CO2 Decreases Mast Cell Sensitivity

Discussion in 'Health' started by Diokine, Apr 3, 2016.

  1. Diokine

    Diokine Member

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    Treatment of mast cells with carbon dioxide suppresses degranulation via a novel mechanism involving repression of increased intracellular calcium levels.
    Results from this study provide the first evidence of a unique regulatory mechanism by which CO₂ inhibits mast cell degranulation and histamine release by repressing stimulated increases in intracellular calcium. Thus, our data provide a plausible explanation for the reported therapeutic benefit of noninhaled intranasal delivery of 100% CO₂ to treat allergic rhinitis.

    Influence of hyposensitization of ATP level and CO2 production of mast cells in anaphylaxis.



    There has been a lot of talk on histamine lately, which I think is a good thing because of it's broad implications in health. I'm putting together an article currently that discusses the role of histamine and serotonin in the body. The takeaway point is that conditions like food sensitivity, allergies, and even anaphylaxis can be explained bioenergetically. This can explain why people who have low metabolic status (thyroid function, nutrient levels, etc.,) tend to be very sensitive to histamine. Additionally, genetic polymorphisms in diamine oxidase (the enzyme that breaks down histamine) can cause higher levels of histamine.

    Histamine works by setting up the cell for stress. A structural change occurs that causes the cell to take up calcium and "swell" with water. CO2 production drops and energy production is greatly diminished. With this information, it is easy to see that improving whole body energetics cannot happen effectively without a proper understanding of the stress reaction, and how histamine plays a large part in that reaction.

    CO2 elimination by high-frequency oscillations in dogs--effects of histamine infusion.
    Carbon dioxide balance in rat stomach and peripheral tissue: effects of histamine.
    The action of carbon dioxide on constricted airways.





     
  2. PakPik

    PakPik Member

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    Thanks Diokine! It's valuable to connect the dots between metabolism and immunity.

    I wanted to mention that, in researching immunology subjects, I came across one of the leading scientists (he is both a biologist and and MD, btw) of mast cell research. He said, plain and simple, that it is crazy to blame everything on histamine:
    "it wasn't until a few years ago that mast cells where shown to contain, in addition to histamine, about a hundred other molecules which in fact are more potent than histamine in doing all kinds of crazy things to the body." http://blogtalk.vo.llnwd.net/o23/show/7/324/show_7324543.mp3


    Since you're interested in this subject, I recommend that interview to you by Dr. Theoharides.

    Taming the inflammatory response and balancing the immune system will stabilize mast cells, etc, so that not only histamine, but serotonin, PUFA eicosanoids (these are waaaay worse than histamine, and produced by immune reactions), inflammatory cytokines, etc will be brought to a better behaviour. CO2 helps stabilize all these things.
     
  3. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    this is great!
     
  4. Thoushant

    Thoushant Member

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  5. Drareg

    Drareg Member

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    This is a great find,thanks and thanks for the bump.

    Those with mastocytosis could find relief from the co2 full body bags I'm guessing. They currently know nothing about mastocytosis.
     
  6. OP
    Diokine

    Diokine Member

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    Oh yes... great stuff! I haven't been looking too much at CO2 recently, but when I was reading a lot about it I was pretty convinced that you can explain nearly any dis-eased cellular state by a lack of production or retention of CO2.
     
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