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Drinking Beer For Lactic Acic As An Anti-Metabolic Solution

Discussion in 'Metabolism' started by yerrag, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    The title may sound like me trolling, but I'm not.

    I understand that this forum is very much about improving metabolism, as a higher metabolism provides the energy for our body to think and to act, as well as for us to maintain our body processes that support life, in fighting cancer, in providing immunity, in healing, and repair and regeneration.

    But I have for awhile now been entertaining the idea that pro-metabolic solutions do not always resolve issues that people experience. I actually have been experiencing worsening metrics based on a certain marker when I take pro-metabolic substances, or do things that are pro-metabolic.

    I have asked in an earlier post if there's a way that carbon dioxide can reduced in my blood, of which I got no response, and half-expected it, as this isn't a normal ask and besides, who in his right mind wants to reduce his serum CO2, when CO2 aids the release of oxygen to the body tissues?

    It dawned on me one day when I had beer before turning in and I slept well. I didn't drink milk anymore, as I normally would, as beer and milk don't mix well in the tummy. However, I thought how bad it would be if I drank beer instead of milk before turning in each night. Yeah, all that lactic acid!

    But tonight, I will start drinking beer instead of milk and see what it does to me. Will I continue to sleep soundly? And more importantly, will drinking beer lead to an increase in lactic acid in my blood, and consequently, lead to lower CO2 in my blood? And with lower CO2, will my blood be able to release less oxygen to my tissues? And if so, I am on the right track.

    As some of you may already know, my issue is hypertension. When I take pro-metabolic stuff (such as k2, niacinamide, coffee, etc) and do pro-metabolic activities like Buteyko breathing, the result confounds everyone. My blood pressure increases instead of going down. Over time, my observations lead me to conclude that my body is resisting attempts to increase my metabolism. And it is doing it by constricting my blood vessels in order to minimize full oxygenation of my tissues, or a tissue.

    This tissue is my kidney tissues. Which has lead toxicity. The oxidative stress stemming from this could destroy my kidneys, and my body wants to neutralize these stresses in the way I think it knows how to. By producing enough uric acid, which is an antioxidant the body can produce in significant quantities. Perhaps it is our "vitamin c," which most animals can produce but which human can't. In order to produce uric acid for my needs, the body has to induce a state of hypoxia near the kidney tissues at risk of being destroyed by lead's oxidative stresses. When the rest of the body is fully revved up to oxygenate the tissues, the blood vessels in the kidney have to exert more effort to counter the maximal-oxygenation mode, and they respond by further constricting the blood vessels local to the kidney tissues. In doing so, blood pressure is increased further.

    Since plenty of blood goes through the kidneys, the effect is a general systemic increase in blood pressure for me.

    This is a theory that I'm basing on to approach how to reduce my blood pressure. And this is my context. My thinking is that I have to lower my serum CO2, so that this would lower the level of tissue oxygenation in my body. This would be anti-metabolic, but this may work towards lessening the need of the blood vessels in my kidneys to constrict. Relieved of the need to constrict as much, my blood pressure may go down as a result.

    Since increasing lactic acid intake by drinking beer could lead to lessening CO2 content to the blood, I may find my blood pressure going lower by simply drinking beer. There also is kefir, as well as kimchi.

    Just for the record, I am not planning to do this forever. This is a stopgap solution. I'm taking magnesium and vitamin C to chelate lead out of my kidneys. A short-term aid that is counter-intuitive may just be the right complement to the long-term solution of using magnesium and vitamin C to rid myself of hypertension.

    I could very well be wrong on this. But I really hope I'm not.

    Comments?
     
  2. dookie

    dookie Member

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    @yerrag

    Beer is estrogenic, so it puts you to sleep because of estrogen's "opioid"-like effects. But estrogen produces a superficial, non-restorative sleep. Likewise, estrogen will drop your metabolic rate, so heart rate and blood pressure would also drop.

