1. **NEW Mini Body Light** MBL1 - Orange & Red Light Therapy Mini Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Cholesterol Powder
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Pau D'arco Bark
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Metabasoap - Handcrafted Soap
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  5. Cocoa Butter - Organic & Fair Trade Certified
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  6. Orange & Red Light Therapy Device - LGS1
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  7. Cascara Sagrada Powder From Farmalabor In Italy
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Therapy Reduces Belly Fat In Humans

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Jun 14, 2018.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    13,385
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    USA / Europe
    Finally some good news out of mainstream medicine! I am quite happy to see that the crucial role of carbon dioxide in health and metabolism is finally being recognized. This was a human study, which makes it even more relevant. Finally, given that belly fat is primarily driven by cortisol is suggests that measures that raise CO2 levels may help reduce cortisol's effects in other parts of the body. I posted threads on thiamine and acetazolamide having cortisol-reducing effects, and recently I also found out that methylene blue and vitamin E also have anti-cortisol effects (through inhibition of HSP70). Thyroid, progesterone, sugar, and various quinones also raise CO2 levels.

    https://news.northwestern.edu/index.php/stories/2018/june/carbon-dioxide-reduces-belly-fat/
    "...The first randomized, controlled trial testing carbon dioxide gas injections (carboxytherapy) to reduce belly fat found the new technique eliminates fat around the stomach. However, the changes were modest and did not result in long-term fat reduction, according to the Northwestern Medicine study. “Carboxytherapy could potentially be a new and effective means of fat reduction,” said lead author Dr. Murad Alam, vice chair of dermatology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a Northwestern Medicine physician. “It still needs to be optimized, though, so it’s long lasting.” The paper was published this week in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology."
     
Loading...