Can't Find Much Discussion On Onions Or Garlic

Discussion in 'Spices' started by messtafarian, Sep 13, 2013.

  1. messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

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    I love potatoes in coconut oil, or boiled, and I've been eating masa harina chips fried in coconut oil also and I could basically eat this for breakfast lunch and dinner every day for the rest of my life, with a little cheese, cottage cheese, or queso fresco.

    But it's a little bland. I dropped pepper and all spices although I'm considering adding back ginger and turmeric -- even though they are both estrogenic. I've been looking for any statements from RP about onions and garlic and haven't found anything. I know a lot of people eat them -- saw a reference to quercetin and I can't figure out if its estrogenic or not.

    Anybody have an guidance here?
     
  2. Dutchie

    Dutchie Member

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    Why are spices estrogenic,especially fresh ginger? I never heard of that.
     
  3. OP
    messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

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    It depends on the substance. Ginger has melatonin and contains phytoestrogen. Turmeric shows estrogenic effects in rats. Etc.
     
  4. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    I LOVE garlic, however, there has been discussion here about how strong it is, and how it can irritate the stomach and whatever else is down there. I noticed with me it was causing indigestion, so I stopped it.

    One person said take a piece of garlic and tape it to your skin for a few minutes and watch what happens. It burns it. Yeh, no thanks my belly says. :lol:

    I still eat onion on occasion. I just chop it up super fine, and then make sure to cook it up very well.
     
  5. 4peatssake

    4peatssake Member

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    Same here, although I confess to adding a little garlic to sauted mushrooms now and again when I have steak. Rare occasions now. One of the few things I miss.
     
  6. Dutchie

    Dutchie Member

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    Theres this herb,in germany they call it Barlauch,wild garlic. It has the same taste,yet i didnt find it aggravating like real garlic.

    Andreas Moritz has a vid on youtube about the dangers of garlic. I hope you can make it through the vid if interested,bc his voice is so monotonous....good remedy to combat insomnia :p
     
  7. pboy

    pboy Member

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    Mustard has goitrogens, onion and garlic have querticin which inhibits or makes more difficult the thyroids job of absorbing iodine, ginger seems like theres
    something funky in it...though it takes more to realize. Probably chili's, and black pepper would be the safest for longer term use, but many complain they can create burning sensations. Theres also the lesser spices that have a hint of spicy notes, such as cloves, allspice, cinnamon, basil, oregano...I can't comment on how they may or may not be good.

    One thing to note...many older systems associate acids and spices to the fire element, which is a necessary part of a healthy diet...to move blood out and up, to the skin and head, thereby keeping brain and skin function cleaner. Spices are obviously from spices, acids are in fruit and alcohol and I guess a small amount in other fermented foods. It seems that the only way to get any fire in a Peat recommended diet would be citrus (orange) juice, but because of the water and sugar content it sort of cancels itself out.
    I get the idea, from personal experience, that at least a few times a week its a good idea to have something really spicy or get almost drunk, basically to force yourself to sweat and get blood to the head...to help keep your pores clean, channels open, brain awake...but if I drink or eat spicy food every day (excess) it becomes quite uncomfortable.

    From a strict perspective, according to Peat's research, it seems like he suggests completely limiting or avoiding any irritants...I can't recall hearing him ever recommend them
     
  8. Dutchie

    Dutchie Member

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    Actually a Peat-inspired practitioner once said to me black pepper can better be avoided and only using white pepper instead,I just can't recall at the moment anymore what was the deal with black pepper...
    But in the end all natural foods got good&bad proponents,wouldn't a high metabolism be able to deal with it anyway....meaning you probably need to take care of your liver being able to detox properly.
     
  9. Gabriel

    Gabriel Member

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    From Peatarian e-mail exchanges:
    I dont think a bit of garlic or onions poses any problem. Black pepper in contrast is filled with heavy metals (especially aluminium) which is why I avoid it.
     
