Candida And Fruit/Sugar

TNT

Member
Joined
May 16, 2018
Messages
130
Do people have issues with sugar and candida? In particular, sugar from fruit? I was low-carb for many years, and I had major health issues, but I figured low-carb was helping me. But then last year, I did the unthinkable -- I went on a fruitarian diet. I didn't quite do 80/10/10, but more like 75/12/13, and I wasn't entirely vegan -- I used colostrum, which I need for my immunity. I felt amazing -- much better sleep, tons of energy, I was able to finally build muscle, etc. Who would have thought that fruit would do that? But I started losing my hair (which had been a problem even before fruitarian, but it got waaaay worse after I started eating fruit). Since my hair loss has gone up and down over the years, I figured this may not be due to fruitarian (it could just be its normal variability), but it was just getting worse and worse, so I figured I was probably having nutritional deficiencies, and I stopped the fruitarian diet after 8 months, but still continued to eat one fruit meal per day.

It's been 9 months now that I'm back to eating a non-fruitarian diet (with one fruit meal per day, so about 1/3 of my calories are from fruit), and the hair loss hasn't gotten better -- it's only continued getting worse. Suspecting candida as a major contributor to this, I've been doing candida treatments, and they seem to help in reducing my hair loss, but as soon as I stop treating, the hair loss increases again, which tells me that candida is a major issue for me in terms of the hair loss.

Here's what I'm wondering -- is fruit making it impossible for me to get my candida under control? I've tried stopping or cutting back on fruit a couple times since all this started, and I feel like ***t without it -- horrible sleep, no energy, etc. So my body is saying it wants fruit, but is it making me have out-of-control candida, or is the candida being stubborn for some other reason? Nowdays, low-carb is all the rage, and fruit/sugar is made out to be a bad guy, esp. for candida. But I'm not sure I buy that.

Anyone have experience with fruit and candida and whether I'm screwing myself up by eating fruit (and therefore sugar from fruit)?

Please note:

1) I am not looking for (or welcoming of) suggestions about hair loss in general. I guarantee you that whatever it is you want to suggest, I've already been down that road. In this thread, I am only looking for a discussion about fruit and candida (as it relates to hair loss).

2) I am not looking for (or welcoming of) suggestions for how to treat candida. I am only looking for a discussion about fruit and candida.
 

Dave Clark

Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
1,271
For me, low carb and sugar didn't solve any candida issues. What helped me is doing ozone treatments in the 40 to 50 gamma range, which is the range that starts to kill fungus, etc. I had done 30 gamma for months but nothing changed, read an article on ozone usage and gamma settings and found out I needed to up the strength. That worked. You can also try things that prevent the candida from morphing from the yeast to the fungal form, which makes it easier to control, like gymena sylvestra (an ayervedic herb) which had shown to work in a Kansas university study. I am sure there are others. Trial and era, try everything, but do your homework so that you don't end up making your health worse in an attempt to kill candida.
 

jet9

Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2018
Messages
442
For me, low carb and sugar didn't solve any candida issues. What helped me is doing ozone treatments in the 40 to 50 gamma range, which is the range that starts to kill fungus, etc. I had done 30 gamma for months but nothing changed, read an article on ozone usage and gamma settings and found out I needed to up the strength. That worked. You can also try things that prevent the candida from morphing from the yeast to the fungal form, which makes it easier to control, like gymena sylvestra (an ayervedic herb) which had shown to work in a Kansas university study. I am sure there are others. Trial and era, try everything, but do your homework so that you don't end up making your health worse in an attempt to kill candida.
Never heard of ozone treatments, could you tell more? Where to buy, cost, etc.
 

Dave Clark

Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
1,271
Well, there is a lot to tell, but you can start by doing searches on ozone therapy, there is tons of information. For me, Promolife is the best bet for purchasing ozone equipment, etc., plus they are very helpful if you call them. Dr. Robert Rowen is one of the premier ozone doctors, search his site for info and testimonials. In a nutshell, ozone is O3 which can kill microbes like fungus, yet stimulates the healthy cells to produce internal antioxidants like glutathione, SOD, etc. Cost, a good medical ozone generator will cost about 1k, plus some accessories. A valuable home tool for battling microbes and oxygenating your system.
 

zewe

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2018
Messages
265
Candida will make you crave sugar. Below some low sugar fruits. I think RP doesn't like fruits with seeds....but make up your own mind.

