Cottage Cheese & Fresh Flax Seed Oil Cures Cancer

bionicheart

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I know a lot of you have already heard of the Budwig Protocol, but I didn't know about this recipe. I thought anyone dealing with cancer/tumors might want to read this. I just found it interesting and am considering it since I have been told I have a uterine fibroid.
I don't understand the mechanism of phytoestrogens as well as others, but I wanted to put this article out there for anyone interested in trying it or debunking it....
https://www.mykidcurescancer.com/budwig-diet/

Thanks for reading,
Best Regards
 

HDD

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Ray Peat’s thoughts on Budwig Protocol-

RP: One of the oldest treatments for cancer was enemas. Thousands of years ago, doctors were recommending regular enemas to treat cancer and a few hundred years ago laxatives became a standard feature of cancer treatment. Just about 60 or 70 years ago Max Gerson cured his own migraines with a change of diet. In the 20th century, he was the most famous advocate of a mostly vegetable diet, but he did use liver - liver juice was one of his components - and typically a good dose of thyroid was part of his program. And so it was a nutritionally rational program, but he twice in his book in capital letters said 'absolutely no oils'. His followers have changed the book and I think they were influenced by Johanna Budwig and her flax oil and cottage cheese diet. In 1954, before Budwig had started writing about cancer, a Mexican professor had an article in Prevention magazine advocating - I think it was - a cup of linseed oil a day as a purge, in the tradition of getting the intestine as clean as possible. And when you drink that much of a highly unsaturated oil, the unsaturated fatty acids are converted to prostaglandins and cause intense contraction and secretion of the intestine. So it's a very quick {through? thrill?} kind of laxative. That was changed in Budwig's writing several years later to think of the linseed oil as a nutritional factor rather than as a laxative. And to the extent that it works as a laxative, it's very likely helpful. But the rest of her program was curds - cottage cheese, basically - and that's a very soothing, safe diet that happens to be less able to promote endotoxin than other proteins. I think there are reasons that the vegetables, when you juice them, you get lots of minerals that allow you to assimilate the sugars that are present in leafy and other vegetables. So the Gerson diet and the Ludwig diet had some very rational factors. Basically, keeping the intestine clean and keeping the thyroid function up I think are the most important.

Endotoxin - Kmud, November 19 2010
 

Travis

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Dairy does have steroid hormones, and flaxseed oil does have linoleic acid. Flaxseed oil is actually synonymous with linseed oil, which—despite its name—has only about 20% of the eponymous linoleic acid (some oils actually have far more). As Ray Peat had alluded to, these are the only precursor to the prostaglandins.* These are lipid hormones, and prostaglandin E₂ has been shown to stimulate cancer cells directly in dozens of studies. It ostensibly does so by transcribing for ornithine decarboxylase, the main enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. Polyamines are so intertwined with cancer as to have become nearly synonymous with it; these small molecules bind with dNA directly, induce the Z‐dNA configuration, and enhance the rate of replication. Inhibitors of this enzyme are powerful anticancer drugs, selenomethionine being similar. Although Se‐methionine can't be said to be a classic inhibitor, it displaces regular sulfur‐methionine leading to low amounts of polyamines. This is a convincing anticancer drug, and it's actually just an amino acid.

Another amino acid which would act to inhibit cancer is L‐threonine; excessive amounts of this amino acid become methylgloxal, which is a classic tumor‐inhibitor. There's been a few molecular modes of action proposed for this including, but not limit to: occupying glutathione (Thornalley), displacing NADH from glycolytic enzymes (Me), and even acting on transcription factor mSin3A directly (Thornalley). However, the classic ideas of medical doctor and chemist William Koch are probably most relevant: methylglyoxal can disable polyamines directly through forming a Schiff base.

