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Darkness & Light & Madness

Rinse & rePeat

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"Curt Richter already in 1957 had described the "hopelessness" phenomenon in rats (“a reaction of hopelessness is shown by some wild rats very soon after being grasped in the hand and prevented from moving. They seem literally to give up,”) and even how to cure their hopelessness, by allowing them to have an experience of escaping once (Richter, 1957, 1958). Rats which would normally be able to keep swimming in a tank for two or three days, would often give up and drown in just a few minutes, after having an experience of "inescapable stress." Richter made the important discovery that the hearts of the hopeless rats slowed down before they died, remaining relaxed and filled with blood, revealing the dominant activity of the vagal nerve, secreting acetylcholine." -Ray Peat
 

Jennifer

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A surprise of ones self, a welcome one i might add.

For sure!

Thanks Jon! Yes go to the light! 😝 it is gonna be a tough winter. I have heard RP talk about having incandescent light on the skin as much as possible during the day when indoors, is that to make vitamin D?

Rinse, do you happen to know if Ray has ever talked about someone requiring less sun or at least, preferring indirect sunlight and/or the shade, as their health improves?
 

Rinse & rePeat

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For sure!



Rinse, do you happen to know if Ray has ever talked about someone requiring less sun or at least, preferring indirect sunlight and/or the shade, as their health improves?

Not shade, but in the interview below he said morning sun for 20 minutes as to not burn. He said the peak hours of 10:00 to 2:00 and after is too stressful and can be as damaging as an x-ray. He also said not throught glass either, like a window.


View: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YS-dg3Dc78k
 

Jennifer

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Not shade, but in the interview below he said morning sun for 20 minutes as to not burn. He said the peak hours of 10:00 to 2:00 and after is too stressful and can be as damaging as an x-ray. He also said not throught glass either, like a window.


View: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YS-dg3Dc78k


That helps. Thank you. I’ll keep going through his interviews to see if there’s a connection between health and sun requirements. I’m curious because the healthier I got, the less sun I desired to the point that I now prefer the shade, just like I did when I was a little girl. As recently as last summer, I couldn’t get enough sun and needed at least an hour of it daily to feel functional and keep my vitamin D level up, but I hardly got any sun this summer and not only did my vitamin D level stay up, this was the first time in years that I didn’t suffer from depression and my mum shares the same experience. She has also been following Peaty recommendations and working on her emotional health so I wondered if there was a connection.
 

Rinse & rePeat

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That helps. Thank you. I’ll keep going through his interviews to see if there’s a connection between health and sun requirements. I’m curious because the healthier I got, the less sun I desired to the point that I now prefer the shade, just like I did when I was a little girl. As recently as last summer, I couldn’t get enough sun and needed at least an hour of it daily to feel functional and keep my vitamin D level up, but I hardly got any sun this summer and not only did my vitamin D level stay up, this was the first time in years that I didn’t suffer from depression and my mum shares the same experience. She has also been following Peaty recommendations and working on her emotional health so I wondered if there was a connection.

Hmmm.... I will have to see what that is all about. I will let you know what else I find. It is a really subject.
 

Rinse & rePeat

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Aha! Here is your answer Jennifer! Listen to RP at the 9:00 minute mark! If you get a lot of calcium you don't need to much D. This while interview with RP is on vitamin D. I haven't listened to the while thing yet csusecit is an hour and 45 minutes. I am excited!

 

Jennifer

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Hmmm.... I will have to see what that is all about. I will let you know what else I find. It is a really subject.

Wow, that was fast! Thank you! I’ll listen to it before bed. I’ve been pondering for some time now if location, diet and ancestry (skin color) factor in somehow, meaning, the further from the equator we are, the more important animal foods become for acquiring cholesterol and vitamin D, and the lighter the skin, the less time in the sun is needed. This was the first summer in years that I wasn’t following a vegan and fruitarian diet, and have been focusing on getting nutrient dense animal foods. Add to that my ancestry—I have very fair skin—so I thought maybe I require less sun exposure than someone with a darker complexion. Anyhow, thanks again. :)
 

Rinse & rePeat

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Wow, that was fast! Thank you! I’ll listen to it before bed. I’ve been pondering for some time now if location, diet and ancestry (skin color) factor in somehow, meaning, the further from the equator we are, the more important animal foods become for acquiring cholesterol and vitamin D, and the lighter the skin, the less time in the sun is needed. This was the first summer in years that I wasn’t following a vegan and fruitarian diet, and have been focusing on getting nutrient dense animal foods. Add to that my ancestry—I have very fair skin—so I thought maybe I require less sun exposure than someone with a darker complexion. Anyhow, thanks again. :)

I know you live on a lot of milk and honey, so listening in at that "how much" mark was a light bulb moment! I love how we all learn from each other just asking questions. I would never have found that interview had you not asked. I am gonna be a little smarter tomorrow!
 
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Grounding and sun gazing early or late in the day do things to me that I can't put into words. Perfection.
 
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Rinse & rePeat

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Grounding and sun gazing early or late in the day does things to me that I can't put into words. Perfection.

I don't know anyrhing about grounding, but laying in my lounge chair looking up does what I think you are talking about. I am always looking for things in the clouds! It is how I love to start my day or end it!
 

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I don't know anyrhing about grounding, but laying in my lounge chair looking up does what I think you are talking about. I am always looking for things in the clouds! It is how I love to start my

I don't know anyrhing about grounding, but laying in my lounge chair looking up does what I think you are talking about. I am always looking for things in the clouds! It is how I love to start my day or end it!
Amen to that!
 