Here are 10 Low Sugar Fruits:

Strawberries-
Grams of Fructose: 1.9 grams for 1/2 cup, Net Carbs: 3 grams for 1/2 cup



Raspberries-
Grams of Fructose: 1.5 grams for 1/2 cup, Net Carbs: 4 grams for 1/2 cup



Blackberries-
Grams of Fructose: 1.7 grams for 1/2 cup, Net Carbs: 5 grams for 1/2 cup



Cranberries-
Grams of Fructose: .35 grams for 1/2 cup, Net Carbs: 3.5 grams for 1/2 cup



Cantaloupe-
Grams of Fructose: 2.8 grams for 1/2 cup, Net Carbs: 5 grams for 1/2 cup



Honey Dew Melon
Grams of Fructose: 6.7 grams for 1/2 cup, Net Carbs: 7 grams for 1/2 cup



Plums
Grams of Fructose: 3 grams for 1 plum, Net Carbs: 7.5 grams for 1 plum



Peaches
Grams of Fructose: 5 grams for 1 peach, Net Carbs: 6 grams for 1 peach



Blueberries
Grams of Fructose: 3.5 grams for 1/2 cup, Net Carbs: 8 grams 1/2 cup



Green Apples
Grams of Fructose: 3.5 grams for 1/2 apple, Net Carbs: 8 grams for 1/2 apple



You could add kiwis and rhubarb too.
 

Ella

Member
Joined
Oct 6, 2012
Messages
646
@Dave Clark, ozone therapy has been around for 150 years and I agree is an awesome therapy against infectious agents and activating the immune system. You do need to be careful on how to administer, though.

How did you use; ears, rectally or other?
 

Travis

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2016
Messages
3,189
Do people have issues with sugar and candida? In particular, sugar from fruit? I was low-carb for many years, and I had major health issues, but I figured low-carb was helping me. But then last year, I did the unthinkable -- I went on a fruitarian diet. I didn't quite do 80/10/10, but more like 75/12/13, and I wasn't entirely vegan -- I used colostrum, which I need for my immunity. I felt amazing -- much better sleep, tons of energy, I was able to finally build muscle, etc. Who would have thought that fruit would do that? But I started losing my hair (which had been a problem even before fruitarian, but it got waaaay worse after I started eating fruit). Since my hair loss has gone up and down over the years, I figured this may not be due to fruitarian (it could just be its normal variability), but it was just getting worse and worse, so I figured I was probably having nutritional deficiencies, and I stopped the fruitarian diet after 8 months, but still continued to eat one fruit meal per day.

It's been 9 months now that I'm back to eating a non-fruitarian diet (with one fruit meal per day, so about 1/3 of my calories are from fruit), and the hair loss hasn't gotten better -- it's only continued getting worse. Suspecting candida as a major contributor to this, I've been doing candida treatments, and they seem to help in reducing my hair loss, but as soon as I stop treating, the hair loss increases again, which tells me that candida is a major issue for me in terms of the hair loss.

Here's what I'm wondering -- is fruit making it impossible for me to get my candida under control? I've tried stopping or cutting back on fruit a couple times since all this started, and I feel like ***t without it -- horrible sleep, no energy, etc. So my body is saying it wants fruit, but is it making me have out-of-control candida, or is the candida being stubborn for some other reason? Nowdays, low-carb is all the rage, and fruit/sugar is made out to be a bad guy, esp. for candida. But I'm not sure I buy that.

Anyone have experience with fruit and candida and whether I'm screwing myself up by eating fruit (and therefore sugar from fruit)?

Please note:

1) I am not looking for (or welcoming of) suggestions about hair loss in general. I guarantee you that whatever it is you want to suggest, I've already been down that road. In this thread, I am only looking for a discussion about fruit and candida (as it relates to hair loss).

2) I am not looking for (or welcoming of) suggestions for how to treat candida. I am only looking for a discussion about fruit and candida.

Sucrose is a growth factor for C. albicans, yet each of its monosaccharides have disparate potency: Fructose can be shown to stimulate yeast growth, yet glucose significantly more so. lactose has very little effect and xylitol none at all. The Candida cell wall is strengthened by chitin, a linear cellulose-like polysaccharide having resistant β-links. Chitin is composed of repeating units of N-acetylglucosamine, a monosaccharide even more powerful than glucose at inducing growth. Acetylglucosamine has been shown to induce a veritable Candida bloom, both in vitro and in vivo, and were glucose considered a 'growth factor' this wouldn't be anything less than a 'growth agent.' In fact, it's actually been termed a 'hormone' by some researchers due to Candida having receptors for such, in which it uses to sense and respond-to it's N-acetylglucosamine status.

