Dietary Emulsifiers Promote Colitis And Metabolic Syndrome

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by sm1693, Mar 10, 2015.

  1. sm1693

    sm1693 Member

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    Emulsifiers are not looking good for intestinal health.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25731162

    Milk with added vitamins is probably the worst offender for emulsifiers in the Ray Peat world. The worst part is that apparently you don't have to include the emulsifier on the label for the product.

    This is from the US Department of Health, Pasteurized Milk Ordinance:

    "TYPE OF CONCENTRATES AVAILABLE
    A number of different types of concentrates are available. All contain vitamin D and/or vitamin A palmitate with a carrier consisting of any of the following: butter oil, corn oil, evaporated milk, non-fat dry milk, polysorbate 80, propylene glycol and glycerol monooleate. It is best to store all concentrates under refrigeration unless manufacturer’s directions indicate otherwise. To achieve adequate dispersion, viscous concentrates should be brought to room temperature before addition."

    On the milk label it just says: Vitamin A Palmitate, Vitamin D3. What a scam.


    I was hoping that the farmers cheese making process got rid of the emulsified vitamins but it appears like it does not.

    http://www.nutraceuticalsworld.com/cont ... ification/


    We have a relatively new local milk here in Austin: MillKing. It is un-homogenized, 1% fat, low-temp pasteurized, no added vitamins or other crap. Half of the time it is completely sold out of the stores while the ultra pasteurized garbage milk sits on the shelf gathering dust. I was drinking MillKing but then stopped months ago due to cost. My thyroid appears to have already improved since I switched back to it a few days ago.
     
  2. Waremu

    Waremu Member

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    I have completely stopped consuming dairy that has added vitamins to it recently. I didn't react badly to organic store-bought skim and low fat milk, but I just don't trust these companies and I think the risk isn't worth it. Thankfully, I am able to get grass fed raw milk from a farm where I live and I just found out tonight that a store near me sells organic whole milk which is not homogenized, meaning no added vitamins, which is great. So for me it is that or Greek yogurt, or maybe some select cheeses. when it comes to dairy without added vitamins.
     
  3. barbwirehouse

    barbwirehouse Member

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    My milk doesn't have vitamins added luckily.

    How bad are the emulsifiers in ice cream? Like carrageen... apparently they're bad but I can only find ice cream here with carrageen.
     
  4. jyb

    jyb Member

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    Emulsifiers like carrageen?! That's a bit like asking how bad pufa are while snorting some fish oils :lol:
     
  5. barbwirehouse

    barbwirehouse Member

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    Hey man... like every commercial ice cream has it.
     
  6. Zachs

    Zachs Member

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    Well that sucks. The only grass-fed non vitamin milk I can get is whole fat. That's a lot of extra fat. :/

    Three Twins ice cream is the best I can find around here.
     
  7. Zachs

    Zachs Member

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    So pectin and gelatin are also emulsifiers, I'm guessing that all emulsifiers are not created equal?
     
  8. Strongbad

    Strongbad Member

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    Darn it, that's the type of milk I've been consuming: Vitamin A Palmitate, Vitamin D3 on the label. You'd think that shopping in Sprouts will filter out those types of products, but guess not...

    There's a lot of controversy surrounding the safety of raw milk. What's your guys take on it? I like the nutrient benefits of it but I read around that it's also risky.
     
  9. Zachs

    Zachs Member

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    I don't think there is any risk at all to raw milk if you can find a legit source with excellent milking practices. As long as the cows are healthy and there is no fecal contamination, raw milk is a big step up.
     
  10. jyb

    jyb Member

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    Haagen Dazs vanilla doesn't. Not that I think HG is cheap or healthy, the dairy they use is unlikely to be good quality, but clearly not nearly as bad as most others. To make ice cream, you only need a few ingredients like dairy, eggs, sugar. Any added stuff like carageenan is completely insane. But yeah, almost every milk or ice cream brand at the store is heavily processed or has additives. That's here in the UK, but in the US it is way, way worse, I remember visiting those "luxury" ice cream shops selling their own brands only to read a list 10+ ingredients including pufa and carageenan.
     
  11. OP
    sm1693

    sm1693 Member

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    There are naturally occurring emulsifiers.

    In researching this, I kept running into polysorbate 80. Not positive, but it seems like it is the most prevalent emulsifier for milk vitamins. Do a quick google search for polysorbate 80 health effects and prepare to be disappointed in humanity.
     
  12. OP
    sm1693

    sm1693 Member

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    I am now of the opinion that raw milk has earned its reputation for healing digestion simply because of its lack of emulsified allergenic vitamins, not necessarily its other properties. But if ever given the choice, I would love to consume it (as long as I could defat most of it somehow).

    I'm actually considering moving to California because of the altitude possibilities and the freely available raw milk.
     
  13. jyb

    jyb Member

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    You mean just that it's not homogenised? That seems bad enough.
     
  14. barbwirehouse

    barbwirehouse Member

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    How's that bad? :roll:
     
  15. OP
    sm1693

    sm1693 Member

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    No, a very mild anaphylaxis reaction to the added vitamins is what I suspect constantly disturbs digestion, but just a guess. The problem seems to be that it's so mild that people can't take RP's advice on avoiding allergenic milk because they can't point a definitive finger at milk for this mild/constant digestion upset.

    You are right that homogenization seems crazy and useless. I always thought this was mandatory too, but it appears that homogenization and vitamin A/D addition are all completely voluntary for the milk companies. I believe vitamin A addition is only mandatory if claims are made on the label, such as "low fat, reduced fat or fat free."

    They homogenize because it increases shelf-life. I believe companies fortify with vitamins specifically so that they can market it as "fortified."
     
  16. tara

    tara Member

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    And egg yolk.
     
  17. tara

    tara Member

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    There are a few too many ifs in there for me to count it as no risk. Quite possibly low and reasonably risk, and positive benefit to risk ratio for many people.
     
  18. tara

    tara Member

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    Same here, most of the milk doesn't have added vitamins, but all the ice-cream has carrageenan. I occasionally indulge in a little, for the sake of not driving myself crazy with restriction, but not regularly. One day I'll get an ice-cream machine.:):.
     
  19. Dean

    Dean Member

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    I suspect the emulsifiers are the reason I can't handle no or reduced fat "fresh" milk at all. Low fat cottage cheeses always bothered me as well. Strangely enough, low fat string cheese and non-fat milk powder don't bother me. I'm assuming different types of emulsifiers are used in liquid products than solids and dry powders.
     
  20. OP
    sm1693

    sm1693 Member

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    I had a very similar experience which led me to research this heavily.

    I believe the added vitamins with emulsifiers are used in milk just as a marketing angle that has become customary. "1%" milk does NOT require added vitamins. If it says "Low-fat," then I believe it DOES require added vitamins.

    Therefore, other products made from dairy will most likely not contain added chemical emulsifiers because it is not the marketing angle to promote it as such. I don't eat string cheese, but I do frequently consume the following non-fat milk powder, and unless I'm horribly mistaken, there are no added ingredients at all, so no emulsifiers, etc:
    http://www.bobsredmill.com/non-fat-dry-milk_powder.html

    Some milk powders do have added vitamin A+D, so they may have emulsifiers as well.
     
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