Calcium Speeds Up Prostate Cancer (but Fructose Slows It Down)

Joined
Nov 21, 2015
Messages
9,059
An interesting study
https://www.researchgate.net/profil...ate_cancer/links/02e7e526eb8b0d1f50000000.pdf

Laboratory and clinical data indicate an antitumor effect of 1,25(OH)2 vitamin I) 11.25i()1h ,l)i on prostate cancer.

High calcium intake suppresses formation of l,2>iOlli.l) from 25(OH)D, thereby decreasing the 1.25(0111.1) level.

Ingestion of fructose reduces plasma phosphate transiently, and hypophosphatemia stimulates 1,25(OH)2D production.

We thus conducted a prospective study among 47,781 men of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study free of cancer in 19X6 to examine whether calcium and fructose intake influenced risk of prostate cancer.

Between 1986 and 1994, 1369 non-stage Al and 423 advanced (extraprostatic) cases of prostate cancer were diagnosed.

Higher consumption of calcium was related to advanced prostate cancer |multivariate relative risk (RR), 2.97; 95% confidence interval (CD, 1.61-5.50 for intakes s=2000 rng/day versus <500 mg/day; P, trend, 0.002] and metastatic prostate cancer (RR, 4.57; CI, 1.88-11.1; P, trend, <0.001).

Calcium from food sources and from supplements independently increased risk.

High fructose intake was related to a lower risk of advanced prostate cancer (multivariate RR, 0.51; CI, 0.33-0.80, for intakes >70 versus S40 g/day; P, trend, 0.007).

Fruit intake was inversely associated with risk of advanced prostate cancer (RR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43-0.93; for >5 versus SI serving per day), and this association was accounted for by fructose intake.

Non-fruit sources of fructose similarly predicted lower risk of advanced prostate cancer.

A moderate positive association between energy-adjusted fat intake and advanced prostate cancer was attenuated and no longer statistically significant when controlled for calcium and fructose.

Our findings provide indirect evidence for a protective influence of high 1,25(OH)2D levels on prostate cancer and support increased fruit consumption and avoidance of high calcium intake to reduce the risk of advanced prostate cancer.
 

ecstatichamster

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btw, several studies say the same thing, independently about calcium and prostate cancer.

I was thinking, low K2 levels are probably to blame but that is only speculation. Excess calcium without enough K2 can cause calcification of organs.
 

paymanz

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Nice,

And 1,25oh itself increases serum calcium,so maybe problem is not the calcium,but its effect on 1,25 levels.
 

ecstatichamster

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The fructose angle is interesting. It's hard to find objective studies about fructose.
 

ecstatichamster

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Ray responded to my question:

Animal studies are usually better for understanding the effects of specific nutrients. In humans, there’s some association of decreased bowel cancer, increased prostate cancer and increased dietary calcium, but the diet studies have been very ambiguous.

Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Dec;16(12):2623-30.


Br J Nutr. 2007 Apr;97(4):611-6.

Comment in:

Br J Nutr. 2007 Apr;97(4):596-7.

Calcium intake and vitamin D metabolism and action, in healthy conditions and in

prostate cancer.

Bonjour JP, Chevalley T, Fardellone P.

Division of Bone Diseases (World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for

Osteoporosis Prevention), Department of Rehabilitation and Geriatrics, University

Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 14, Switzerland.

jean-philippe.bonjour@medecine.unige.ch

An association between Ca intake and the risk of prostate cancer has been

reported in some but not all epidemiological studies. Assuming that a

pathophysiological relationship would underlie this association, a favoured

hypothesis proposes that relatively high Ca consumption could promote prostate

cancer by reducing the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D;

calcitriol), the hormonal form of vitamin D. The present review analyses the

plausibility of this hypothesis by considering the quantitative relationships

linking Ca intake to 1,25(OH)2D production and action in healthy conditions and

in prostate cancer. Changes in the plasma level of 1,25(OH)2D in response to Ca

intake are of very small magnitude as compared with the variations required to

influence the proliferation and differentiation of prostate cancer cells. In most

studies, 1,25(OH)2D plasma level was not found to be reduced in patients with

prostate cancer. The possibility that the level of 1,25(OH)2D in prostate cells

is decreased with a high-Ca diet has not been documented. Furthermore, a recent

randomised placebo-controlled trial did not indicate that Ca supplementation

increases the relative risk of prostate cancer in men. In conclusion, the

existence of a pathophysiological link between relatively high Ca intake and

consequent low production and circulation level of 1,25(OH)2D that might promote

the development of prostate cancer in men remains so far an hypothesis, the

plausibility of which is not supported by the analysis of available clinical

data.


Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Dec 1;166(11):1270-9.

