curds and whey

Discussion in 'Meet & Greet' started by CountryDame, Apr 5, 2013.

  1. CountryDame

    CountryDame New Member

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    I found Dr. Peat when I became curious about Dr John Lee's mentor, whom he described as "some kind of genius."

    I have my own goat milk, and have stopped making yogurt. Now I am using Fromase a microbial coagulant that separates the milk into curds and whey. When I drain the whey I am disposing of the tryptophan and the lactose. I'm not able to digest much lactose without gastric trouble. I tested the pH of the freshly drawn millk and the curds after draining: both readings were 6.2 pH. So I don't think there is Lactic acid being produced, but how can I tell for sure?

    I have lipomas: fatty deposits under the skin in various places and it seems to me that lipase and lipolysis should be helpful??
     
  2. Birdie

    Birdie Member

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    That's a great way to come into studying Peat!!

    I can tell you that for regular cottage cheese that you buy in the market, Ray advises rinsing it to remove the lactic acid. I keep rinsing until the water runs almost clear. It takes a while. I don't really know the answer to your questions but maybe that helps. It does sound like you should email Peat! Good questions for him.
     
  3. Jenn

    Jenn Member

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    If you are making a quick (fresh) cheese, there isn't going to be much lactic acid yet. lactic acid build up as it ages.
     
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