Do Our Mitochondria Run At 50 Degrees C?

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by nigma, Oct 12, 2018.

  1. nigma

    nigma Member

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    https://phys.org/news/2018-01-mitochondria-degrees.html
    upload_2018-10-12_21-35-39.png

    Not sure if this has been covered yet, didn't find anything after a quick search of the forum.

    This is really interesting as it fits with the ideas of Ray Peat, Gilbert Ling and Gerald Pollack. Body temp of 37 C is created by what is usually considered as inefficiency of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, i.e. rather than all the sugar and fat energy going into producing ATP, some is 'lost' to heat. However Lings idea of cell water resting in organized layers are now shown to be generated by the infrared energy coming off the 50 C mitochondria. Pollack has found that infrared light builds what he calls exclusion zone (EZ) layers of water when next to a hydrophilic surface, he uses a gel 'nafion' that has a very hydrophilic surface.

    Nafion
    [​IMG]

    As you can see, this stuff is very electronegative due to the F, S and O atoms, meaning it is electron deficient, this property causes the highly dipole water molecules to orient when against the surface of this material. When infrared light is shined on this gel in water, the EZ layers are seen to increase substantially. Infrared light can also be viewed as heat since water has long been known to absorb in the infrared part of the EM spectrum, but it wasn't previously known what happened to the absorbed infrared energy, it was probably just assumed to vibrate the molecules and diffuse away. We feel heat because we are made up of water that absorbs infrared light, which then builds up EZ layers within our cells, supplementing the energy produced by the mitochondria. I don't think it is fully known what the role of the structured intra-cellular water is, I can speculate that maybe it allows ions and/or molecules to travel through it faster than disorganized bulk water, since the mitochondria need substrates constantly streaming into them.

    Does anyone know what the membrane of the mitochondria looks like chemically? I do know it is supposed to be negatively charged.
     
  2. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    I wonder if the "temperature" can be even higher if looking at individual molecules in the mitochondria.
     
  3. OP
    nigma

    nigma Member

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    They do call what they used as a molecular thermoprobe, which is probably getting as close as you can to measuring individual molecules. I think the problem is temperature is normally conceived as a bulk property of some collection of particles.
     
  4. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    Nice thanks
     
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