Does Sugar Raise Adrenaline? And What Causes Hypodypsia (lack Of Thirst)

Discussion in 'Ask For Help or Advice' started by TreasureVibe, Aug 27, 2020.

  1. TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Hey all, I have 2 questions, the first is, does sugar raise adrenaline? And the second, what could be the cause of hypodypsia (lack of thirst)?

    Thank you
     
  2. ThinPicking

    ThinPicking Member

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    Interesting question. I did some digging on thirst, hypodipsia, fluid balance, body fluid dynamics and SIADH some time ago after feeling it myself.

    In my experience antagonising vasopressin too much is a factor.
    For example too much hypotonic fluid, too many recreational drugs (all the good drugs do it), not enough (nutritious) solutes. These things will screw with the bodies set points. A kind of rebound SIADH/hypodipsic state.

    Not to mention "thirst" can be a weirdly unconscious sensation.

    Body fluid changes, thirst and drinking in man during free access to water - PubMed
     
  3. ThinPicking

    ThinPicking Member

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    Are you experiencing anxiety temporarily relieved by water?
     
  4. OP
    TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    I'm asking for a friend, and no she does not experience this.

    Do you know if sugar raises adrenaline?
     
  5. Jessie

    Jessie Member

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    The evidence appears to be confusing to say the least. Ray Peat and Danny support the idea that sugar lowers adrenaline. Paul Jaminet seems to believe sugar raises adrenaline. And both sides actually cite evidence to support their claims.

    In my opinion, I think the devil is in the details. If you can store glycogen well, then I think sugar will probably lower adrenaline. People that aren't storing glycogen well would benefit more from a carbohydrate that triggers a much bigger insulin release then sugar, like starch. This is because insulin is one of the few substances that can actually inhibit fat oxidation directly.

    Insulin and adrenaline are diametrically opposed to one another. So in my opinion there's no right or wrong answer here, it's more about context of one's current health state, or more specifically, the current state of one's liver. If you handle sugar badly, then it's likely a sign of poor liver function.
     
  6. ImprovingDaily

    ImprovingDaily Member

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    I think I'm in the bad liver boat. Sugar tends to make me feel not great, but Saturated Fats like Cocoa Butter help me go towards normalcy. Any suggestions for Liver health besides caffeine?
     
  7. Flo93

    Flo93 Member

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    Angiotensin II strongly promotes the feeling of thirst.
     
  8. Jessie

    Jessie Member

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    Choline, protein, caffeine, vitamin K2, glycine, are the go-to things for improving liver health.

    Some less common things you could try are anti-serotonin, anti-endotoxin drugs like cyproheptadine or benadryl. Their anti-fibrotic effects could be useful.

    Taurine, biotin, and H2 antagonists (famotidine) can all be used to restore the liver's ability to hold glycogen.
     
  9. ImprovingDaily

    ImprovingDaily Member

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    Awesome, thanks! I have used or am using a lot of those substances, but I feel like protein might be what's holding me back.
     
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