolar aprotic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide is liquid over a wide range of temperatures, is a strong electron donor, and has a high polarity. It is therefore an excellent and selective solvent for many organic and even polymeric compounds, and can enter into H-bonding and dipole-dipole association. The structure of dimethyl sulfoxide, with a “hard” oxygen atom and a “soft” sulfur atom, leads to good solvation of cations and poor solvation of anions. Mixtures of alkoxides with dimethyl sulfoxide are therefore among the most strongly basic systems in organic chemistry, and are excellently suited for the deprotonation of weakly acidic OH, NH, and CH bonds, for eliminations, and for the initiation of polymerizations.
     
  4. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I saw that one. But like I said, another one of the studies you posted said it is electron-withdrawing and Peat has said it is an oxidizing agent. So, maybe Peat can clarify on that issue. It could be that DMSO is electron donating or withdrawing depending on specific physiological conditions in the cell.
     
  5. Wagner83

    Wagner83 Member

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    Sorry if I'm the one making the mistakes but which study said it is electron withdrawing? Is it the first one from this post? https://raypeatforum.com/community/...-steroids-dissolved-in-dmso.9648/#post-207490
    From what you had said it seemed that what sparked your curiosity was the fact dmso could be electron donating.
     
  6. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Yes, I would like to hear from Peat on what the in vivo electronic effects of DMSO are expected to be. Pretty much every supplement or drug has its benefits/harm ultimately trace back to its eletron withdrawing or donating properties. Here are the studies that I had in mind for DMSO being electron acceptor.
    Dimethyl sulfoxide as an electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. - PubMed - NCBI
    DMSO reductase - Wikipedia

    Now, the above effects are reportedly seen in bacteria but I have always wondered about the properties of DMSO since Peat called it a "strong oxidizing agent". Taurine is another chemical that I think can act as EWG in humans and this has already been confirmed in bacteria.
     
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