Copper

Discussion in 'Minerals' started by jyb, Aug 31, 2013.

  1. jyb

    jyb Member

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    http://charles_w.tripod.com/copper3.html

    Just a general article on copper. A lot of facts are familiar for the RP reader, and he makes interesting observations. Other facts are bit more surprising (see for example his take on copper deficiency in milk, that needs to be compensated by eating liver).
     
  2. OP
    jyb

    jyb Member

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    I'm reading this link again and I'm surprised no one commented. It's really interesting. Read the milk paragraph. Of course the deficiency he suggests are less of a concern for someone having orange juice and liver regularly.
     
  3. SaltGirl

    SaltGirl Member

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  4. TigerBoy

    TigerBoy New Member

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    My feritin level is sky high too. I had it tested in February, and I came in at 757 ng/ml.
    The range on that test was 30-400ng/ml.
    My iron serum was 214. Normal range is 40-155.
    I have since donated blood once, and will donate again in late April.
    I want to increase my copper intake, but if I eat liver for the copper, won't I be eating a high level of iron too?
    I would much rather supplement with copper. I have a copper supplement from Swanson called chelated copper. It is copper glycinate chealate. Why would that not be safe?
    http://www.swansonvitamins.com/swanson- ... mg-60-caps
     
  5. OP
    jyb

    jyb Member

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    The body doesn't absorb all of the iron in the food, there is a cap, whereas I think that is less the case with copper. So with liver you'd have one serving of iron, but potentially a lot of copper. Also, if you eat your meat with coffee or calcium, it may limit iron intake while promoting copper a bit (I remember a study showing calcium carbonate was pro-copper).

    The supplement you linked to looks okay, though there are one with a bit less ingredients, like those from PureEncapsulations. But the pill powder can be dissolved in water, to remove the residue. The water tastes metallic to me, so I have no doubt that it does dissolve in water.
     
  6. Mittir

    Mittir Member

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    Ferritin level alone is not a good indicator of iron storage.
    Iron Saturation Index and Ferritin level together provides
    more accurate information on iron storage.
    RP mentioned that saturation index below 25 % is
    protective against cancer. Body usually converts
    stored iron into Ferritin during disease (Including hypothyroidism)
    and when inflammation is high.
    Ferritin is a more stable and harmless state of iron.
    He also mentioned that people with high iron storage
    should be careful with large dose of anti-oxidant/ reducing agents,
    especially vitamin C. They not only increase absorption from
    intestine while eaten with high iron food, they also do the damage when
    inside the body. Shell fish is a rich source of copper,low in iron. Oyster is very high iron too.
    Beef liver has a good ratio of copper to iron than chicken and lamb livers. RP thinks most
    commercial supplements are problematic for it's poor quality and possible contaminations.
     
  7. SaltGirl

    SaltGirl Member

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    Found this:

    "Lynch and Strain(1989) also reported an effect of type of dietary fat on hepatic copper. They studied weanling, male Wistar rats fed diets containing 20% by weight of either coconut or safflower oil with two different copper contents(0.4 and 11 ppm) for 56 days. In rats fed the adequate copper diets, the liver copper content significantly less (7.5 vs 18.2 ug/g wet weight) when safflower oil was the fat source. Similarly, safflower oil significantly decreased hepatic copper in the rats fed the copper-deficient diet (7.5 vs 8.1 ug/g wet weight).
    The findings of these animal studies indicate that consumption of a diet consisting of predominantly polyunsaturated fatty acids can depress zinc and copper status."

    From Fatty Acids in Foods and their Health Implications, Second edition.

    http://books.google.is/books?id=zg12ZkX ... fa&f=false
     
  8. SaltGirl

    SaltGirl Member

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  9. TigerBoy

    TigerBoy New Member

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    Thank you JYB for your comments.

    Since my last post, I found out I was a carrier of one the gene mutations for hemochromatosis. Thus my issues with iron accumulation. Since around March, I have also quit supplementing with Vitamin C during meals. In fact, I have quit supplementing C all together.
     
  10. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    I would not be surprised if that "hemochromatosis" healed itself now that you are off the C. :)
     
  11. SaltGirl

    SaltGirl Member

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    I don't remember where I saw it, but I once read a discussion that hemochromatosis might be a different expression of copper deficiency. Of course, it has never been tested so I don't know if that holds true or not.
     
  12. mujuro

    mujuro Member

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    I just took 4mg copper glycinate about 30 minutes ago, and although I felt a slight nausea at first, boy do I feel hot. I'm almost sweating. I feel a radiating warmth from my abdominal cavity.
     
  13. churchmouth

    churchmouth Member

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    Any insights from the copper supplementation? Was the heat a good thing?
     
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