End Of Antibiotics

Discussion in 'Viruses, Parasites, Fungus, Vaccines' started by jaa, Oct 25, 2013.

  1. jaa

    jaa Member

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    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline ... cs-period/

    Dr. Arjun Srinivasan is an associate director at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    "We’re in the post-antibiotic era. There are patients for whom we have no therapy, and we are literally in a position of having a patient in a bed who has an infection, something that five years ago even we could have treated, but now we can’t. …"

    "The issue with Gram negatives that I think is really important is that the Gram-negative bacteria are a large group of bacteria that generally do a very good job of developing resistance to antibiotics. …

    What do you mean?

    A lot of Gram-negative bacteria, they come out of the box, if you will, resistant to a number of important antibiotics that we might use to treat them. We’re talking about agents with names like Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, E. coli.

    These are bacteria that have historically done a very good job of very quickly developing resistance to antibiotics. They have a lot of tricks up their sleeves for developing resistance to antibiotics, so they’re a group of agents that can quickly become resistant, can pose major challenges to resistance.

    And what we’ve seen over the past decade is these Gram-negative agents becoming very rapidly more and more resistant to all of the agents that we have available to treat them.

    To all of the agents?

    There are Gram-negative bacteria that have developed resistance to everything, for which we have no viable antibiotics left to treat them. …

    So why are we so worried about these new bacteria that are Gram negatives, and what’s happened recently?

    …For a long time we’ve seen Gram negatives develop resistance to antibiotics, but we had other tricks up our sleeves. We had other antibiotics that we could use.

    Increasingly, though, what we’ve seen is that they’re developing resistance even to the agents that we’ve been sort of holding back and only using in the most serious infections. They were our last, best line of defense, and we now see some of these Gram-negative organisms that are resistant to even that last line of defense.

    What that means is that we’ve had to actually reach back into the archives, if you will. We’ve had to dust off the shelves [and revisit] some older antibiotics that we haven’t used in many, many years. We stopped using them because they were very toxic, and as new antibiotics came about that weren’t so toxic, we of course stopped using these older antibiotics."

    "… What are [the bacteria] doing? Are they hiding? Are they destroying? What are the weapons that bacteria have to fight the miracle drugs?

    Bacteria have a lot of weapons that they can use to fight off antibiotics. One of the most common ways that they fight off antibiotics is actually just destroying them. They develop what we call enzymes, which is a fancy word for saying something that can chew up, so we put the antibiotic in, and the bacteria produces a chemical that chews it up. It destroys the antibiotic. The antibiotic becomes ineffective.

    The bacteria are surrounded by a wall. They can change that wall in different ways to even prevent the antibiotics from ever getting in in the first place.

    Bacteria also have ways that they can pump the antibiotics out, so even if we can get them past the wall and get them past the chemicals that would chew them up, the bacteria then turns around and just pumps them right back out again.

    And many bacteria have more than one of these weapons simultaneously.

    …Gram negatives have all of these weapons at their disposal, and many of the highly resistant Gram negatives that we see have all of these weapons at once that they’re using.

    …What’s concerning is that what we also see with Gram negatives is that they are able to pick up weapons from their neighbors, if you will.

    I don’t understand

    Resistance, some of these weapons, are carried, if you will, by genes, so the gene is what tells the bacteria how to make the weapon. Some of these genes are now carried on little pieces of DNA that are very movable between one bacteria and another.

    What we’ve seen is that one particular bacteria will develop resistance. It will put that resistance gene onto a little piece of DNA, and it might put a whole bunch of different weapons onto a little piece of DNA. So now you’ve got one piece of DNA that has the code for several of these resistance weapons, these genes, and that can be moved to a different bacteria. …"

    "So what happened?

    It all changed several years ago. What we found is that the pace of development of new antibiotics really began to slow down about a decade ago, and now we began encountering these highly resistant infections, and we didn’t have new antibiotics to use. We had the ones that we had, but we didn’t have anything new."

    "Why? The drugs aren’t there?

