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Can't Stop Fish Oil Supplementation

Discussion in 'Diet' started by Logan-, Jun 19, 2018.

  1. Logan-

    Logan- Member

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    I have Crohn's and arthritis, and have been taking nearly 5 grams of Carlson's liquid fish oil every day. I would like to stop the supplementation; but whenever I stop taking it, I get flare ups within 2 days. Fish oil is extremely helpful for controlling these diseases.

    I am wondering if anyone is on the same/similar boat as me? The main reason why I want to stop taking fish oil is to reduce lipid peroxidation in my brain.
     
  2. Ryan

    Ryan Member

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    I know you understand AIP, because you gave a response on my forum. My recommendation would be to eat closer to aip, and by that I mean lots of fruits/veggies/antioxidants. It helped me more than fish oil did back in the day, and fish oil did help with pains (likely by suppressing immune function).

    You can always try aspirin too. Like fish oil, it is an anti inflammatory supplement; without the negative impact on immune function.
     
  3. johnwester130

    johnwester130 Member

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  4. OP
    Logan-

    Logan- Member

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    Thanks. Found these:
     
  5. TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Your Crohn's and arthritis might both be caused by bacteria in your gut and the endotoxin that they produce.
     
  6. EIRE24

    EIRE24 Member

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    How would you propose to fix this?
     
  7. TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Killing the bacteria, cleaning up the endotoxin.
     
  8. johnwester130

    johnwester130 Member

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    raw carrot salad
    vitamin b2
    coconut oil
     
  9. TreasureVibe

    TreasureVibe Member

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    Activated charcoal for the endotoxin?
     
  10. Fisherman94

    Fisherman94 Member

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    No its not bacteria. Its upregulated mitochondrial fission from excessive ROS. And ROS from mitochondrial fission. And high histamine, low methylation, low potassium, thus not enough cortisol, and this ROS / h2o2 destroys your gut barrier. And fatty-acid producing bacteria like butyrate. :2cents:
     
  11. Motif

    Motif Member

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    Why you think low potassium could be a thing?
     
  12. benaoao

    benaoao Member

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  13. Energizer

    Energizer Member

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    Many of the symptoms of Crohn's seem to share a lot of similarities with hypothyroidism. I wouldn't rule out the possibility even with "adequate" bloodwork. The tests are normed on hypothyroid people. You can see if your pulse is at least 70-95bpm and oral temperature around 98.6 by mid-day, if they are below that is usually a sign of hypothyroidism.

    Doctors are rarely attentive to the thyroid from my experience but it's central to most health problems. Blood work can be useful if interpreted by the right person but often people are pushed back and told they are "fine" and their thyroid function is "good" when the exact opposite is true. I have seen many people on forums with all hypothyroid symptoms saying their doctor told them their thyroid is fine, including in this forum.
     
  14. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    :emoji_thinking:
     
  15. Kartoffel

    Kartoffel Member

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    Hmmm
     
  16. Fisherman94

    Fisherman94 Member

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    You know what I mean :D
    cause =/= consequence

    Otherwise you could keep saying its the "immune system" overreacting. And I think you can easily spot that as not being the cause. Those are consequences.
     
  17. Kartoffel

    Kartoffel Member

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    I hmmed because you first say it's not bacteria and then finish by saying that it's fatty acid producing bacteria. Little bit of a contradiction.
    By the way, it's pretty well established that chronically elevated cortisol is a cause of colitis. If you doubt that you might wanna read Sapolsky's Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers. Cortisol can be useful for short term management of colitis and ulcers, but the underlying problem is surely not a chronic cortisol deficiency.
    Histamine seems to play an important role in the development of chronic inflammation in the gut, but before you dismiss the role of bacteria you should note that histamine is one of the most important mediators of endotoxic inflammation resulting from bacteria.
    I am not sure what you mean by low potassium, but since low systemic potassium is virtually non-existent I can't see how this would be an important factor. I also don't know where you would get the idea that colitis is characterized by low methylation, when the connection between increased methylation, inflammation, colitis, and cancer is so well established. For example, RARB, a gene previously identified as a tumor suppressor in colorectal adenocarcinoma is turned of by the increased methylation in colitis. Colitis is a hypermethylated state! I seriously recommend you read this good review on methylation and colitis. You can get the full text via sci-hub.