The enzyme glyoxylase I converts methylglyoxal into lactic acid, a known species found in tumors (Warburg, 1956). The activity of this enzyme is commonly found reduced in tumors, meaning less methylgloxal, and the activity of ornithine decarboxylase is very often found increased (more polyamines). Inhibiting glyoxylase I lowers the lactate concentration and increases methylgloxal levels. The most powerful natural inhibitors of glyoxylase I are baicalein, lapachol, and β-lapachone—the latter two found in Pau d'Arco. The polyphenol baicalein also inhibits lipoxygenase, perhaps another reason for its anti‐cancer effects. The enzyme lipoxygenase also produces lipid hormones, cousins of prostaglandins called leukotrienes.

Of all of the alternative cancer diets, the Budwig one seems to be the worst. It is truly bizarre and sounds dangerous to me.

[*] Exception being the 3‐series prostaglandins made from eicosapentaenoic acid; but these do have much lower biological activity.
 
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Obi-wan

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Glad to see Travis comment on this post. I will tell you personally that Flax seed oil is pure poison and will make your cancer worse. I was trying to treat my prostate cancer with the Budwig diet along with taking fish oils and it metastasized!!! I think Ray mentioned that Johanna had mental issues. DO NOT DO THIS DIET!
 
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Obi-wan

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"The most powerful natural inhibitors of glyoxylase I are baicalein, lapachol, and β-lapachone—the latter two found in Pau d'Arco " I now take Lapodin on a daily basis from idea labs @haidut along with my expensive drugs Xtandi and Firmagon. I also notice a very positive response with Progesterone (approx. 200mg per day).
 

Travis

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"The most powerful natural inhibitors of glyoxylase I are baicalein, lapachol, and β-lapachone—the latter two found in Pau d'Arco " I now take Lapodin on a daily basis from idea labs @haidut along with my expensive drugs Xtandi and Firmagon. I also notice a very positive response with Progesterone (approx. 200mg per day).
It's nice seeing a person going right out and say 'don't do this!' I lack the personal experience to say such a thing, but theoretically no person with cancer should eat linoleic acid. This fatty is consistently the fatty acid most associated with cancer, having no real beneficial effects. The other polyunsaturated fatty acids (i.e. DHA) are only beneficial in the extent that they inhibit linoleic acid, the worst one, but the saturated stearic acid can do this too (found in chocolate, this keeps arachidontate and linoleate from being incorporated into the cell membrane).

And the pathway seems solid:

linoleic acid ⟶ arachidonic acid ⟶ prostaglandin E₂ ⟶ ornithine decarboxylase ⟶ polyamines ⟶ proliferation!

You can find much confirmation for every step, as well as data showing dietary linoleic acid and prostaglandin E₂ causing cancer proliferation directly.

Also good appears to be selenomethionine, which inhibits polyamine synthesis. If I had cancer, I'd take selenomethionine and β-lapachone.
 

Obi-wan

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Hey Travis, would ordinary Selenium inhibit polyamine synthesis as well as selenomethionine?
 

Sheila

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Dear Mr Travis,
Thank you for your comprehensive contributions to this forum, I appreciate them and the time you spend, your clever wit and turn of phrase, indeed even some whimsy in places! Embiggen should indeed have a larger place in vocabularies.
Anyway, i would also be interested in your considerations on selenium since Dr Koch warned against its use in his work.
Thank you again,
Sheila
 

Obi-wan

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Just checked my bottle of Selenium, made from high selenium yeast which is an excellent source of naturally occurring organic L. Selenomethionine
 

Travis

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Hey Travis, would ordinary Selenium inhibit polyamine synthesis as well as selenomethionine?
Selenium is good, but doesn't seem as powerful. Selenomethionine is a legitimate amino acid is incorporated into proteins at the expense of methionine; our bodies cannot even tell the difference, and there seems to be no limit how much selenomethionine can substitute for methionine. In muscle tissue, it had been found that Asians have about 5× the amount as Americans and Canadians; New Zealanders had the lowest.

The active polyamine is formed from one molecule of ornithine and two molecules of methionine. The ornithine is usually derived from arginine through the enzyme arginase, but arginine can become many things: it can be used instead to produce nitric oxide, proteins, and even become the fluorescent hydroxyimidazalone after reacting with methylglyoxal. Selenomethionine can do everything methionine can do and more, and it doesn't have the chance to become a polyamine.

