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Cyproheptadine-induced Remission Of Cushings

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by Blinkyrocket, Aug 1, 2015.

  1. Blinkyrocket

    Blinkyrocket Member

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  2. sugarbabe

    sugarbabe Member

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    I think he said his cushings is from a tumor, but good find!
     
  3. OP
    Blinkyrocket

    Blinkyrocket Member

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    Ah! Well then... -_-

    That stinks.
     
  4. messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

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    There's also pseudocushings, which can be caused by all kinds of things; sometimes no reason any doctor can find.

    I'll attest to its effectiveness with this myself.
     
  5. haidut

    haidut Member

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    All anti-serotonin drugs likely lower cortisol. This study and some others also on Cushing are posted in the "Cyproheptadine - a wonder drug" thread. Other drugs with similar effects include mianserin / mirtazapine, bromocriptine, lisuride, cabergoline, etc. The anti-adrenalin drug clonidine also lowers cortisol. These drugs tend to work mostly when the source of cortisol is central - i.e. pituitary. If it's from non-pituitary adenoma or other sources then I am not sure how effective they are.
     
  6. schultz

    schultz Member

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    This is interesting as I was just reading about equine Cushing's syndrome aka Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID). One of the treatments for PPID is cyproheptadine. I believe the equine Cushing's syndrome is a bit different but still this is interesting to me. PPID is also connected to diabetes in horses.

    I do a lot of animal research, mainly on ruminant animals and chickens, and it's interesting to start picking out similarities to what Ray talks about with human nutrition. Except in animal research they are much more direct it seems.

    For example, in chicks there is a disease called "crazy chick disease" which is caused by a vitamin E deficiency. Really it's cause by PUFA but the vitamin E just happens to cure it. Here is a quote from this site...

    "The vitamin E deficiency is usually manifested in young birds -chickens, turkey poults, ducklings, pheasant poults etc. Most outbreaks are related to high levels of polyunsaturated fat in the diet (meat and bone meal, fish meal etc.) or rancid fat content."

    Chickens have higher body temperatures so I'm sure PUFA's oxidize even quicker in their body.

    Ray has mentioned yellow fat disease in mink. It also occurs in cats

    "Ingestion of large amounts of unsaturated fats without sufficient antioxidant activity may result in peroxidation (where free radicals "steal" electrons from the lipids in cell membranes, resulting in cell damage) with subsequent fat necrosis (death of fat cells) and steatitis. Cats that are fed large amounts of tuna, particularly red tuna, tend to be more prone to steatitis."

    And recently there was a ScienceDaily article about dolphins getting diabetes, and when they eat saturated fat it goes away...

    "We were surprised to find that among the 55 fatty acids studied, the saturated fat heptadecanoic acid appeared to have had the most beneficial impact on dolphin metabolism,"

    This fat, heptadecanoic acid, or C17:0, is also found in dairy...

    "The highest levels were found in whole fat milk, yogurt, and especially butter."

    Anyway, I didn't mean to change the topic, just got excited is all :oops:
     
  7. haidut

    haidut Member

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    Can stress cause Cushings in horses? I have heard that race horses are especially vulnerable to this condition and I would imagine that they lead a pretty stressful life through training and exhausting races.
    Speaking of PUFA - I think PUFA activate 11β-HSD1, which increases levels of cortisol. Can that also contribute to the "crazy" chick disease given the role of cortisol in mental pathologies?
     
  8. greengr

    greengr Member

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    What kind of effect would this have on someone with opposite disorder? Let's say someone has Addison's disease (low to non-existent cortisol output) would this be detrimental to them?
     
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