    Why do you think you have lead toxicity? It seems to me, lead toxicity is like "Lyme disease", alternative health doctors love to push it as an alternative "diagnosis", but unless you have been working in factory where you were directly exposed to lead, you should doubt that as a factor for any of your problems. Hair mineral tests and such are not reliable. For diagnosing lead toxicity, your urine or blood lead content should be something like 10 times the normal limit
     
  3. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I have already taken a provoked challenge test with a chelating agent, not sure whether it was EDTA or DMPS o DMSA. It was 8 years ago already, and it confirmed that I have lead toxicity. So there is no doubt about the lead toxicity. I understand that you're questioning the premise, as that is a good vetting process to make sure that I'm not leading myself on a wrong path, but the lead toxicity diagnosis is well-founded and it is a good basis to work from. Without knowing the underlying cause of my hypertension, it is easy to lump me into a non-lead toxic category with solutions that have proven to only exacerbate my high blood pressure.

    I don't even think my situation is unique, as it's not just exposure to lead at factories that would cause lead toxicity. Many old homes have copper pipes, and joints are soldered with lead. Many just don't realize they have lead toxicity, as the test for it is not common, and not likely to be paid for by insurance. Not all tests are accurate, and there would be many false negatives, which just leads people down the wrong path with a faulty premise. Most simply accept their hypertension as being "essential," which is just another way of saying the cause is unknown, and resign themselves to taking prescription medication forever. As I had explained earlier, the high blood pressure in my mind is manifestation of the body acting in a way to protect me from the damaging effects of lead toxicity. If I were to just take medication to lower my blood pressure, I would only get the appearance of having normal blood pressure but not necessarily being better for it because I may have lost the protection associated with the high blood pressure.

    It is common for people to want to take medication to lower blood pressure. It has never been proven that the outcome would be better if blood pressure medication were taken. If people can question letting a fever run its course, instead of artificially lowering it, it should also be within the bounds of reason to question the sagacity of taking blood pressure medication just for the sake of having normal blood pressure, without any investigation as to what is causing the high blood pressure.
     
  4. Mito

    Mito Member

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    CO2 is a confusing subject. Wasn’t the conclusion of this thread (Bicarbonate Vs. PaCO2 Blood Tests) that we want the CO2 that is measured in the blood on a basic metabolic panel to be on lower end of the range, not the high end of the range?
     
  5. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I should have been more specific. I was referring to serum CO2 and not serum bicarbonate.
     
  6. Mito

    Mito Member

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  7. Lucenzo01

    Lucenzo01 Member

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    Beer is a great source of B-vitamins al alcohol is healthy in moderate ammounts so yeah, it's normal that you feel good on beer. It's easy to digest and you probably have low stomach acid like 99% of the population, so it's normal that you don't do great on milk.
     
  8. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    This subject is confusing to me admittedly. All I know is that there are three components to serum total carbon dioxide - dissolved CO2, carbonic acid, and bicarbonate. At any given time, the dissolved CO2 is what matters as far as the ability of blood to release oxygen to the tissues. The more dissolved CO2, the more easily oxygen will be released to the tissues. Carbonic acid and bicarbonate, as far as blood pH is concerned, acts as buffers to maintain the blood pH within a certain range around 7.4 pH. The buffering system keeps the blood from getting too acidic. The lungs and the kidneys do their part towards this goal. Excess carbonic acid is converted into carbon dioxide in the lungs, where it is exhaled. Excess bicarbonate is released through the kidneys through urine. The reduction of carbonic acid through the lungs has a fast reaction time, whereas the reduction of bicarbonate through the kidneys would take as long as 3 days. Carbonic anhydrase, also enables the conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. This is as I understand it.

    So, even if total serum CO2 (Co2, carbonic acid, and bicarbonate) is comprised mostly of bicarbonate, bicarbonate by itself cannot be a determinant in itself of dissolved serum CO2 (not to be confused with carbonic acid), which has a direct effect on how easily blood releases oxygen to the body's tissues. Since serum lactic acid also affects the blood pH, and thus affect the buffering system comprised of carbonic acid and bicarbonate, it would also affect the amount of dissolved CO2 in the blood.

