Copper May Treat Als

Discussion in 'Health' started by haidut, Jun 14, 2014.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    The study of course tries to talk about how they have discovered a "special" (and likely patented) method of copper delivery to the cell, but the main message is that boosting copper levels in the cells increased lifespan of ALS rodents by 26%. Since copper is the crucial compound for cytochrome C oxidase, this study supports Ray's views on ALS being a bioenergetic disorder, with potentially straightforward treatment. Let's hope this research will have follow up.

    http://oregonstate.edu/ua/ncs/archives/ ... 9s-disease

    "...“The damage from ALS is happening primarily in the spinal cord and that’s also one of the most difficult places in the body to absorb copper,” Beckman said. “Copper itself is necessary but can be toxic, so its levels are tightly controlled in the body. The therapy we’re working toward delivers copper selectively into the cells in the spinal cord that actually need it. Otherwise, the compound keeps copper inert.”
    “This is a safe way to deliver a micronutrient like copper exactly where it is needed,” Beckman said.
    By restoring a proper balance of copper into the brain and spinal cord, scientists believe they are stabilizing the superoxide dismutase in its mature form, while improving the function of mitochondria. This has already extended the lifespan of affected mice by 26 percent, and with continued research the scientists hope to achieve even more extension."
     
  2. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    Very interesting. ALS seems to have a strong link to supraphysiological levels of testosterone, so this may be particularly beneficial alongside many of the androgenic effects of supplements such as zinc and Vitamin E.

    Do you think that 2 mg of copper glycinate will still provide these benefits? I would be wary to go much higher for fear of neurotoxicity.
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    That dose actually was found to be optimal in a human study with nurses. They had 3 groups taking 2mg, 4mg, and 6mg copper daily. Both the 4mg and 6mg groups had symptoms of copper toxicity even though the 4mg group only had nausea and no change in blood tests. The 2mg group was doing fine and it improved their copper status and raised their ceruloplasmin.
    Ray said that to him testosterone is almost as dangerous as estrogen, and he mentioned the connection between T and ALS as well. In my opinion the only two steroids worth raising exogenously are progesterone and DHT. Pregnenolone is also fine but most of it does not stay as pregnenolone but metabolizes downstream. As far as I know DHT may actually treat ALS. See below.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22606355
    http://www.alsa.org/news/archive/new-als-research-findings.html
     
  4. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    That's very promising. So do you see any problem with using Proviron (DHT cream)? It seems like Privoron doesn't suppress the HPTA to the degree of Anavar, another DHT analogue, but I'll need to do some more research. I'd think that it would be dose dependent, similar to the estrogenic effect of high doses of DHEA.

    I found this study on concerning exogenous DHT supplementation.


    Mesterolone seems superior to fluoxymesterone due its lack of effects on TBG, but the researchers reported that even fluoxymesterone did not affect thyroid function. I'll see if I can do some more reading.
     
  5. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I think small doses of DHEA are the best way to raise tissue levels of DHT. Topical is probably best for DHT conversion but oral works as well if each dose is kept under 5mg. And with DHEA, even if you raise DHT to supaphysiological levels there will be no HPTA suppression.
     
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