Besides pau d'arco, selenomethionine seem like good choice. I'm always looking for the most effective molecules, and this seems like a very safe and effective amino acid.
 

Travis

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Just checked my bottle of Selenium, made from high selenium yeast which is an excellent source of naturally occurring organic L. Selenomethionine
Yes, that's it. One of the famous selenomethionine cancer studies had used yeast. If I recall correctly, the selenomethionine concentration was 200·μg.
 

Obi-wan

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I have read that Selenium is toxic in higher concentrations. My bottle is 200 mcg per capsule. I take 1 per day
 

Travis

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Dear Mr Travis,
Thank you for your comprehensive contributions to this forum, I appreciate them and the time you spend, your clever wit and turn of phrase, indeed even some whimsy in places! Embiggen should indeed have a larger place in vocabularies.
Anyway, i would also be interested in your considerations on selenium since Dr Koch warned against its use in his work.
Thank you again,
Sheila
Thanks. I did read about five studies on selenomethionine, because I'm a writer and do like science. I focused on selenomethionine because it has a very intuitive chemical pathway: inhibiting polyamine synthesis! I know that some studies showed some correlations with inorganic selenium ions, but they weren't nearly as powerful. Selenium when replacing sulfur in methionine is an entire different animal, and is more effective.

Now you're making me wonder what Koch had said about inorganic selenium ions?
 

Obi-wan

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Although selenium is an essential trace element, it is toxic if taken in excess. Exceeding the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of 400 micrograms per day can lead to selenosis.[104] This 400 µg Tolerable Upper Intake Level is based primarily on a 1986 study of five Chinese patients who exhibited overt signs of selenosis and a follow up study on the same five people in 1992.[105] The 1992 study actually found the maximum safe dietary Se intake to be approximately 800 micrograms per day (15 micrograms per kilogram body weight), but suggested 400 micrograms per day to avoid creating an imbalance of nutrients in the diet and to accord with data from other countries.[106] In China, people who ingested corn grown in extremely selenium-rich stony coal (carbonaceous shale) have suffered from selenium toxicity. This coal was shown to have selenium content as high as 9.1%, the highest concentration in coal ever recorded.[107]

Signs and symptoms of selenosis include a garlic odor on the breath, gastrointestinal disorders, hair loss, sloughing of nails, fatigue, irritability, and neurological damage. Extreme cases of selenosis can exhibit cirrhosis of the liver, pulmonary edema, or death.[108] Elemental selenium and most metallic selenides have relatively low toxicities because of low bioavailability. By contrast, selenates and selenites have an oxidant mode of action similar to that of arsenic trioxide and are very toxic. The chronic toxic dose of selenite for humans is about 2400 to 3000 micrograms of selenium per day.[109] Hydrogen selenide is an extremely toxic, corrosive gas.[110] Selenium also occurs in organic compounds, such as dimethyl selenide, selenomethionine, selenocysteine and methylselenocysteine, all of which have high bioavailability and are toxic in large doses.

On 19 April 2009, 21 polo ponies died shortly before a match in the United States Polo Open. Three days later, a pharmacy released a statement explaining that the horses had received an incorrect dose of one of the ingredients used in a vitamin/mineral supplement compound that had been incorrectly compounded by a compounding pharmacy. Analysis of blood levels of inorganic compounds in the supplement indicated the selenium concentrations were ten to fifteen times higher than normal in the blood samples, and 15 to 20 times higher than normal in the liver samples. Selenium was later confirmed to be the toxic factor.[111]

I think I am safe at 200 mcg's of organic selenium
 

Obi-wan

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I could take 12 capsules a day and still be safe
 