Calcium, dairy foods, and risk of incident and fatal prostate cancer: the

NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

Park Y, Mitrou PN, Kipnis V, Hollenbeck A, Schatzkin A, Leitzmann MF.

Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics,

National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20852, USA. parkyik@mail.nih.gov

Calcium and dairy foods in relation to prostate cancer were examined in the

National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP (formerly known as the American

Association of Retired Persons) Diet and Health Study (1995/1996-2001). Diet was

assessed with a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Multivariate relative

risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox regression. During up to

6 years of follow-up (n = 293,888), the authors identified 10,180 total prostate

cancer cases (8,754 nonadvanced, 1,426 advanced, and 178 fatal cases). Total and

supplemental calcium were unrelated to total and nonadvanced prostate cancer.

However, a statistically nonsignificant positive association with total calcium

was observed for advanced (> or = 2,000 vs. 500-<750 mg/day: relative risk (RR) =

1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.91, 1.71; p(trend) = 0.06) and fatal (> or

= 1,000 vs. 500-<750 mg/day: RR = 1.39, 95% CI: 0.92, 2.09; p(trend) = 0.10)

prostate cancer. Skim milk, but not other dairy foods, was associated with

increased risk of advanced prostate cancer (> or = 2 vs. zero servings/day: RR =

1.23, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.54; p(trend) = 0.01). In contrast, calcium from nondairy

foods was associated with lower risk of nonadvanced prostate cancer (> or = 600

vs. < 250 mg/day: RR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.68, 0.99; p(trend) = 0.04). Although the

authors cannot definitively rule out a weak association for aggressive prostate

cancer, their findings do not provide strong support for the hypothesis that

calcium and dairy foods increase prostate cancer risk.


Cancer Causes Control. 2007 Feb;18(1):41-50.

Meat and dairy consumption and subsequent risk of prostate cancer in a US cohort

study.

Rohrmann S, Platz EA, Kavanaugh CJ, Thuita L, Hoffman SC, Helzlsouer KJ.

Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615

N. Wolfe St., Rm. E 6138, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association of meat and dairy food consumption with

subsequent risk of prostate cancer. METHODS: In 1989, 3,892 men 35+ years old,

who participated in CLUE II study of Washington County, MD, completed an

abbreviated Block food frequency questionnaire. Intake of meat and dairy related

foods was calculated using consumption frequency and portion size. Incident

prostate cancer cases (n = 199) were ascertained through October 2004. Cox

proportional hazards regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) of total

and advanced (SEER states three and four; n = 54) prostate cancer and 95%

confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for age, BMI at age 21, and intake of energy,

saturated fat, and tomato products. RESULTS: Intakes of total mean (HR = 0.90,

95% CI 0.60-1.33, comparing highest to lowest tertile) and red meat (HR = 0.87,

95% CI 0.59-1.32) were not statistically significantly associated with prostate

cancer. However, processed meat consumption was associated with a

non-statistically significant higher risk of total (5+ vs. < or =1 servings/week:

HR = 2.24; 95% CI 0.90-5.59) prostate cancer. There was no association across

tertiles of dairy or calcium with total prostate cancer, although compared tp <

or =1 servings/week consumption of 5+ servings/week of dairy foods was associated

with an increased risk of prostate cancer (HR = 1.65, 98% CI 1.02-2.66).

CONCLUSION: Overall, consumption of processed meat, but not total meat or red

meat, was associated with a possible increased risk of total prostate cancer in

this prospective study. Higher intake of dairy foods but not calcium was

positively associated with prostate cancer. Further investigation into the

mechanisms by which processed meat and dairy consumption might increase the risk

of prostate cancer is suggested.


J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007 Mar;103(3-5):747-51.

Dietary calcium does not affect prostate tumor progression in LPB-Tag transgenic

mice.

Mordan-McCombs S, Brown T, Zinser G, Welsh J, Tenniswood M.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 222 Galvin Life

Sciences Building, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA.

High dietary calcium has been shown in epidemiological studies to be a risk

factor for prostate cancer, and it has been postulated that this effect is

secondary to calcium induced modulation of the vitamin D axis. In this study, we

used LPB-Tag transgenic mice on the CD1 background to examine the impact of

dietary calcium on prostate tumor progression. CD1-LPB-Tag mice predictably

develop autochthonous, hormone-responsive prostate tumors by 3 months of age. Age

matched transgenic and non-transgenic littermates were weaned onto high (2%) or

low (0.2%) calcium diets and mice were sacrificed at 5, 7, and 9 weeks of age.

The entire urogenital complex was excised, weighed, and processed for histology.

There was no significant effect of dietary calcium on tumor weight or on the time

course of tumor progression, as monitored using a modified Gleason grade (MGS).

