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Each Hormone Deficiency Is Associated With A Distinct Kind Of Fatigue. I Had Them All

thingsvarious

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2020
Messages
135
Hello,

I am a medical student in my last year. For a few years I have been replacing all of my major hormones (see here) and I have been both high and low in many different constellations. From all this I learned 2 things.

  1. Each hormone deficiency can cause chronic fatigue.
  2. Each hormone deficiency is associated with a distinct kind of fatigue.

I wrote a summary about the kinds of fatigue for different hormone deficiencies.
Read here: Each hormone deficiency is associated with a distinct kind of fatigue.

After years of studying, researching, experimenting, testing I did a writeup about some stuff I have learned along the way. I hope you find value in it.
 

Jing

Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2018
Messages
2,382
Hello,

I am a medical student in my last year. For a few years I have been replacing all of my major hormones (see here) and I have been both high and low in many different constellations. From all this I learned 2 things.

  1. Each hormone deficiency can cause chronic fatigue.
  2. Each hormone deficiency is associated with a distinct kind of fatigue.

I wrote a summary about the kinds of fatigue for different hormone deficiencies.
Read here: Each hormone deficiency is associated with a distinct kind of fatigue.

After years of studying, researching, experimenting, testing I did a writeup about some stuff I have learned along the way. I hope you find value in it.
What can be done to raise cortisol?
 

YourUniverse

Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2017
Messages
1,746
Location
your mind, rent free
Hello,

I am a medical student in my last year. For a few years I have been replacing all of my major hormones (see here) and I have been both high and low in many different constellations. From all this I learned 2 things.

  1. Each hormone deficiency can cause chronic fatigue.
  2. Each hormone deficiency is associated with a distinct kind of fatigue.

I wrote a summary about the kinds of fatigue for different hormone deficiencies.
Read here: Each hormone deficiency is associated with a distinct kind of fatigue.

After years of studying, researching, experimenting, testing I did a writeup about some stuff I have learned along the way. I hope you find value in it.
How to lower parathyroid hormone (PTH)?
 
T

TheBeard

Guest
The dude who tried "all diets under the sun" has now experimented with "all hormones under the sun" and can give a feedback on "all kinds of fatigue under the sun".

Just go under the sun son.
 
T

TheBeard

Guest
"Sex hormones improve sleep, so there certainly is somewhat a connection with “true” fatigue."

You sound like you never touched testosterone in your life.
I'm speaking for myself and most people I've met who used testosterone: it ***** up with your sleep big time, for two main reasons. It revs up your dopamine and cuts your melatonin production.

I feel exhausted in the morning when on testosterone, not only because it opposes cortisol, but because it prevents restorative sleep.
 
T

TheBeard

Guest
"What is more, growth hormone treatment vastly improves your sleep".

Again, you sound like you never touched real GH, or any GH at all.
We all report agitated sleep at any IU dosage, you toss and turn all night.
You wake up energetic, but after the worst sleep ever.

You are talking out of your ****.

Again, your knowledge seems to come from blogs, you never touched anything yourself.
 

b555

Member
Joined
May 30, 2020
Messages
182
"Sex hormones improve sleep, so there certainly is somewhat a connection with “true” fatigue."

You sound like you never touched testosterone in your life.
I'm speaking for myself and most people I've met who used testosterone: it ***** up with your sleep big time, for two main reasons. It revs up your dopamine and cuts your melatonin production.

I feel exhausted in the morning when on testosterone, not only because it opposes cortisol, but because it prevents restorative sleep.
I had the best sleep and waking up feeling refreshed on trt.
 
T

TheBeard

Guest
"Therapy of choice.
I would stay the hell away from gel/cream/pellet. Although convenient, with all of these DHT will rise disproportionately much."

And increasing DHT is a bad thing because...?
 

thingsvarious

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Oct 11, 2020
Messages
135
"What is more, growth hormone treatment vastly improves your sleep".

