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Endotoxins In Cheese

Discussion in 'Cheese' started by stargazer1111, Apr 19, 2017 at 9:30 PM.

  1. stargazer1111

    stargazer1111 Member

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    This may have been posted elsewhere, but I didn't see it.

    I found this study that indicates cheese may contain endotoxin.

    I know this falls in line with my experience. I can't eat anything fermentable like starch or fiber and I can't eat stuff with pre-formed endotoxin either because it causes severe gastric ulcer symptoms. I have had that pain for over a decade and suddenly realized that it goes away when I stick to whole milk, fresh juice, meat, and eggs.

    I had been doing this for a while and then decided to try cheese the other day. The pain had been gone for a while and then suddenly came back almost worse than before. I ended up with a bunch of white spots in the stool which I suspect was either undigested cheese or mucous from the damaged mucosal cells where the pain is.

    String cheese is particularly bad. It causes far worse reactions than non-string cheese. The manufacturers claim that all they do is heat it to 140 degrees and this causes it to become stringy. I don't know if that is true. When I do eat cheese, I prefer to melt it either on the stove or in the microwave. When I melt a block of store-bought cheese, it melts into a nice puddle and the oil separates out. But, when I melt string cheese like that, it becomes plastic-like and no oil comes out at all. It behaves very differently from any other cheese I have ever found. I compared the ingredients between the string cheese and the block of cheese and they were identical. It is puzzling to me.
     

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  2. Westside PUFAs

    Westside PUFAs Member

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    Very high quality cheese is hard to find and when you do it's very pricey. The labeling is dicey on true animal rennet as there are loopholes.
     
  3. stargazer1111

    stargazer1111 Member

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    No kidding. Every single package just says "enzymes." It is frustrating to me that the dogma of the vegan crowd is having such far-reaching influence that entire industries are making changes like using only non-animal rennet in cheese. Especially considering that they don't inform the consumer as to which type of rennet they use.
     
  4. Ewelina

    Ewelina Member

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    Microbial rennet is also cheap as dirt. In the UK even organic cheddar is mark as suitable for vegetarians. I don't touch this ***t. Only some continental cheeses are eatable such as Edam, Gouda, Gruyere and Comte. I think even Jarlsberg uses microbial rennet.
     
  5. Westside PUFAs

    Westside PUFAs Member

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    It's not vegans that are doing that. It's the cheese and food companies that are trying to save money because it's cheaper. There are people who I would consider silly who call themselves vegetarian who do demand cheese made with non-animal rennet but they are not the driving force behind the fake rennet. It's money. 99% of the food buying public doesn't even know what rennet is. They just like cheese and couldn't tell you the difference between real rennet cheese and fake rennet cheese. Though I'm not technically vegan myself, you will find me defending an aspect of a certain kind of vegan diet because I've seen too much evidence that it can reverse the number one killer which is heart disease. I defend such a diet for at least a therapeutic term, because reading what paleo type people and high animal product/animal fat type people say about certain plant foods is just so damn silly. The things they say about beans, greens and potatoes are just so damn crazy and just plain factually wrong. There are crazy SJW type vegans out there but to me they are neither here nor there. I'm only interested in how to feel good daily and hope for longevity and I've seen too much evidence that many plant foods help to achieve that. That doesn't mean one has to eat a vegan diet. I say vegan diet because the term veganism implies something else entirely, a political worldview that goes beyond food.

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  6. stargazer1111

    stargazer1111 Member

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    The reason I am against a vegan diet is because most vegetables I have come across taste bitter. The only way to make them palatable is by adding a bunch of stuff to mask the bitterness. Spinach is a great example. People love to talk about how healthy spinach is. However, I believe it to be incredibly toxic because of its high oxalate content. I believe this is why it tastes so bitter by itself. Chocolate is another example. Chocolate in the absence of sugar tastes so bitter that I can't swallow it. Sugar masks the bitterness. Chocolate is also high in oxalates. Iceberg lettuce (which is very low in oxalate), cooked potatoes, and carrots are the only veggies I remember consuming that were not bitter.

    Since discovering Peat, I have come more around to the philosophy of trusting my taste buds in most cases. Vegetables just don't pass the taste test for me. If it's bitter, I won't eat it.
     
  7. Westside PUFAs

    Westside PUFAs Member

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    Peat thinks cooked spinach is good: "If they are organically grown without intense nitrate fertilization and if it’s well cooked, I think spinach is good food." - RP

    "I sometimes make a magnesium supplement by boiling a pound of greens (kale, beets, spinach, etc.) in a little water, making a concentrated extract rich in magnesium.”-RP

    Boiling spinach removed about 60% of the oxalates: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/j..

    "Vegetables" is a broad term. No one can eat non-starchy vegetables as a staple because there's not enough sugar. Starch is where the sugar comes in for energy. Starchy roots and grains aren't vegetables and even legumes aren't vegetables. Vegetables like cooked greens do have many nutrients.

    Taste is not always the best guide because many peoples taste buds have become too used to the high octane flavorings of today. Taste adjusts as food adjusts. When I lower my salt intake, I notice more pleasant tastes in certain foods.

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  8. stargazer1111

    stargazer1111 Member

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    That could be. I have to depart from Ray on this one though because spinach is one of the most concentrated source of oxalate. Oxalate is purely a toxin in the body.

    There are better vegetables to eat if you are going to. Carrots being the most obvious.
     
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