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Dietary Nitrate / Nitrite Acutely Inhibits Metabolism

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Mar 4, 2014.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    The studies were specifically about the dreaded NO, which we know Peat is not a fan since it is one of the major (neuro)toxins in the body. The bodybuilding and sports community in general are popping arginine/citruline pills like crazy hoping that the increase in NO will be beneficial to their bodies and physical/mental performance. The latest studies seem to confirm that arginine/citruline do work as expected in increasing NO, but that has a profound negative effect on metabolism and inhibits RMR (and O2 consumption) by over 4% almost immediately after consumption. While the studies focus on supplements boosting NO, they also discuss the variety of nitrate/nitrite rich vegetables like spinach and beets, and say that consuming those vegetables will probably have the same effect as the pills.
    So, be mindful of how much nitrate/nitrite rich foods you are consuming!

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24500154

    "...The RMR was 4.2% lower after nitrate compared with placebo administration, and the change correlated strongly to the degree of nitrate accumulation in saliva (r2 = 0.71). The thyroid hormone status, insulin sensitivity, glucose uptake, plasma concentration of isoprostanes, and total antioxidant capacity were unaffected by nitrate. The administration of nitrite to human primary myotubes acutely inhibited respiration."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21284982

    "...We conclude that dietary nitrate has profound effects on basal mitochondrial function."
     
  2. Vinero

    Vinero Member

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    I usually eat a bit of spinach a few days a week for the vitamin k as I am taking around 1000 mg of aspirin each day.
    Probably nothing to worry about right? Since I'm already taking large amounts of BCAA's with my regular protein to lower tryptophan and consequently nitric oxide, the little bit of spinach that contains nitrate won't matter. I eat 3 meals a day consisting of 100 gram of red meat + 10 gram BCAA. This large amount of BCAA (10g per meal) significantly reduces absorption of tryptophan in the red meat.
     
  3. Kray

    Kray Member

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    I would like to know the pros/cons between BCAA vs gelatin taken with red meat to reduce the tryptophan. I hadn't read about the BCAA before and always assumed gelatin was Peat's main suggestion to balance out the AAs in the meats. Does gelatin not provide the benefit of tryp reduction?

    For older women in menopause, have you read anything about need to limit red meat consumption? I feel like I'm not getting enough protein because I've cut back on meats due to the iron buildup issue. I also have sensed from reading Peat that he doesn't necessarily push lots of muscle meats on a daily basis. I see you consume quite a bit, but I also assume you are male. Most of my protein in a given day comes from some dairy-- Gk yogurt, cottage cheese, cheese, milk-- and only one meal with meat of some kind, probably about 3oz worth. I'm also worried about all the dairy and the tryp levels in it, so either way I am interested in making sure I can keep my levels of tryp down and the best most practical way to do so (keeping in mind I have to feed a family of 6!). Is there a sure sign of tryp overload?

    Do you know if there is a range suggested for total protein for older meno women, or women by weight (120lbs)?

    Thanks for your input. :|
     
  4. Parsifal

    Parsifal Member

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    I wonder if by boiling leaves for getting potassium/magnesium, the nitrates/nitrites would leak into the water?
     
  5. X3CyO

    X3CyO Member

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  6. Makaveli

    Makaveli Member

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    Should we be concerned about eating too much watermelon because of NO? It's a pretty good source of magnesium.
     
  7. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2267556

    "Nitrates and nitrites in the diets reduced the utilization of beta-carotene in a dose-dependent way. The nitrate reduced the utilization of the provitamins by from about 50% to over 60%, and the nitrite reduced it by from over 60% to about 80%."
    __
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7777773

    "High levels of nitrate was encountered in lettuce, frozen spinach, fennel, radishes, parsley. Many of this samples contained more than 1000 mg of KNO3/kg of fresh product, but the highest level, over the 3500 mg/kg was found in lettuce. The remaining vegetables like carrots, celery, leeks and frozen French bean contained from several dozen to more than 800 mg KNO3/kg. The level of nitrite in all samples of the investigated vegetables and fruits was very low from zero to decimal part of milligram per kg. Very low level of nitrate was found in 7 species of investigated apples (from 1.3 to 9.7 mg KNO3/kg). A little higher level of this compound was ascertained in currants, gooseberries, raspberries, cherries (from 0.0 to 36.0 mg KNO3/kg product). The highest levels of nitrate occurred in samples of strawberries (maximum to 322.3 mg KNO3/kg) but mean level amounted 58.7 mg KNO3/kg. The encountered levels of nitrate in frozen vegetables and fruits as well as in jams and stewed fruits was only little less than in fresh products."

    "In the juice prepared from blanched carrot, the rate of the reduction of nitrate to nitrite has not been lowered, when this product was storage of this juice at room temperature, the mean level of nitrite increased significantly (from 0.14 to 82.89 mg NaNO2/kg) and the level of nitrate lowered from 261.0 to 46.4 mg KNO3/kg. It should be strongly recommended for consumption the juices from carrot only fresh prepared."​

    @burtlancast @Wagner83
     
  8. chrismturner89

    chrismturner89 Member

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    I have been drinking vast amounts of beetroot juice and while I get amazingly clear skin from it (perhaps due to its effects on liver) I feel like it might be raising nitric oxide levels too much. Any strategies for lowing NO pretty quickly?
     
  9. chrismturner89

    chrismturner89 Member

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    I have been drinking vast amounts of beetroot juice and while I get amazingly clear skin from it (perhaps due to its effects on liver) I feel like it might be raising nitric oxide levels too much. Any strategies for lowing NO pretty quickly?
     
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