    " In conclusion, we have shown a step-wise increase in methylation status of the genome between a healthy colon, a quiescent and an inflamed UC colon. Data have been collated in relation to inflammatory genes, individual SNPs, methylation status, phenotype and presentation. Although the aetiological role of methylation remains contested, there is evidence for specific methylation alterations in genes involved in the inflammatory process, such as ESR1, CD1 and BRINP3, both upstream and downstream of inflammation in UC, and of the relationship between methylation status andclinical phenotypes. This gives credence to the theor yof UC as a model of mucosal inflammatory process driven by epigenetic markers." (Davidson, Nwokolo, Arasaradnam 2016)

    Epigenomics. 2016 May;8(5):667-84. doi: 10.2217/epi-2016-0006. Epub 2016 Apr 20.
    A systematic review of the role of DNA methylation on inflammatory genes in ulcerative colitis.
    Gould NJ1, Davidson KL1, Nwokolo CU2, Arasaradnam RP2,3.

    BACKGROUND:
    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an idiopathic disease of the large intestine with evidence pointing to the role of epigenetic changes.

    METHODS
    Searches were performed in three databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE and Web of Science), following PRISMA protocol. DNA methylation was the only epigenetic mechanism affecting genes linked to inflammatory response in UC.

    RESULTS:
    A total of 25 differentially methylated inflammatory genes were identified. Hypermethylation of miR-1247 significantly correlates (p = 0.0006) with refractory UC while PAR2 hypermethylation correlates (p = 0.007) with corticosteroid dependence.

    CONCLUSION:
    Evidence points to a step-wise increase in methylation status of the genome between a healthy colon, quiescent UC and when inflamed. Inflammatory genes (which are aberrantly methylated), have also been implicated in cancer development in UC.
     
  18. Fisherman94

    Fisherman94 Member

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    Well I did not say its low cortisol to begin with. Never said low cortisol is the cause for it.

    I for example did not have elevated cortisol levels for the last 5 years. And you woudnt have high histamine levels if you would have cortisol working good.
    And yes, histamine plays an important role, thats why a lot of UC people use cortisol with antihistamines. Even if it does not directly lower histamine in the gut.

    Btw not talking about blood levels of K. You pretty much see high or low levels of K only in hospital and with serious problems. Doesnt mean you have sufficienty K with good blood levels.


    yeah, I noticed that you are very petty since I argued with about gut bacteria :D Really searching for my posts lol
    Just wanted to help someone on the right track, but you go. Im out.
     
  19. Kartoffel

    Kartoffel Member

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    How is that petty? I simply pointed out that you completely contradicted your central statement, which was it's not bacteria. And when did we argue about bacteria before? If you are not talking about potassium blood levels, then what are you talking about?
    Why did you not respond to what I wrote about methylation and colitis? You said colitis is characterized by low methylation, yet you don't provide any evidence for that claim or specifiy what you mean by that, and completely ignore my evidence to the contrary...how is that helping someone out?
     
  20. mostlylurking

    mostlylurking Member

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    Well, finally somebody mentioned thyroid. I am hypothyroid with a history of leaky gut, strong gluten sensitivity, and arthritis (rheumatoid). All my symptoms went away (including the joint pain/inflammation and the gut issues) by taking a natural desiccated thyroid med (180 mg/day) and following Dr. Peat's advice on diet: no nuts, no seeds, no grains, no PUFA, lots of Great Lakes gelatin (green can), lots of OJ, lots of milk, raw carrot every day. Also cascara sagrada, b vitamins, etc., aspirin (1 to 3 times/day), magnesium, calcium, and lots of bio-identical progesterone.

    Worked for me. I've been doing this protocol for 3 and a half years. I think it was the PUFA that messed me up originally when I was a kid. I've been on thyroid meds for about 35 years, but my symptoms persisted until I doubled the dose of thyroid med and cleaned up my diet. Getting enough thyroid medication was a real battle; it took about 9 months of badgering the doctor but he finally came around. I do not understand why doctors are so super conservative when prescribing thyroid meds. It's frustrating.

    I was able to cancel the surgery that was scheduled for my thumb joints. Now I still sleep in a thumb brace on one hand but the pain is gone and I have normal strength in my hands. No need for surgery. No need for the scary pharmaceutical drugs. I'm doing well.
     
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