    The drugs aren’t there. And we know it takes a long time to get drugs from the development stage through testing and into the market. Right now, I can’t tell you when you’re going to have a new antibiotic to treat these highly resistant Gram negatives. The best I can say is it’s probably going to be several years, but I can’t point to one that’s in development and say, “We’re going to have that one in three years.” And that’s a scary place to be in."

    "What’s the real scope of this problem that you’re worried about?

    We worry a great deal about antibody resistance among these Gram-negative organisms. The Gram negatives are a large family. They comprise many, many different types of bacteria. But within them, there’s one group of these Gram-negative bacteria that we’re especially worried about.

    It’s a family of Gram-negative bacteria that lives in our intestines, and they go by the fancy word, the Enterobacteriaceae, which comes from the root meaning “inside,” meaning they live inside of people. They live in our intestines. It’s a group of bacteria that is a very common cause of infections, both in hospitals but also in the community.

    Can you describe for me your worry about this particular category of bacteria?

    … It includes some very, very common types of bacteria that lots of people have probably heard about, including one called E. coli, which many of us have heard about as a cause of illness. …

    What we’ve seen over the last decade or so is that this group of bacteria is becoming more and more resistant to antibiotics, and over time, as resistance has continued to develop, we’ve had to use more and more powerful antibiotics to treat these Enterobacteriaceae infections, and that wasn’t an issue for us, because we always did have the next one."

    Well ****. Eat your carrot salads.
     
  2. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    Nothing new here.
    They can ask for billions of research dollars to come up with a new patentable antibiotic, or they can use MMS or colloidal silver, to which bacterias are unable to develop resistance.

    Ever.

    But as they are cheap and not patentable, we know what option they will go for...

    Take out your wallet
     
  3. OP
    jaa

    jaa Member

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    I had no idea about silver. Thanks for the info.
     
  4. 4peatssake

    4peatssake Member

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    I got very sick (could have been Lyme disease but I didn't go for testing) after being bitten by a tick and colloidal silver completely healed me. I can't tell you how sick I was and how quick this stuff works.

    I once read about a test done by students in Rochester where they filled a swimming pool with e. coli and treated it with colloidal silver. It took something like 3 days and no more e. coli. :mrgreen:
     
  5. tomisonbottom

    tomisonbottom Member

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    @burtlancast You seem to know a lot about MMS. You should edit the wiki page for it. They make it sound pretty bad, haha
    Miracle Mineral Supplement - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  6. postman

    postman Member

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    I know nothing about the subject but editing wikipedia is a waste of the time. It's hardly a neutral website, anything that is opposing mainstream narratives is swiftly deleted, doesn't matter if it's about history, politics, food, science, medicine, or anything else .
     
  7. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    What postman said.

    Take a look at what Wiki says about Burzynski:

    "there is no accepted scientific evidence of clinical efficacy of antineoplaston combinations for various diseases."

    The guy has phase 1 and 2 FDA trials completed, a dozen cases or more of incurable glioblastoma cured, and a clinic running for +40 years.
     
  8. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    @burtlancast

    I have some MMS capsules, and I was wondering if you thought these or rather colloidal silver will eliminate bacteria in the small intestine and improve IBS symptoms.
     
  9. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    I'm not sure of the rationale of sterilizing the small intestine for improving IBS: antibiotics do that routinely, and to prevent digestion troubles, people need to take probiotics with them.

    I've never heard either of using MMS for IBS; colloidal silver could potentially sterilize the small intestine, but that seems like overkill to me.

    Have you tried Ray's advice of taking raw carrot or bamboo shoots?
     
  10. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    I do a daily carrot salad, and I've been recently doing 50 grams activated charcoal before bed every other day. I still have inflammatory problems (costochondritis and receding gums) and fiber intolerance. Ray recommends thyroid, so I'm going to add some in.

    He said that he often recommends 1/4 or 1/2 dose antibiotic with a thyroid supplement, as the bacteria in the gut produce serotonin, which directly inhibits cellular respiration. I'm going to go with some oregano oil, Ceylon cinnamon, and neem when I get my hydrogen breath tests done to start.
     
  11. Don Quixote

    Don Quixote Member

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    would hydrogen peroxide work in a similar manner to MMS?
     
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