Again, you sound like you never touched real GH, or any GH at all.
We all report agitated sleep at any IU dosage, you toss and turn all night.
You wake up energetic, but after the worst sleep ever.

You are talking out of your ****.

Again, your knowledge seems to come from blogs, you never touched anything yourself.
Lol
 

milkboi

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2018
Messages
1,566
Location
Germany
"Therapy of choice.
I would stay the hell away from gel/cream/pellet. Although convenient, with all of these DHT will rise disproportionately much."

And increasing DHT is a bad thing because...?

Because medical dogma says so
 

thingsvarious

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Thread starter
Joined
Oct 11, 2020
Messages
135
@thingsvarious
What are your vitamin D levels?
I like to keep them right in the middle of the normal reference range.
Vitamin D is not a vitamin but a hormone. It acts on steroid nuclear receptors. The same way it holds for other hormones, there is a U-shaped curve when it comes to blood levels. I advice not going too high in vitamin D, because it does raise serum calcium levels quite a bit. Thus, it increases the rate of calcification, which will do damage over long periods of time to a variety of tissues (esp. arteries). What is more, an increased serum calcium depresses neuronal excitability, which tilts the equilibrium towards decreased energy levels and depression.
 
Joined
Dec 18, 2018
Messages
2,207
"Sex hormones improve sleep, so there certainly is somewhat a connection with “true” fatigue."

You sound like you never touched testosterone in your life.
I'm speaking for myself and most people I've met who used testosterone: it ***** up with your sleep big time, for two main reasons. It revs up your dopamine and cuts your melatonin production.

I feel exhausted in the morning when on testosterone, not only because it opposes cortisol, but because it prevents restorative sleep.

You are doing it transdermal, right? Maybe it is the very high DHT that comes as a side effect of transdermal application that causes issues with sleep?
 
Last edited:

Hugh Johnson

Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2014
Messages
2,018
Location
The Sultanate of Portugal
"Sex hormones improve sleep, so there certainly is somewhat a connection with “true” fatigue."

You sound like you never touched testosterone in your life.
I'm speaking for myself and most people I've met who used testosterone: it ***** up with your sleep big time, for two main reasons. It revs up your dopamine and cuts your melatonin production.

I feel exhausted in the morning when on testosterone, not only because it opposes cortisol, but because it prevents restorative sleep.
So that is why I can't sleep! As a god damn sexual tyrannosaurus, what could I do to reduce my testosterone to human levels? Without harming my health of course.
 

JKX

Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2018
Messages
371
I like to keep them right in the middle of the normal reference range.
Vitamin D is not a vitamin but a hormone. It acts on steroid nuclear receptors. The same way it holds for other hormones, there is a U-shaped curve when it comes to blood levels. I advice not going too high in vitamin D, because it does raise serum calcium levels quite a bit. Thus, it increases the rate of calcification, which will do damage over long periods of time to a variety of tissues (esp. arteries). What is more, an increased serum calcium depresses neuronal excitability, which tilts the equilibrium towards decreased energy levels and depression.
The 'rate' of calcification is dictated by stress. Not serum calcium level.
 

thingsvarious

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Thread starter
Joined
Oct 11, 2020
Messages
135
The 'rate' of calcification is dictated by stress. Not serum calcium level.
There are many many many factors that affect the rate of calcification (calcium, cortisol, T3, IGF1, endothelial injury, how macrophages respond, phosphate levels, FGF23.......)
 

JKX

Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2018
Messages
371
I like to keep them right in the middle of the normal reference range.
Vitamin D is not a vitamin but a hormone. It acts on steroid nuclear receptors. The same way it holds for other hormones, there is a U-shaped curve when it comes to blood levels. I advice not going too high in vitamin D, because it does raise serum calcium levels quite a bit. Thus, it increases the rate of calcification, which will do damage over long periods of time to a variety of tissues (esp. arteries). What is more, an increased serum calcium depresses neuronal excitability, which tilts the equilibrium towards decreased energy levels and depression.

Then perhaps you should be a little more careful with your choice of words.
 

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