Can Glucagon Be The "baddie" Rather Than Cortisol In Type 2 Diabetes?

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Nov 21, 2015
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A lot of what Ray talks about is how to prevent chronically elevated stress hormones, the "stress metabolism".

But at least as far as diabetes is concerned, perhaps glucagon is the criminal here?

In this study, they induce diabetes through a routine destruction of beta cells often done in these situations with lab rats, and they found that suppressing glucagon allowed the rats to tolerate glucose Even without any increase in insulin, which was impossible because their beta cells were destroyed.

Perhaps, the idea frequently supplementing with sugar may assist in controlling glucagon levels, and may actually be more important than suppressing cortisol.

Glucagon as a Critical Factor in the Pathology of Diabetes

The surprise in the data of Lee et al. (1) comes not from the improvement in glycemia caused by a lack of glucagon action, but from the complete normalization of glucose tolerance that occurred. Transition from the fasted to fed state involves a reduction in glucose production by the liver and an increase in glucose disposal by insulin sensitive tissues (skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue). Studies in the human and canine have indicated that following an oral glucose load of moderate size (∼1 g/kg BW), the liver and skeletal muscle are each responsible for approximately a third of glucose disposal, with noninsulin dependant tissues accounting for the remainder (14). In nondiabetic individuals, the changes in muscle and liver glucose metabolism are thought to be chiefly mediated by insulin (14). The fact that oral glucose tolerance was normal in the STZ treated Gcgr−/− mice of Lee et al. (1), despite no rise in insulin, suggests that in a net sense glucose uptake by liver and muscle was normal. Whether both tissues took up glucose normally, or one compensated for a defect in the other, is not clear. Nevertheless, this raises the question as to what is driving glucose disposal if not insulin.
 

drk

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Oct 30, 2015
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Just found out about this as well. Absolutley fascinating that glucagon surpression can reverse glycemia even in type 1 diabetic anials.
Wonder what are some ways to surpress Glucagon.
 

Tarmander

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Apr 30, 2015
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I have someone close to me which went on one of those newer GLP-1 receptor agonists that raise cAMP and cause the body to release less glucagon. Victoza I believe.

She experienced a lot of nausea, had no appetite, ate very little, and lost weight very rapidly. It was interesting watching. She was a bit overweight, not a ton, and a type 1 diabetic. She had to take much less insulin, which is usually the case when you fast.

I dunno, I am not sure how much it helped. It seemed to just cause her to be unable to keep food down.
 

homyak

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Sep 8, 2019
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Zinc is apparently another potent glucagon inhibitor.

Glucagon.com

"Insulin and zinc are potent inhibitors of glucagon secretion from rat α cells, perhaps through modulation of KATP channel activity, whereas the inhibitory effect of GLP-1 on α-cells may be indirect, as outlined in studies of rat α cells in vitro β-Cell Secretory Products Activate a-Cell ATP-Dependent Potassium Channels to Inhibit Glucagon Release. Diabetes. 2005 Jun;54(6):1808-15, and in experiments with mouse α- β-Cell Pdx1 Expression Is Essential for the Glucoregulatory, Proliferative, and Cytoprotective Actions of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1. Diabetes 2005 54: 482-491."

 
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Capt Nirvana

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Mar 25, 2018
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So eat more sugar?
It worked for William Budd, M.D. Whatever amount of sugar went out in the urine, he replaced exactly. In at least one case he used 12 ounces of refined sugar combined with 4 ounces of honey per day to keep his patient from dying.
 
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