Jennifer

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I’ve been pondering for some time now if location, diet and ancestry (skin color) factor in somehow, meaning, the further from the equator we are, the more important animal foods become for acquiring cholesterol and vitamin D, and the lighter the skin, the less time in the sun is needed. This was the first summer in years that I wasn’t following a vegan and fruitarian diet, and have been focusing on getting nutrient dense animal foods.

This appears to be the case. Starting around 12:25, Ray says this in regards to vitamin D:

“If you think of people who were in the sunlight constantly producing their own conversion of cholesterol to cholecalciferol, they didn’t need any from the environment, but when you moved to the north, the only way to survive more than a season or so is to start eating some organism that still is in the sun, and still producing cholecalciferol so you either have to live on the coast and eat fish or eat animals which have been in the sunlight. When you’re near the equator and have round the year sunlight exposure then you can be a vegetarian theoretically without the risk of a vitamin D deficiency.”

He goes on to say that our livers hydroxylate the cholecalciferol from dairy and fish into vitamin D so I’d imagine the quality protein is also beneficial, and it makes sense to me why seafood and dairy have been a substantial part of our diet here in this northern coastal region. Once I reintroduced shellfish and dairy, my vitamin D level stabilized. It’s nice no longer having to sacrifice the health of my skin to keep my vitamin D level from tanking and prevent depression.

I have heard RP talk about having incandescent light on the skin as much as possible during the day when indoors, is that to make vitamin D?

Ray mentioned incandescent light activating the conversion of cholesterol to cholecalciferol, a “protective, defensive process.”
 

Rinse & rePeat

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This appears to be the case. Starting around 12:25, Ray says this in regards to vitamin D:

“If you think of people who were in the sunlight constantly producing their own conversion of cholesterol to cholecalciferol, they didn’t need any from the environment, but when you moved to the north, the only way to survive more than a season or so is to start eating some organism that still is in the sun, and still producing cholecalciferol so you either have to live on the coast and eat fish or eat animals which have been in the sunlight. When you’re near the equator and have round the year sunlight exposure then you can be a vegetarian theoretically without the risk of a vitamin D deficiency.”

He goes on to say that our livers hydroxylate the cholecalciferol from dairy and fish into vitamin D so I’d imagine the quality protein is also beneficial, and it makes sense to me why seafood and dairy have been a substantial part of our diet here in this northern coastal region. Once I reintroduced shellfish and dairy, my vitamin D level stabilized. It’s nice no longer having to sacrifice the health of my skin to keep my vitamin D level from tanking and prevent depression.



Ray mentioned incandescent light activating the conversion of cholesterol to cholecalciferol, a “protective, defensive process.”

This interview is quite the jewel, answering so many sun of your and my questions! I didn't know about building up slowly vitamin D via sun and I didn't know that raw whole milk and beef liver has a good amounts of vitamin D too!
 

Jennifer

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This interview is quite the jewel, answering so many sun of your and my questions! I didn't know about building up slowly vitamin D via sun and I didn't know that raw whole milk and beef liver has a good amounts of vitamin D too!

It sure is! I’ve yet to listen to one of Ray’s that isn’t. I was heavy into the Weston A. Price Foundation when I first fractured so I knew whole milk and liver were good sources of vitamin D (and other fat soluble vitamins)—I credit them to increasing my bone density by 50%—but wasn’t sure why I struggled to keep my level up so thank you again for posting this interview. :)
 

Rinse & rePeat

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It sure is! I’ve yet to listen to one of Ray’s that isn’t. I was heavy into the Weston A. Price Foundation when I first fractured so I knew whole milk and liver were good sources of vitamin D (and other fat soluble vitamins)—I credit them to increasing my bone density by 50%—but wasn’t sure why I struggled to keep my level up so thank you again for posting this interview. :)

Vitamin D is such a complex subject and issue, but we are getting to know it better!
 

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Rinse & rePeat

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"The psychopathology of social isolation has been studied in a variety of animals, and many features are similar across species, including humans. Aggression, helplessness, and reduced ability to learn are typically produced in animals by social isolation, and it's clear that certain kinds of family environment produce the same conditions in children. Schools seldom help, and often hinder, recovery from such early experiences." -Ray Peat
 

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"One of the old cultural stereotypes is that child prodigies always “burn out,” as if they were consuming a fixed amount of mental energy at an accelerated rate. (This idea of burn-out is isomorphic with the other cultural stereotypes relating aging to the “rate of living,” for example that people with slow heart beats will live longer.) Some of the men who have been considered as the world's brightest have, in fact, gone through a crisis of depression, and Terman's long-term study of bright people found that “maladjustment” did increase with I.Q., especially among women. But the facts don't support the concept of “burn-out” at all. I think the facts reveal instead a deep flaw in our ideas of education and professional knowledge" -Ray Peat
 

soul_rebel

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This appears to be the case. Starting around 12:25, Ray says this in regards to vitamin D:

“If you think of people who were in the sunlight constantly producing their own conversion of cholesterol to cholecalciferol, they didn’t need any from the environment, but when you moved to the north, the only way to survive more than a season or so is to start eating some organism that still is in the sun, and still producing cholecalciferol so you either have to live on the coast and eat fish or eat animals which have been in the sunlight. When you’re near the equator and have round the year sunlight exposure then you can be a vegetarian theoretically without the risk of a vitamin D deficiency.”

He goes on to say that our livers hydroxylate the cholecalciferol from dairy and fish into vitamin D so I’d imagine the quality protein is also beneficial, and it makes sense to me why seafood and dairy have been a substantial part of our diet here in this northern coastal region. Once I reintroduced shellfish and dairy, my vitamin D level stabilized. It’s nice no longer having to sacrifice the health of my skin to keep my vitamin D level from tanking and prevent depression.



Ray mentioned incandescent light activating the conversion of cholesterol to cholecalciferol, a “protective, defensive process.”
This is great information. Thanks
 

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