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Emotional Stress Linked To Diabetes

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Jun 7, 2016.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    Considering the direct connection between stress, cortisol, and insulin resistance, I think the link should not be surprising but apparently it is to the fellows in white coats.

    http://www.psyneuen-journal.com/article/S0306-4530(16)30134-2/abstract
    Stress-diabetes link detailed in new study

    "...A Rice University study has found a link between emotional stress and diabetes, with roots in the brain’s ability to control anxiety. That control lies with the brain’s executive functions, processes that handle attention, inhibition, working memory and cognitive flexibility and are also involved in reasoning, problem-solving and planning. The study published in Psychoneuroendocrinology establishes a metabolic chain reaction that starts with low inhibition, aka attention control, which leaves a person vulnerable to tempting or distracting information, objects, thoughts or activities. Previous studies have shown that such vulnerability can lead to more frequent anxiety, and anxiety is known to activate a metabolic pathway responsible for the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, signaling proteins that include interleukin-6 (IL-6). Along with cognitive tests that measured attention control, the Rice study measured levels of both blood glucose and IL-6 in more than 800 adults. IL-6 is a protein the body produces to stimulate immune response and healing. It is a biomarker of acute and chronic stress that also has been associated with a greater likelihood of diabetes and high blood glucose."

    "...The research showed individuals with low inhibition were more likely to have diabetes than those with high inhibition due to the pathway from high anxiety to IL-6. The results were the same no matter how subjects performed on other cognitive tests, like those for memory and problem-solving."
     
  2. Westside PUFAs

    Westside PUFAs Member

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    They don't say if the people with high blood glucose are also overweight. That would be the first thing to look at. No, not everyone who is overweight has T2D, but 90% of those with T2D are overweight. Being "stressed" will actually cause you to burn more glucose as long as you're alert. They say "Individuals with low inhibition were more likely to have diabetes than those with high inhibition due to the serial pathway from high anxious arousal to IL-6." It could be that if you're sad and depressed and you eat a meal then sit or lay down in a torpor state then glucose will stay high because you're not thinking and using your brain. But if you alert, even if you're "stressed", that shouldn't just cause what they call "diabetes" which is caused by the spillover effect from too much adipose tissue, free fatty acids in the blood and intramyocellular lipids in the muscle tissue which slow glucose metabolism. T2D is 100% curable. It's a temporary state that can be fixed by changing diet and lifestyle. I can make myself temporarily type two diabetic by eating too a large a dose of fat, yes saturated fat. Blood glucose will remain high for a day or two after such a high amount of fat. Does that mean I'm a type two diabetic? No, it just means I put myself in a T2D state, but fixed it by changing diet and lifestyle.
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    What about cortisol and its confirmed role as insulin "receptor" antagonist? Yes, if you are stressed and lean you would be burning that fat but blood glucose levels will likely be high (pre-diabetic). And God forbid you put on a little fat, then "diabetes" is pretty much assured. If you take a cortisol antagonist or inhibitor of cortisol synthesis you cannot develop diabetes even on a high-fat diet (unless it is PUFA of course). That's the reason all pharma companies have such drugs in the pipeline - i.e. they know people in the western world will continue to have a bad diet, so they need a drug that would work (almost) regardless of diet.
    So, I think the stress-diabetes connection should not be ignored since cortisol can make you insulin resistance and thus prep the groundwork for diabetes to set in once metabolism falls with age and fat accumulates.
     
  4. poilochio

    poilochio Member

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    We are talking about typ2 Diabetes right?
     
  5. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    In this study, yes. But intense stress is a known trigger of diabetes I as well.
     
  6. Nighteyes

    Nighteyes Member

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    Sorry, but I must ask if this is sarcastic or not haidut? :) trying to understand skinny fat apperance as I am quite skinny myself and have had blood sugar problems.
     
  7. poilochio

    poilochio Member

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    Yeah i got my typ1 diabetes from a real bad flu ..and i got that flu after a dentist visit with x rays
     
  8. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Which part did you think was sarcastic? I just meant to say that stress can make even lean people insulin resistant but keeping cortisol high. And while cortisol is high they will be much more prone to piling on the pounds, which contributes to the insulin resistance even more creating vicious circle. But at least if the fat you pile on is saturated it should be less of a problem to burn off. If it is PUFA then you may have to through the whole 4-year weight period for the liver to excrete it as if you trigger excessive lipolysis and flood the bloodstream with all that PUFA then all hell breaks loose including liver damage. The latter of course contributes to insulin resistance even more, and so on and so on.
     
  9. Nighteyes

    Nighteyes Member

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    Got it, thanks! It was The "god forbid you put on a little fat, then diabetes is pretty much assured" part that I was referring to.
     
  10. lexis

    lexis Member

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  11. Peatish Ninja

    Peatish Ninja Member

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    ^Incredible. Imagine the hormonal disruptions that would occur with deficient glucose in the body.
     
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