• Due to excessive bot signups along with nefarious actors we are limiting forum registration. Keep checking back for the register link to appear. Please do not send emails or have someone post to the forum asking for a signup link. Until the current climate changes we do not see a change of this policy. To join the forum you must have a compelling reason. Letting us know what skills/knowledge you will bring to the community along with the intent of your stay here will help in getting you approved.

Does the mere action of gripping an object firmly reduce serotonin ?

JamesGatz

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2021
Messages
973
Location
USA
I believe I recall a quote I read by RP that said something along the lines of when speaking about serotonin in dogs - I believe it was a situation where they needed to restrain the dog - that if the dog was given something hard to clamp down on (like a bone) then their serotonin would lower and they would relax - I cannot find the quote anywhere when searching but I do vividly remember reading it - if someone has the quote please attribute it to this thread - I do not want people to take my word for it because I don't want to say attribute something to him that I am not 100% sure on


b3443b26404a88f32b2e3fc86b5a3e4a.jpg


I notice that when im riding a scooter or a bike (before I even begin to ride - as soon as I grip the handlebars firmly on the vehicle I feel serotonin lower - I recall one of my co-workers from years back used to have one of those grippers to grip things with - used to be pretty popular in my city - I was wondering do users have the same relaxation effects when gripping something in situations that require it (i.e. like when you grip on a barbell or grip on a bike or something of this nature)

5c18a6b3-e771-4226-843e-89f5f1ee6bb1_1.59ae90bca3c6fd6f73b69977bcdd2984.jpg
 
Last edited:

JamesGatz

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Jun 22, 2021
Messages
973
Location
USA
Probably so, I think this is what you're referring to btw. Timestamped.

View: https://youtu.be/sXkxViFxk9A?t=2026

Yes! Extremely interesting stuff I feel like maybe the action of exerting a force gets this energy out and the serotonin-lowering effects - gripping an object I find similar to chewing of clamping down in terms of mental effects - it's an interesting and simple concept
 

Ignoramus

Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2020
Messages
159
This makes me think about how various squeezing/stimming toys are given to autistic people to help them to focus and calm down. Serotonin levels are significantly higher in the guts of autistic people.
 

Kayaker

Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2018
Messages
1,060
I think having something to do makes one feel less helpless, thus reduces serotonin. Cursing may reduce stress through a similar mechanism because one subconsciously believes that they are doing something. On the other hand, facial paralysis increases depression because one is unable to express themselves.
 

Andman

Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2017
Messages
747
pretty sure its more along the lines of cns activation (esp with the grippers) similar to doing jumps/sprints or even warmup sets for lifting
 

Marcine

Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2019
Messages
195
Location
Ecuador
I knit or crochet several hours every day and I'm pretty sure it works the same way you're speaking to.
 

David PS

Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2016
Messages
1,289
Your idea seems plausible to me. I perform 2 or 3 sets of 2 minute isometric holds with hand grips similar to the image shown in this thread. I do this to keep my blood pressure low. see Isometric handgrip exercise training attenuates blood pressure in prehypertensive subjects at 30% maximum voluntary contraction.

Serotonin has been known to have an influence on blood pressure (among other things). From Ray Peat's article Tryptophan, serotonin, and aging:
Serotonin's contribution to high blood pressure is well established. It activates the adrenal cortex both directly and through activation of the pituitary. It stimulates the production of both cortisol and aldosterone. It also activates aldosterone secretion by way of the renin-angiotensin system. Angiotensin is an important promoter of inflammation, and contributes to the degeneration of blood vessels with aging and stress. It can also promote estrogen production.

Edit :
33:46 - Mitigating stress by doing something about it
35:21 - The “youth-associated” hormones — serotonin antagonists
 
Last edited:

opethfeldt

Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2017
Messages
619
Interesting theory. I find clenching my fist to be very relaxing and I do it all the time out of habit. I hadn't made a serotonin connection though. This certainly explains the popularity of stress balls.
 

Similar threads

Top