Cottage/Farmers Cheese Ca/P Ratio

Discussion in 'Cheese' started by j., Apr 17, 2014.

  1. j.

    j. Guest

    According to wikipedia, cottage cheese has about 2 units of phosphorus per unit of calcium.
     
  2. OP
    j.

    j. Guest

    That might be the reason I feel better when I drink milk. At first I thought how could this make sense if the protein is supposed to be better?
     
  3. Mittir

    Mittir Member

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    I just want to warm people about the possible difference between
    farmer's cheese and cottage cheese.
    I have posted before that farmer's cheese does not have much calcium.
    My PTH was quite high when i was using farmer's cheese as main
    calcium source, thinking i am getting a good amount of calcium.
    I knew there were some calcium loss in processing but i used
    cottage cheese nutrition profile as a guide.
    I have read a study that showed the calcium content of Whey from acid
    treated curd ( farmer's cheese) was almost double the amount found in
    whey from cottage cheese. Calcium loss largely depends on the acidity.
    I believe acidity is much higher in farmer's cheese making process.
    I try to use as little acid as possible to make farmer's cheese.
    They did not measure phosphorus loss. I use farmer's cheese mainly for protein.
     
  4. OP
    j.

    j. Guest

    So if farmers cheese is my main source of protein, I guess I'll have to supplement calcium carbonate.

    Anyone has thoughts on the idea of taking a 1250 mg pill daily, divided in three doses throughout the day?
     
  5. pboy

    pboy Member

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    yea I haven't figured out exactly why, but cottage cheese, paneer, ricotta, greek yogurt all have as much or more phosphorus than calcium. I suppose it depends on how much they are strained, and to what extent the acid builds up before straining (more acid probably pulls out more calcium). But yea, according to the nutrition labels on various brands and data ive found online, nutrition data also, all basically show the calcium loss in these foods but the phosphorus generally doesn't change a lot. So Milk, non strained yogurt (but that has its own issues), and cheese are the best dairy products as the main protein source...long term. If you were to get a smaller % of protein from the cottage, farmers, greek yogurt type it would probably still be balanced overall as long as the main portion of the dairy was from milk, yogurt, or cheese...and if other high calcium / phosphorus foods were part of the diet. Spring water (with minerals, doesn't have to be carbonated) usually has 2-4% calcium per cup and little to no phosphorus, even some magnesium in there...so its a good choice to cook with or brew coffee or teas with, or drink to help maintain balance
     
  6. OP
    j.

    j. Guest

    I thought ricotta was going to be better in Ca/P ratio because it's made from the whey, which is higher in calcium than the curds.
     
  7. OP
    j.

    j. Guest

    do they exist?
     
  8. pboy

    pboy Member

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    hmm I guess true ricotta would be good, the stuff labeled ricotta at grocery stores is often more like a watery paneer than recooked whey (true ricotta)...they use vinegar to curdle the milk then slightly strain off the whey...basically like non fermented greek yogurt with full fat. Recooked strained whey would probably have a positive ratio.

    lol yea its few and far between, but most leafy vegetables spices and tea, things coming from a flower or bark, generally have a slightly to moderately positive calcium to phosphorus ratio. I guess the problem is that most of these parts of plants have some level of toxins or irritants, which is why they are not great to consume all the time. Ive messed around with probably a hundred or more herbs and id say most of them are in fact gut irritants...which is why they are generally medicinal and only used on occasion. Fruit is generally (not always berries) neutral or slightly positive. Most unprocessed natural water has a positive ratio. But yea unfortunately we are probably designed to eat like an ape which would naturally produce the positive ratio, but we are starved for year round ripe fruit and non offensive vegetable matter for the most part in our society...so milk comes in. Its basically like purified liquid grass when you think about it. It seems restricitive and I don't necessarily like it, but it apparently is what it is and its more worth it to me to use higher amounts of a select few foods and not have any nagging sensations or side effects rather than introduce things for the sake of variety or to pacify a social situation, but feel the consequences for a while after. My definition of 'feel the consequences' is probably something many people here in the US would not be able to detect, or they are completely desensitized to, because they have been basically in a state less than optimal most or all of their lives


    then you also have things like pickling lime (calcium hydroxide), which is added during the processing of sugar and many corn based foods, so molasses and corn based foods often have a largely inflated calcium content. I don't know if its actually absorbable and usable, but if it is, it might be an option. The same would apply to egg shell or oyster shell or some other form or inorganic substance containing a lot of calcium...whatever they put in supplements, chalk even. Its questionable how much the body actually used or absorbs...cant say I have any intimate experience to talk about with those substances. Bone broth in theory seems like it could be valuable, but its also something ive never tried
     
  9. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    I have 1/4 tsp eggshell calcium with farmers cheese and cottage cheese and 1/8 tsp eggshell calcium with Greek yogurt. It seems to always work out ok for the overall calcium/phosphate ratio according to the cronometer. The cronometer doesn't have farmers cheese listed so I always plug it in as cottage cheese. It's not exact but the closest estimate I can get. I pick the calcium carbonate listed under supplements and put in .125 serving size of the calcium carbonate supplement for 1/8 tsp eggshell calcium and .25 serving size for 1/4 tsp eggshell calcium. That's about as close as I can estimate it. If anyone tries this and notices a better way please let me know!
     
  10. John Frusciante

    John Frusciante Member

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    I once asked Dr. Peat this, and he said it apparently depends on how the milk is coagulated.
     
  11. tara

    tara Member

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    When I was making cheese cake with homemade farmers cheese, I mixed in calcium carbonate (oyster shell) to help with this balance.
     
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