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'Drunk Tank Pink' - Color's effect on the endocrine system

ALS

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Sep 3, 2017
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121
Regarding Baker-Miller Pink and its use in holding tanks:

In the late 1960s, Alexander Schauss, who now operates the American Institute for Biosocial Research in Tacoma, Washington, studied psychological and physiological responses to the color pink.[4][5] Schauss had read studies by the Swiss psychiatrist Max Lüscher, who believed that color preferences provided clues about one's personality. Luscher noticed that color preferences shifted according to psychological and physiological fluctuations in his patients. Luscher asserted that color choice reflects emotional states. He theorized that one's color choices reflect corresponding changes in the endocrine system, which produces hormones. Schauss then postulated that the reverse might also be true; color might cause emotional and hormonal changes, and various wavelengths of light could trigger profound and measurable responses in the endocrine system.

In early tests in 1978, Schauss observed that color did affect muscle strength, either invigorating or enervating the subject, and even influenced the cardiovascular system.[4] Schauss began to experiment on himself, with the help of his research assistant John Ott. He discovered that a particular shade of pink had the most profound effect. He labeled this tone of pink "P-618".[6] Schauss noted that by merely staring at an 18 × 24 inch card printed with this color, especially after exercising, there would result "a marked effect on lowering the heart rate, pulse and respiration as compared to other colors."

In 1979, Schauss managed to convince the directors of a Naval correctional institute in Seattle, Washington to paint some prison confinement cells pink in order to determine the effects this might have on prisoners. Schauss named the color after the Naval correctional institute directors, Baker and Miller. Baker-Miller Pink is now the official name of the color.[4]

At the correctional facility, the rates of assault before and after the interior was painted pink were monitored. According to the Navy's report, "Since the initiation of this procedure on 1 March 1979, there have been no incidents of erratic or hostile behavior during the initial phase of confinement". Only fifteen minutes of exposure was enough to ensure that the potential for violent or aggressive behavior had been reduced, the report observed.[2]

 

Kykeon

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Mar 22, 2019
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160
Do you know about the red dress effect? also very interesting. I read some study a while ago that said if women wear red or black on their profile pictures (online dating data assessment iirc) then there is a higher tendency to seek a short term relationship.

My n=1 experiment of the red dress effect (as male) confirms it. Sadly i can not go into nightclubs anymore right now. Was always fun to experiment there :D. Red Cars also get stopped more often by the police but it is likely pseudoscience. Red Sales folders seem to increase the closing potential.

Black suits make you also look more intelligent than for example a red suit. I wasnt allowed to wear fancy colors when i worked in the insurance business as a youngster, or better to say my mentor didnt recommended it.
very interesting topic altogether.

There is also reference to watching certain colored disks in the buddhist traditions. I found this very interesting when i found out about it.
 

ALS

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Sep 3, 2017
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121
"Do you know about the red dress effect?"

I recall a red dress being used in 'The Matrix' but of course everyone else in that scene had on neutral colors.

Fast food places once upon a time made liberal use of orange. The idea was it would cause people to eat fast and leave instead of hanging around.
I don't know why they stopped that. It's not seen as much anymore.

There was a place near where I live called The Royal Fork, an all you could eat buffet that had a spinning fork sign.
Garish orange and purple interior, enhanced by very bright lighting. Didn't stop some people from sitting there all day and eating, though.
They're still in business, but have changed their interior colors to more subtle ones.
 

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