1. Cocoa Butter - Organic & Fair Trade Certified
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. **NEW** BL11 - Orange, Red & Infrared Therapy Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Charcoal Soap - For Deep Cleansing
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Orange & Red Light Therapy Device - LGS1
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  5. Organic Cocoa Powder
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  6. Metabasoap - Handcrafted Soap
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  7. Cascara Sagrada Powder From Farmalabor In Italy
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  8. **NEW Mini Body Light** MBL1 - Orange & Red Light Therapy Mini Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice

Diet Completely Free Of Salt? Possible To Survive / Thrive?

Discussion in 'Ask For Help or Advice' started by JanP, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2013
    Messages:
    2,199
    Salt licks are necessary only when the ratio of NaCl/Potassium in the food is disturbed ( NPK fertilizers). You can read the books of Andre Voisin about the problems of modern fertilizers which bring too much potassium.


    Look at the work of Mexican cardilogist Sodi-Pallares: he banished salt for his patients in cardiac failure.

    I suspect Ray's comments apply to the situations were people were using diuretics to lower their NaCl body pool, and were overdoing it without realizing.

    The problem with Ray is he often likes to talk in extremes and leaves his readers without perspective for the usual middle of the road.

    For example, I've read here members advising cancer patients to salt their diet, which is crazy.

    Salt is kind of a can of worms subject: maybe someone should start a dedicated thread.
     
  2. methylenewhite

    methylenewhite Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2018
    Messages:
    199
    Gender:
    Male
    Especially goats evolved without need of NaCl. They climb that high to lick the salt only to mislead stupid human researchers. I guess they get paid by salt manufacturers


    So do monkeys. I mean just to get paid. On all this videos across the web.


    Fertilizers you say? Free-range sheep far away from civilization. Nepal.


    Animals eat salt at will as soon as available.


    Elephants.


    Wild boar invades farm to eat salt
    siga 2 - March 8 - 2011 - wild Boar eats from pillar of salt
     
  3. tankasnowgod

    tankasnowgod Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2014
    Messages:
    1,978
    Gender:
    Male
    Also, what about the amount of salt that humans have gotten in aside from diet? A significant amount of salt could be absorbed transdermally if a person spent a significant time in the ocean or other saltwater. A fair amount of salt could be inhaled, as well.
     
  4. ken

    ken Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2012
    Messages:
    185
  5. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2013
    Messages:
    2,199
    Except you forgot to add these SALT LICKS are also called MINERAL LICKS.

    "A mineral lick (also known as a salt lick) is a place where animals can go to lick essential mineral nutrients from a deposit of salts and other minerals. Mineral licks can be naturally occurring or artificial (such as blocks of salt that farmers place in pastures for livestock to lick). Natural licks are common, and they provide essential elements such as phosphorus and the biometals (sodium, calcium, iron, zinc, and trace elements) required in the springtime for bone, muscle and other growth in deer and other wildlife, such as moose, elephants, tapirs, cattle, woodchucks, domestic sheep, fox squirrels, mountain goats and porcupines. Such licks are especially important in ecosystems with poor general availability of nutrients. Harsh weather exposes salty mineral deposits that draw animals from miles away for a taste of needed nutrients. It is thought that certain fauna can detect calcium in salt licks.[1]"

    And i repeat, an excess of potassium in plants from NPK fertilizers induces loss of sodium in animals through urine.
    It's a perfectly natural kidney mechanism where potassium induces natriuresis.

    And that's precisely the mechanism used by the Gerson people (vegetable juices) to rid the body of it's excess sodium always prevalent in cancer.
     
  6. paymanz

    paymanz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    Messages:
    2,582
    Gender:
    Male
    at least through aldosterone mechanism it induces exactly the opposite.
     
  7. paymanz

    paymanz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    Messages:
    2,582
    Gender:
    Male
    what is salt restriction purpose exactly? hormonal effect? blood level of sodium,interstitial level?! i havent searched it but to what degree can you manipulate sodium levels?maybe diet has big impact on interstitial fluid sodium level , but in blood , stress hormones compensate the lower intake to keep levels normal.

    and chloride also itself is another nutrient that we need.
     
  8. OP
    JanP

    JanP Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2017
    Messages:
    59
    Gender:
    Male
    I love how both "salt is necessary" and "salt is not necessary" opinions in this thread is backed with very logical arguments. This thread is full of awesome posts, please keep them coming! :):
     
  9. tara

    tara Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Messages:
    9,670
    Gender:
    Female
    Non-expert comments ...

    My understanding is that some people do well with little or no extra NaCl added to their food, as long as they transition gradually, and as long as their diet is other-wise fairly mineral-rich and diverse. On the other hand, I also know that some people seem to do better adding salt to their food (there are reports here in the forum, and I have to watch it myself), and some people can get dangerously ill with hyponatremia if they neglect daily NaCl. Some metabolic conditions can make it harder to retain sufficient sodium. Esp. in the face of too much water/sweating/nutrient-poor food. (I've seen serious loss of function, and I've seen it recover after careful restoration via slow saline drip in hospital.)