The enzyme used by C. albicans to catalyze the synthesis of N-acetylglucosamine relies on two substrates: glucose and glutamine. Glutamine acts like a growth factor, working in synergy with glucose to exponentially-increase chitin synthesis rates. The combination of both glucose and glutamine would be nearly synonymous with the elongation of hyphae, capable of invasively probing it's way through the interstices found between mammalian cells. Wheat proteins are particularly high in glutamine, and since starch is 100% glucose I'd nominate that as the #1 worst food. If I had to rate foods according to apparent Candida-enhancing ability, wheat would define the scale's upper limit.

Tomatoes are remarkably high in free glutamine, having more than enough to warrant their avoidance. Plants store excess nitrogen either as asparagine or glutamine, used for future seed germination as an accessible and convenient store of nitrogen. The majority of foods derive from asparagine-storing plants, yet there are a few glutamine-storing genera to avoid. Although corn, legumes, and many tree nuts have inconsequential glutamine concentrations, they all have an extremely high-glucose/fructose ratio (undefined at certain limits of detection).

Fruits would then appear better than starchy seeds, yet raw cheese would define that safety scale. Lactose is a safer monosaccharide in this respect, and unheated milk ought to still have active lactoperoxidase. When combined with iodide ions (I⁻) also found in milk, lactoperoxidase produces the powerful hypoiodite ion (IO⁻). The lactoperoxidase enzymatic system is what best accounts for the antibacterial properties of raw milk, and hypoiodite (IO⁻) is even more effective against yeast. Neutrophils have a similar enzyme that does the same, which is surely the reason why oral potassium iodide has been shown effective against Candida.

Nuts have neither glucose nor glutamine and thus could be assumed safe, yet only superficially: Most tree nuts have substantial concentrations of omega−6 fatty acids. Mammals lack the ability to synthesize this class of lipid, yet both yeast and helminths do this. Not only can they synthesize this class of fatty acid, yeast will produce and release them in the body. Linoleic (18∶2ω−6), γ-linolenic (18∶3ω−6), and arachidonic acids (20∶4ω−6) and all found in yeast culture fluid and in humans, the latter is the precursor for leukotriene B₄. This arachidonic acid product had been discovered due to it's remarkable ability to attract neutrophils, coincidentally the very cell type most-effective against yeast. Yet: leukotrienes are released by mammalian immune cells to attract eachother, and by eating it's precursor lipid—i.e. linoleic acid (18∶2ω−6)—leukotriene B₄ is produced. Enhanced circulating levels of leukotriene B₄ could dilute the signal emitted by yeast cells, causing enough background noise to white out yeast cell location. A Candida albicans cell inside an omega−6-deficient mammal would be a veritable beacon for neutrophils, the most potent anti-candidal immune cell.

The safety of fruits varies in accordance with its fructose/glucose ratio and its general concentration. Fruit has a ratio of 50∶50, on average, yet can be found with anything from 40∶60 up to 70∶30 (e.g. a Fiji apple). The only exception I know of is the banana, the one common fruit being practically all glucose. Glutamine excludes tomatoes and glucose the banana, and when eaten together they would provide the two N-acetylglucosamine precursors—or chitin monomers—in high amounts. Wheat would as well, yet also has omega−6 fatty acids.
 

Elephanto

Member
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
820
what about glutamine in the absence of high blood glucose levels?

Glutamine doesn't seem to be a relevant positive factor to Candida growth in reality, here's why.

Relationship between absolute and relative ratios of glutamate, glutamine and GABA and severity of autism spectrum disorder. - PubMed - NCBI
significantly lower levels of plasma glutamine and glutamate/GABA ratios compared to controls.

New evidences on the altered gut microbiota in autism spectrum disorders
the relative abundance of the fungal genus Candida was more than double in the autistic than neurotypical subjects


Lack of glutamine (or the enzyme that converts glutamate into glutamine) is probably a factor in Candida growth since an healthy gut, not affected by permeability, probably doesn't allow the overgrowth of Candida.
 

Elephanto

Member
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
820
Thank you, @Elephanto . So why does RP recommend fruit juice?