  10. Dutchie

    Dutchie Member

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    Oh rigth,that was it about black pepper! Imho white pepper has a more delicate taste anyway.

    Theyre talking about raw,but what about when cooked/sauteed/fried? As a kid i always loved French onion soup with the melted cheese toast on top!
    Is there a way to manipulate the intestinal flora again to be able to tolerate them?
     
  11. Swandattur

    Swandattur Member

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    Maybe just adding garlic or onion for flavor, but not actually eating it would be okay. You know, just use a whole clove or onion to flavor then pick it out.

    Birdie posted this about a year ago: viewtopic.php?f=17&t=789
     
  12. mandance

    mandance Member

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    I eat onions and garlic all the time with no real issues. But I sorta grew up eating stuff like that as I am half italian. Unless you have digestive issues, I dont think that stuff is really all that harmful. Italians have been eating tons of that stuff forever, and those are some of the healthiest most long lived people on the planet.
     
  13. Swandattur

    Swandattur Member

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    I think onions and garlic are fine if you are used to them and don't have digestive trouble. I used to be able to eat most anything without bad effect that I knew. Now, every food is a suspect!
     
  14. natedawggh

    natedawggh Member

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    Peat also said in an article that roots and tubers (ginger and garlic are roots) pose less problems because their defense mechanisms are for organisms in the dirt like nematodes, it's the above ground plants that are more problematic. Plus Ginger apparently is an effective anti serotonin agent, and that can be very helpful.
     
  15. lindsay

    lindsay Member

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    I love onions. And garlic. And pretty much any spicey food. Since following Peat's ideas, I've pretty much adopted a really bland diet and it's really really helped improve my digestion overall, which was horrible previously. Thyroid has also helped digestion. However, a week ago, I had indian food for dinner - hadn't eaten Indian food in awhile and it's one of my favorites. I had Lamb Saag (lamb with spinach gravy) and I must say I felt as though I was dying for the next day (I've had another similar experience with Indian food previously, in which I thought I had appendicitis). Long story short, I don't want anything with that much garlic or spice again for a long time! There was also onion and ginger, of course, but they don't bother me the same as garlic. And, if the food happened to be cooked in PUFA (really hoping the restaurant uses ghee), that would explain it, as I have very bad reactions to food cooked in PUFA since having my gallbladder removed.
    So, I thought I really missed spicey foods - and I still like them from time to time - but now I've determined that I should keep it bland until my stomach has recuperated a bit more. If you can tolerate them, go for it! Life needs a little spice. But if you cannot, maybe it's best to avoid them until things get better.
     
  16. SaltGirl

    SaltGirl Member

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    I don't know how it is where you live, but most places where I live tend to use rather cheap cooking oil(which is an unholy mixture of rapeseed oil and coconut oil) and in my experience it usually makes me feel like crap. One thai place here even proudly claims using 100% rapeseed oil, as if that was the best thing since sliced bread. A lot of places have gone on the PUFA bandwagon due to its "heart healthy" effects so when I am eating outside of my home I kinda expect places to be using bad oils.
     
  17. lindsay

    lindsay Member

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    I'm beginning to think it's a good idea to tell people at the restaurant I have an allergy to all vegetable oils and could they please use butter instead. I used to love eating out - now all I can think about is all the PUFA in the food. :(
     
  18. HDD

    HDD Member

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    I purchased some pho from a favorite Vietnamese restaurant this weekend. Traditionally it is made with a meat/bone broth. As I looked at the glistening broth,I couldn't help but wonder if that glistening was from a bottle of pufa oil. :(
     
  19. Swandattur

    Swandattur Member

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    On the spices, maybe just going a lot lighter would help. When they put in a huge amount of spice, it probably means extra starch and histamines from some of them. It would be like eating a starchy vegetable perhaps.
     
  20. pboy

    pboy Member

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    im sort of just poking fun...onions grilling sometimes smell pretty good...but I can't think of who or why would have originally eaten raw spices and been like...'mmm, lets start adding something that burns and stinks to our food!"...alas
     
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