    I too am curious about what you mean by this?
    Are you sensitive to:
    - salt granules, sprinkled on food?
    - salt incorporated during cooking and well diluted into foods such as soups or stews?
    - any dilution, including very mild?
    - all commercially prepared foods that include dissolved NaCl?
    - naturally occurring NaCl in foods, eg seafood?
    - iodised/non-iodised, with or without free-flow agents, etc?

    Also wonder whether you happen to have any lab tests showing whether you are generally in the lower, higher or middle of the range for blood sodium? Not meaning you should necessarily run out to get some, but if you had any in the last while, or are getting tests for other reasons, this one might get done routinely, and could give reassurance or caution.

    If I were in your shoes, and noticed no contra-indications, I'd consider:
    - eating plenty of fruit and veges and broths that include the range of alkaline minerals
    - keeping an eye on general metabolism
    - keeping an eye out for symptoms
    - cautiously try a little of well diluted salt in cooked food from time to time and watch what happens.

    Even if a number of factors can contribute to hyponatremia, including various metabolic imbalances/dysfunctions, drinking too much plain water, mineral deficient diet, etc, and even if some people have maintained very good health without supplementing any NaCl, it's still true that eating insufficient sodium to replace losses can definitely be dangerous in some circumstances for some people. It might be wise to keep an eye on indicators from time to time.
     
  10. OP
    JanP

    JanP Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2017
    Messages:
    59
    Gender:
    Male
    Hi Tara and many thanks for your post!

    Have tried "keltic" natural salt without any additives, basic refined "supermarket" salt, iodised salt, salt without iodine, they all are causing symptoms. I'm not eating foods with lots of naturally occurring NaCl, so I can't comment on that, but things like disodium phosphate or sodium ascorbate as food additives does cause symptoms.

    I can handle salt granules sprinkled on food better, than diluted salt, but not by a huge margin.

    When the salt is diluted, it doesn't matter in how much liquid it is diluted, but the total amount of NaCl does matter.

    Yes, I do! :):

    2015:
    Na: 142
    K: 4,1
    Cl: 102

    2017:
    Na: 142
    K: 4
    Cl: 96

    2018:
    Na: 141
    K: 3,89
    Cl: 103

    Reference range for Na is 136-145 mmol/l in my lab. I was eating quite a lot of sodium in 2018, but almost no sodium in 2015. Also, I was eating significantly more potassium in 2018 than in previous years. Strange.

    Great tips, much appreciated!! You are absolutely right, since I have started to actively keep the intake of other mineals in optimal range, my health improved a lot. Especially magnesium and calcium makes me feel much better overall.
     
  11. tara

    tara Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Messages:
    9,670
    Gender:
    Female
    Looking at those numbers as a non-expert, it doesn't look as though you were anywhere near hyponatraemic at any of those test points, so if they were representative, I too would be wondering whether you need much or any extra sodium from NaCl as some people seem to.
    But if you cut it down to zero added NaCl, this might be one to keep an occasional eye on if you ever get tests, or get related symptoms.
     
  12. lampofred

    lampofred Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2016
    Messages:
    1,035
    Gender:
    Male
    It would probably depend on how good your thyroid/glucose oxidation is. If you are producing ample CO2, your body can easily retain enough sodium from the foods you eat that naturally contain it so that you don't need any extra sodium chloride, but if you have high estrogen, you'll dump salt and might experience several health troubles related to sodium deficiency like insomnia, excess serotonin secretion, seizures, etc if you don't have additional table/sea salt in your diet.
     
  13. TeaRex14

    TeaRex14 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2018
    Messages:
    575
    Gender:
    Male
    Salt has played a pretty important part in our history. We found it was necessary to open trade ports around the world for salt. The fact people went to such great lengths to acquire salt in a time period when travel was low, slow, and dangerous says a lot. Peat recommends "salt to taste". If you have hypothyroidism and aldosterone issues supplementing pregnenolone, progesterone, or thyroid can increase your sodium retention. As a holdover, you can just increase your salt intake if you don't have pregnenolone, progesterone, or thyroid. But correcting thyroid is the best plan for long term success.
     
  14. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2013
    Messages:
    7,279
    Gender:
    Female
    True, so important that we get our English word salary from salt.
    FACT: the word ‘salary’ comes from the history of salt
     
  15. TeaRex14

    TeaRex14 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2018
    Messages:
    575
    Gender:
    Male
  16. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2013
    Messages:
    7,279
    Gender:
    Female
    :joyful:
    Morton's canning salt boss.
     
  17. Constatine

    Constatine Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2016
    Messages:
    1,623
    Gender:
    Male
    Not being able to tolerate salt could be a sign of gut dysbiosis. Salt slightly wears at the gut mucosa and can cause bacteria to translocate if the gut health is poor.
     
  18. Rafael Lao Wai

    Rafael Lao Wai Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2017
    Messages:
    320
    Gender:
    Male
    I notice that caffeine( but not coffee) is beneficial for gut inflammations.
     
  19. EIRE24

    EIRE24 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2015
    Messages:
    1,655
    What would protect gut mucosa?
     
  20. TeaRex14

    TeaRex14 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2018
    Messages:
    575
    Gender:
    Male
    Lol, I'm afraid to ask my boss for more salt. Some salt is always better then no salt.
     
Loading...