Because nobody has absolute knowledge. Because this forum's motto is "Perceive, think, act", not "Blindly follow dogmas". We must build upon the foundation of pioneers, always question perceived truths to get closer to the actual truth. This is how we got to find Peat in the first place. To me, the most solid part of his foundation is high carbs, low fat (and close to no pufa), the restriction of deleterious amino acids, importance of CO2, high metabolism and the avoidance of stress.
 

tara

Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2014
Messages
10,357
My personal experience with something I think was candida was that eating a low sugar (but highish starch) diet did not coincide with improvement. Eating more fruit and more sugar did.
Lots of other things changed too, so I'm not assuming that was causal. Could have been that I started eating more sugar at the same time that I radically reduced PUFA for instance.
 

Travis

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2016
Messages
3,189
Despite the title, this is not an experimental article like I'd imagined. This article had been ostensibly constructed primarily out of extrapolations gained from high fat + high fructose rat feeding studies, and also has silly cartoon images [Fig. 6].

Fructose is converted into saturated fatty acids in the liver where glucose is preferentially stored as glycogen. Glycogen adsorbs H₂O and takes-up far more space than an isocaloric amount of triglycerides, and is a polysaccharide stored in the extracellular space. Does anyone know why 'starch eaters' generally have that plumped-up look? Is that fat?. . or is that glycogen?

Or is it from chronically high levels of insulin?. . that pancreatic hormone only released by glucose, not fructose.
 
Last edited:

Elephanto

Member
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
820
Despite the title, this is not an experimental article like I'd imagined. This article had been ostensibly constructed primarily out of extrapolations gained from high fat + high fructose rat feeding studies, and also has silly cartoon images [Fig. 6].

Fructose is converted into free saturated fatty acids in the liver where glucose is preferentially stored as glycogen. Glycogen adsorbs H₂O and takes-up far more space than an isocaloric amount of triglycerides, a polysaccharide stored in the extracellular space. Does anyone know why 'starch eaters' generally have that plumped-up look? Is that fat?. . or is that glycogen?

By starch eaters, you refer to gluten eaters. Which causes intestinal permeability and sticks to the gut like literal glue decaying there. With a youtube search of fruitarian vlogs you'll find plenty of people with unhealthy looks though.

There are several studies on fructose's mechanism of affecting gut permeability, external to fat intake. You could make a pubmed search. Another one :
Fructokinase, Fructans, Intestinal Permeability, and Metabolic Syndrome: An Equine Connection?
 

TNT

Member
Thread starter
Joined
May 16, 2018
Messages
130
@Elephanto , so if fruit causes NAFLD and other problems, and he's recommending high carb (and avoiding starch), then how are we supposed to get our carbs?
 

Elephanto

Member
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
820
@Elephanto , so if fruit causes NAFLD and other problems, and he's recommending high carb (and avoiding starch), then how are we supposed to get our carbs?

He sees starch as inferior, not something to be avoided at all cost. From my research and experience, I think that properly washed/drained white basmati rice mixed with antibacterial substances like olive/coconut oil and herbs/spices like ginger, salt, etc is the healthiest source of carbs.

@Travis
About your point on insulin, have you ever thought about the fact that those people you refer to also eat a high fat diet which causes insulin resistance, and a high protein diet whose amino acids directly trigger insulin. Both of those macros in quantities never seen in history when diabetes was essentially inexistent and an almost exclusively starchy diet was the norm. Still is in many healthy countries/communities that eat low fat low protein low (or 0) sugar like the blue zones.
 

Travis

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2016
Messages
3,189
About your point on insulin, have you ever thought about the fact that those people you refer to also eat a high fat diet which causes insulin resistance,
I was considering the differential physical properties between polysaccharide and lipid, and which one accounts for more physical volume in 'starch eaters' and people in general. Hyaluronic acid is one other extracellular polysaccharide, and one that is injected clinically and specifically for its plumping effect volumetric enhancement.
and a high protein diet whose amino acids directly trigger insulin.
Which amino acids do this? Are these the Krebs Cycle ones?
Both of those macros in quantities never seen in history when diabetes was essentially inexistent and an almost exclusively starchy diet was the norm.
I would certainly agree that low intakes of ω−6 fatty acids would better maintain transmembrane glucose flux and thus decrease the volume of stored glycogen. Glycogen storage isn't of course exclusively pathological, and native and less-refined starches are no doubt absorbed more slowly (Volkheimer, 1974).
 

TNT

Member
Thread starter
Joined
May 16, 2018
Messages
130
Would black seed oil (which is supposed to be very antifungal) be as bad as the rest of the Omega-6-containing oils?
 
