1. Cocoa Butter - Organic & Fair Trade Certified
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. **NEW** BL11 - Orange, Red & Infrared Therapy Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Charcoal Soap - For Deep Cleansing
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Orange & Red Light Therapy Device - LGS1
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  5. Organic Cocoa Powder
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  6. Metabasoap - Handcrafted Soap
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  7. Cascara Sagrada Powder From Farmalabor In Italy
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  8. **NEW Mini Body Light** MBL1 - Orange & Red Light Therapy Mini Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice

Changes In Thiamine Levels May Be The First Sign Of Type I Diabetes

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Oct 17, 2016.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    15,910
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    USA / Europe
    The study is focusing on the fashionable topic of "microbiome analysis", which is most likely a fad that won't lead to any breakthrough cures. However, the important finding of the study is that changes of vitamin B1 (thiamine) levels are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Sudden drop in blood thiamine levels can possibly be used as an early biomarker of diabetes I onset.

    http://www.nature.com/articles/nmicrobiol2016180
    Change in gut bacteria in type 1 diabetes could affect disease development

    "...They didn't notice a stark difference in bacterial species between people with and without diabetes, as opposed to what has long been believed by scientists. However, they did see clear differences in what the bacteria did. And in type 1 diabetes, these differences tend to arise when the body's immune system attacks beta cells. By changing thiamine levels, the once beneficial bacteria become a health risk and can worsen the patient's condition. Researchers are yet to determine whether the gut bacteria preferably increased or decreased thiamine levels in that case. Previous studies have suggested that a deficiency of thiamine is more harmful than an increase in the body's thiamine levels. In patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, it may increase the risk of developing microvascular complications, like retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, from the effects of high blood sugar. These results have two implications: one is that high dose therapy with thiamine may counter the development of common complications of diabetes associated with a high risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality; the other is that a sudden decrease in thiamine levels may be used as a biomarker in the early stages of type 1 diabetes."
     
  2. Soren

    Soren Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2016
    Messages:
    694
    Gender:
    Male
    Hi Haidut. My brother has just been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (had a blood sugar level of 495!) went in to the hospital with diabetic ketoacidosis he lost about 40 kilos in weight in a couple of months. He has long had problems with his gut and digestion for many years which I believe is from eating too much pufa and junk as well as excessive drinking.

    I've always suspected that diabetes has a lot to do with issues in the gut and this study seems to lend some weight to that assessment. I'm hoping this serves as a bit of a wake up call for him and he will listen to me more in regards to his diet and lifestyle. Unfortunately the doctors are telling him the standard type 1 dogma which is the disease is genetic and he would have got it anyway but I think he knows that it is his lifestyle and diet choices that have caused it.

    My question to you is, if the disease is an auto-immune condition whereby the body attacks the pancreas, and if that auto-immune response starts in the gut, do you think that if one were to normalise that environment that the condition could be reversed?

    Also any other sources or info you could point me to would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  3. Soren

    Soren Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2016
    Messages:
    694
    Gender:
    Male
    Just found a study that seems to reinforce the gut diabetes connection specifically with regard to type 1.

    Duodenal Mucosa of Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Shows Distinctive Inflammatory Profile and Microbiota

    Link to Science Daily Article: Type 1 diabetes linked to gut inflammation, bacteria changes

    "Our findings indicate the individuals with Type 1 diabetes have an inflammatory signature and microbiome that differ from what we see in people who do not have diabetes or even in those with other autoimmune conditions such as celiac disease,"

    "Some researchers have theorized that the gut may contribute to the development of Type 1 diabetes, so it is important to understand how the disease affects the digestive system and microbiome."

    This is the part that is key from my point of view,

    "We don't know if Type 1 diabetes' signature effect on the gut is caused by or the result of the body's own attacks on the pancreas," Piemonti said. "By exploring this, we may be able to find new ways to treat the disease by targeting the unique gastrointestinal characteristics of individuals with Type 1 diabetes."

    I would argue that there is another very obvious question that the researchers are missing. Which is could it be that the gut inflammation is the cause of the body's attack on the pancreas and thereby the cause of the inflammation?

    I feel like this is a pretty obvious question to pose and am surprised it is not put forth. However, I have not read the full study yet and only the science daily article so maybe it is there somewhere.
     
  4. Soren

    Soren Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2016
    Messages:
    694
    Gender:
    Male
    Reading through the study they point out that those with type 1 diabetes have certain inflammatory markers in the gut (mainly cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors) in a much higher ratio than in people without;

    "Ten genes (CCL13, CCL19, CCL22, CCR2, IL4R, CD68, COX2, PTX3, TNFα, and VEGFA) were significantly more expressed in patients with T1D but not in patients with CD (celiac disease) compared with CTRL subjects"

    I am not familiar with all of these "genes" but I believe many of them are elevated by endotoxin.

    Which would lend credit to the study linked below which shows that endotoxin may be the cause of type 1 diabetes,

    [Intestinal endotoxin in induction of type 1 diabetes].
    "The blood serum level of intestinal flora endotoxin was studied in 45 children and adolescents aged 3–17 years with type 1 diabetes mellitus. In all the patients the endotoxin levels 2.89 ± 0.33 EU/ml) were significantly elevated compared to the control group (0.4 ± 0.03 EU/ml). A higher level of endotoxin at the disease onset (3.93 ± 0.79 EU/ml) compared to that in children afflicted with diabetes for more than two years (2.37 ± 0.27 EU/ml) gives evidence of the involvement of endotoxin in the initiation of the disease.. "
     
  5. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    15,910
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    USA / Europe
    Excess of PUFA in the blood, as well as high NO levels is what causes damage to the pancreas. There have been studies on reversing early stages diabetes I with high doses niacinamide as it both lowers FFA and NO in the blood. Adding thiamine to that would not hurt either. Peat's father also apparently fixed his diabetes with Brewer's yeast which is very high in B vitamins. If you search the forum for "niacinamide diabetes" you should be able to find the studies.
     
Loading...