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Deficiency on Peat's Diet?

Kris

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Joined
Oct 15, 2012
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400
I was wondering if anyone had similar problems. After eating Peat's style diet for a while I did some blood tests and they showed strong iron deficiency, high both LDL and triglycerides. I wonder if eating too much sugar can contribute to high triglycerides?
 

kettlebell

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Oct 14, 2012
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High LDL and triglycerides isn't necessarily an issue in itself - They have been accused of being guilty by association to various diseases, that doesn't mean they are the cause. High cholesterol is potentially indicative of your body not converting it to the hormones it requires (Pregnenolone, progesterone, DHEA, testosterone etc). Getting enough vitamin A is important for this conversion and having enough circulating T3 is also required. If both of those are optimal your cholesterol will soon be in a "Normal" range thanks to its conversion to protective hormones. You might want to consider tweaking your eating to go in the right direction.

Using Niacinamide can help dramatically reduce free fatty acids in the blood allowing the glucose to get into cells for oxidative metabolism to occur.

Eating a lot of sugar should not itself contribute to higher triglycerides unless a lot of that sugar is being converted into fat before the cells can use it for energy.

What was your iron reading? Is it just low or are you showing symptoms (Increased tiredness etc)? The problem with lab tests is most labs have different standards and charts of what is normal.

Also, and importantly, most "healthy" ranges of hormones/vits/minerals have been determined without testing genuinely healthy people. The people who are tested and used in studies are almost always sick/symptomatic of something.

If your Iron is genuinely too low, eating a bit of red meat without worrying about using coca cola or other caffeine for a short time to reduce iron absorption would probably help bring levels back up again.

Hope this is useful.
 

cliff

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Jul 26, 2012
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How long have you even been eating peat style diet?
 
J

j.

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A lot of sugar before the thyroid is working well probably will increase cholesterol.
 

Ingenol

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Nov 25, 2012
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j. said:
A lot of sugar before the thyroid is working well probably will increase cholesterol.
This makes sense, but should someone worry about this or treat it as a step along the "Peat Path" to optimized metabolism and thyroid function? In other words: is plenty of sugar part of the solution to poor thyroid function?
 
J

j.

Guest
Ingenol said:
This makes sense, but should someone worry about this or treat it as a step along the "Peat Path" to optimized metabolism and thyroid function? In other words: is plenty of sugar part of the solution to poor thyroid function?

I think if you're eating too much sugar your body somehow will tell you to stop. One thing you could do is ingest more sugar from fruits and less table sugar. When I was starting this approach, I was able to consume more sugar that way.
 

Kris

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Oct 15, 2012
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400
Thank you for your response! I have been eating Peat's style only a short time, 3 months, give or take. I don't know my iron reading from before that, but my cholesterol was better. I do not eat table sugar much. Mostly fruits, honey and maple syrup.

My iron tests:
Iron: 10 (65 is normal)
TIBC: 137
Transferrin Saturation: 7
Ferritin: 43
Triglycerides: 212
LDL: 194

Can eating full fat milk (cheese) contribute to high LDL?
 

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