    In drinking beer, and in so doing effect the eventual increase of serum lactic acid, I would hope to downregulate the amount of dissolved serum CO2, so as to downregulate the release of oxygen to the tissues. In so doing, I would also downregulate my metabolism. But downregulating my metabolism isn't the goal, but a consequence of my attempt to lower the delivery of oxygen to the tissues, so that my kidneys won't have to force the contraction of blood vessels that leads to an increase in blood pressure.

    EDIT: I failed to mention that as serum lactic acid increases, I believe that serum carbonic acid would decrease in order to maintain blood pH. With lower carbonic acid, I think that serum CO2 will correspondingly decrease.
     
  9. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I actually do great on milk though. I very seldom, if not ever, have gut issues. And yes, I also feel good on beer or at least don't experience any adverse reaction to it. I'm hoping that drinking it will increase lactic acid in my blood, and as the previous post explains, will help lower my blood pressure.

    On the second day of waking up after a glass of beer before bed, I experienced lower metabolism at 59 bpm heart rate. Will see as the week goes along.
     
  10. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    On 3 separate night I took my blood pressure before drinking beer, and an hour later took measurements again. Here are the results

    1. 199/127 to 171/107
    2. 191/110 to 168/100
    3. 196/129 to 178/105

    I'm unable to show you a control set of values, where I took readings without drinking beer, but I have noticed though that without beer the blood pressure reductions were not significant.

    But for me, it is sufficient proof that drinking beer lowers my blood pressure. I think it is the lactic acid causing my blood pressure to drop. To confirm this, I should replace beer with kefir, and on another test, replace it with kim chi. If all of these would lower my blood pressure, I should try having all of them. Kefir for breakfast, kim chi for lunch, and beer for dinner.
     
  11. TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Is your daily intake of calcium atleast 2000 mg? How about your magnesium intake and potassium intake?

    Ray Peat said hypertensives should be on atleast 2000 mg of calcium per day. Eggshell calcium is the safest due to studies showing it had the lowest amount of heavy metals compared to other calcium supplements.

    Also the RDA for potassium is 4700 mg a day. Chances are you probably don't reach that number from the diet.

    Also magnesium, a very important anti-hypertensive mineral is very low in western food and should be supplemented at atleast 1000 mg a day. Glycinate is one of the best forms.
     
  12. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I may need to work on increasing my calcium. Since I stopped drinking coffee (the increased metabolism increases my blood pressure), I've also reduced my eggshell intake as I sprinkle eggshell on the froth of my coffee.
     
  13. TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Yes and don't underestimate potassium's importance either when it comes to hypertension!
     
  14. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I finally understand why Buteyko breathing increases my blood pressure. The increase in CO2 and bicarbonate in the blood increases the intrarenal vascular blood flow:

    The Bicarbonate-Deficiency-Syndrome (BDS): Professor Dr. med. Klaus F. Kopp

    J. Schnermann therein described the feed-back mechanism in the kidney between the intrarenal vascular blood flow, urine-volume and the urinary concentration of either NaCl or NaHCO3. This phenomenon is known since under the name of the Director of the Institute of Physiology at that time Klaus Thurau, as the THURAU-MECHANISM. It is the evidence of a close interrelationship between the arterial bloodflow or the oxygenation of tissues and the Acid-Base-Balance: the lesser the acidosis, the better will be the arterial tissue perfusion.

    However, this goes against my kidney's need for hypoxia, which favors uric acid production, to protect it from the oxidative stresses of lead toxicity. So the kidney resists the increased blood flow, and this leads to higher blood pressure.

    I want to say that it's not wise to increase lactic acid to lower my metabolism. I was driven largely by a desire to lower my blood pressure, and a lower metabolism can help achieve that. But it has costs to it that far outweighs the benefit.
     
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