Similar threads
Thread starter Title Forum Replies Date
T Fruit/Sugar And Candida Beverages, Fruits, Sugars 3
T Candida And Fruit/Sugar Hair & Nails 5
UG Krishnamurti "When candida ends up in your bloodstream it's over!" haidut 33
Mauritio Caprylic acid effective against Candida albicans , H. Pylori and Cytomegalovirus, more effective than diflucan Science 14
Mauritio Caprylic acid and Thymol very effective against Candida albicans Science 21
S Treatment For Fungus/yeast/candida? Help Plz Ask For Help or Advice 46
C Candida Glabrata Ask For Help or Advice 1
lyfe Candida Self Diagnosis? Digestion 25
Philomath Repurposed Anthelminthic Treats Candida And Uncouples Mitochondria Scientific Studies 0
jzeno Candida Auris: Mysterious Infection Labelled ‘serious Threat’ Spreading Over The Globe Miscellaneous Health Discussions 13
D Fighting Candida, Food Sensitivities / Leaky Gut, Brain Fog, Ocular Migraines, Acetaldehyde Supplements, Pharmaceutical Drugs 18
ecstatichamster Lufeneron May Fix Candida Infections - Any Experience With It? Pharmaceutical Drugs 1
B White Tongue, Candida, Dandruff, Hair Loss ? Ask For Help or Advice 11
Hans Monolaurin Effective Against Candida (equal To Nysatin) Scientific Studies 9
L Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) Inhibits The Germination Of Candida Albicans Scientific Studies 2
burtlancast Acetaldehyde As A Cause For Chronic Migraines In Candida Patients Testimonials 79
michael94 Candida Overgrowth As A Response To Toxicity Crisis Articles & Scientific Studies 9
haidut Candida Overgrowth Is A Major Factor In (alcoholic) Liver Damage / Cirrhosis Scientific Studies 33
H Female Weight Loss, Candida, Thyroid And Low Testosterone Weight 1
B Candida - Affecting Nose And Sinus Eyes, Ears, Nose and Headaches/Migraines 13
F Candida And SIBO Advice Needed Digestion 3
crX Candida Test While Taking Antibiotics Blood Work, Labs 7
L Candida, Milk And Other Issues Ask For Help or Advice 1
R Sputum Candida Culture Came Back Positive - Doctor Says It's Nothing To Worry About? Blood Work, Labs 4
Strongbad Candida Overgrowth. What To Do Now? Diet 73
haidut Niacinamide Is A Potent Antifungal Effective Against Candida Scientific Studies 53
N Finasteride Activity Against Candida Albicans Scientific Studies 3
haidut Aspirin As An Antifungal Drug, Even Against Candida Scientific Studies 34
haidut Methylene blue (MB) for oral Candida (Candidiasis) Scientific Studies 5
N Candida Viruses, Parasites, Fungus, Vaccines 150
Lianda Gross (sorry!): Toenail Fungus & Candida Ask For Help or Advice 15
I Thrush and system candida help Oral Health 16
W oral thrush(candida) and weightloss? Oral Health 2
T SIBO and Candida Digestion 25
L Dealing With Candida And Digestive Problems Digestion 82
D Candida Treatment When Already Starved It Digestion, Gut Flora 21
hoppimike Quick And Easy Peat-friendly Candida Supps? Viruses, Parasites, Fungus, Vaccines 14
Korven Do you feel best on A) "normal" 3x meals of meat/starch/veggies or B) "Peat style" no starch milk/meat/fruit diet? Diet, Recipes 46
Michael Mohn Does serotonin in fruit raise serotonin blood levels? Cortisol, Serotonin, Histamine 5
G Carbs—sugar, starch and fruit causing pimples Diet, Recipes 8
Atma 81 Year Old Woman Ate Fruit and Milk Diet for 27 Years Milk 58
Ben Stone Black Sapote ("Chocolate Pudding Fruit") > feedback on this most interesting Mexican fruit? Fruits & Fruit Juice 0
V Meat with fruit Diet 4
cupofcoffee Cordyceps militaris Fruit Body Extract increases testosterone and DHT secretion Scientific Studies 47
Hgreen56 Pasta Scores Lower Insulin Index Than Fruit Diet 13
ursidae Effects Of Fruit On Your Mental State Fruits 36
J Nervous/Anxious Energy After Eating Fruit - Blood Sugar Issues? Blood Sugar 9
Recoen Hypoglycemia With Fruit Blood Sugar 88
Brundle Would The Optimal Peat Diet Be Mostly Raw Animal Products And Fruit? Diet 38
Hans Fruit Juice And Triglycerides Articles & Scientific Studies 14

Similar threads

Top