Amazoniac

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Dear Mr Travis,
Thank you for your comprehensive contributions to this forum, I appreciate them and the time you spend, your clever wit and turn of phrase, indeed even some whimsy in places! Embiggen should indeed have a larger place in vocabularies.
Anyway, i would also be interested in your considerations on selenium since Dr Koch warned against its use in his work.
Thank you again,
Sheila
Thou cordial lordess, allow me to intrude here with this passage:
William F. Koch Research Site
Our desire is to provide all of the building units for tissue reconstruction as well as the dynamic materials needed for activation of the vital processes. These come from the soil and are modified by plants so as to be ready for use in the animal tissues. We include, as part of the characteristics of the soil, the minerals carried in subterranean water. The water should not carry the volcanic or putrefactive sulphides, selenium, or other metals in toxic quantities; yet the trace metals should be present in adequate quantities that are in the homeopathic dosage Nature intended.
As far as I know, there weren't as many publications on its role in health as there were for toxicity (which was the focus of the research back then).

Have you read this?
Cautionary Tale / Eat Selenium
 

Travis

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Thou cordial lordess, allow me to intrude here with this passage:
William F. Koch Research Site

As far as I know, there weren't as many publications on its role in health as there were for toxicity (which was the focus of the research back then).

Have you read this?
Cautionary Tale / Eat Selenium
Yeah. I know plants can handle selenium; they incorporate it into methionine just like yeast, and then make proteins out of that. So naturally, nearly all of our ingested selenium would have been from selenomethionine since groundwater is somewhat unnatural.

We actually do eat selenomethionine every day in small amounts, in food.
 

Sheila

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Greetings dear Amazoniac, Master of Mineralism,
Thank you for your thoughts and interjections. I have indeed read that thread and many others in which you have so kindly contributed mineralised must-knows to this forum. Long may you continue, i marvel at your stamina.
Now, to the metalloid at hand - Dr Koch continues....

“The selenium exists in two forms, inorganic and in organic combination. The former is more easily eliminated from the system, but it is the amount that kills, not the particular form in which it is taken. Fortunately it is known that selenium exists in the heavy clay-like soil, while sandy soil and coral reef soils do not contain it. Therefore, foods like rye, that are grown on sand, are free from this poison. This is one reason rye should be eaten instead of wheat, which is grown mostly on the heavy soils where selenium abounds.”

.......The choice of foods calls for the avoidance of selenium containing wheat, peas, corn, etc. and the avoidance of foods poisoned with insecticides. It is within the power of the Food and Drug Administration to correct the whole food poisoning situation, and just now the public’s worry over insecticide and carcinogenic contaminations of our foods is calling for some protective action. But this action is even now as stingy as it can be and no protections against Selenium contaminations are offered as yet. If such neglect continues, it will be necessary for those who are able to organize their own farming services and see to it that the ground is fertilized scientifically by organic procedures so the plants are correctly nourished, healthy and resistant to insect attack. In fact, it attack the sickly plants rather than good healthy stock. Selenium-free soil will be used, and crops rotated wisely."

And so dear Amazoniac, you may be correct in thinking that Dr Koch was more concerned with the risks coming to light re Se at the time. But, this is a man whose understanding of chemistry in living things was profound and he is suggesting 'homeopathic' doses. Would that not be less than mcg? Were his reagents not similarly dilute?

Best wishes,
Sheila
 

Obi-wan

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Selenium is an important trace mineral and a constituent of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase, which is necessary for neutralizing the free radical, hydrogen peroxide, as well as other lipid peroxides (oxidized fats).*

Selenium's beneficial role is not limited to its antioxidant function; it is also necessary for conversion of the thyroid hormone T4 (thyroxine) to active T3 (triiodothyronine).* Selenium also appears to exert important positive effects on normal cell function and cell development.*

Numerous epidemiological studies have found that maintaining normal serum selenium levels can be associated with support of normal cell function and differentiation, as well as healthy heart, connective tissue, eye, liver, and thyroid function.* Selenium supplementation also may exert a protective effect against mercury, cadmium, and other heavy metal toxicities.* -from Thorne
 

Obi-wan

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Selenomethionine contains 200 mcg of selenium bound to the amino acid methionine. It is a well-absorbed form of selenium.* A significant body of research supports its benefit in numerous situations, including healthy thyroid function and support for oncology patients.* -from Thorne
 
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