Serum calcium was maintained in the normal range in mice on the low and high

calcium diet throughout the study. Circulating 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) was elevated by

low dietary calcium in 5-week-old mice, but not in older animals. In summary,

neither development nor progression of prostate tumors in LPB-Tag mice was

accelerated by high dietary calcium.


Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Dec 1;166(11):1270-9.

Calcium, dairy foods, and risk of incident and fatal prostate cancer: the

NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

Park Y, Mitrou PN, Kipnis V, Hollenbeck A, Schatzkin A, Leitzmann MF.

Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics,

National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20852, USA. parkyik@mail.nih.gov

Calcium and dairy foods in relation to prostate cancer were examined in the

National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP (formerly known as the American

Association of Retired Persons) Diet and Health Study (1995/1996-2001). Diet was

assessed with a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Multivariate relative

risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox regression. During up to

6 years of follow-up (n = 293,888), the authors identified 10,180 total prostate

cancer cases (8,754 nonadvanced, 1,426 advanced, and 178 fatal cases). Total and

supplemental calcium were unrelated to total and nonadvanced prostate cancer.

However, a statistically nonsignificant positive association with total calcium

was observed for advanced (> or = 2,000 vs. 500-<750 mg/day: relative risk (RR) =

1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.91, 1.71; p(trend) = 0.06) and fatal (> or

= 1,000 vs. 500-<750 mg/day: RR = 1.39, 95% CI: 0.92, 2.09; p(trend) = 0.10)

prostate cancer. Skim milk, but not other dairy foods, was associated with

increased risk of advanced prostate cancer (> or = 2 vs. zero servings/day: RR =

1.23, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.54; p(trend) = 0.01). In contrast, calcium from nondairy

foods was associated with lower risk of nonadvanced prostate cancer (> or = 600

vs. < 250 mg/day: RR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.68, 0.99; p(trend) = 0.04). Although the

authors cannot definitively rule out a weak association for aggressive prostate

cancer, their findings do not provide strong support for the hypothesis that

calcium and dairy foods increase prostate cancer risk.


Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Dec;16(12):2623-30.

Dairy products, calcium intake, and risk of prostate cancer in the prostate,

lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial.

Ahn J, Albanes D, Peters U, Schatzkin A, Lim U, Freedman M, Chatterjee N,

Andriole GL, Leitzmann MF, Hayes RB; Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian

Trial Project Team.

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH,

6120 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Ahnj@mail.nih.gov

Higher intakes of calcium and dairy products, a major source of dietary calcium,

are reported to increase the risk of prostate cancer, potentially due to

reductions in circulating vitamin D with increasing calcium intake. We

prospectively examined the association of dairy product and calcium intake with

prostate cancer risk in 29,509 men, including 1,910 cases, in the Prostate, Lung,

Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. We also evaluated the relation of

calcium intake with serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] and

1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D], in a Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and

Ovarian Trial substudy (n = 275). Dietary intake was assessed using a food

frequency questionnaire. Baseline serum 1,25(OH)(2)D was determined by RIA.

Greater intake of dairy products, particularly low-fat dairy products, was weakly

associated with increased risk of prostate cancer [relative risk (RR), 1.12; 95%

confidence intervals (CI), 0.97-1.30; P trend = 0.06 for >2.75 versus < or = 0.98

servings of total dairy/day; 1.23 (1.07-1.41) for low-fat dairy]. Greater dietary

calcium intake was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer (RR, 1.34;

95% CI, 0.93-1.94; P trend = 0.02 for >2,000 versus <1,000 mg/day), but greater

supplementary calcium intake was not associated with the risk. Associations of

dairy product and dietary calcium intake were evident for nonaggressive disease

(RR, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.99-1.46; P trend = 0.01 for dairy products; 1.64, 1.04-2.57;

P trend = 0.002 for dietary calcium), but not aggressive disease (RR, 1.02; 95%

CI, 0.81-1.28 for dairy products; 0.94, 0.49-1.80 for dietary calcium). Calcium

intake was not associated with serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D and 1,25(OH)(2)D

concentration. In this large prospective study in a prostate cancer screening

trial, greater dietary intake of calcium and dairy products, particularly low-fat

types, may be modestly associated with increased risks for nonaggressive prostate

cancer, but was unrelated to aggressive disease. Furthermore, we found no

relationship between calcium intake and circulating vitamin D.

Clinical Trial


Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Dec;86(6):1722-9.

Childhood dairy intake and adult cancer risk: 65-y follow-up of the Boyd Orr

cohort.

van der Pols JC, Bain C, Gunnell D, Smith GD, Frobisher C, Martin RM.

Longitudinal Studies Unit, Division of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, School

of Population Health, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

j.vanderpols@uq.edu.au

BACKGROUND: Dairy consumption affects biological pathways associated with

carcinogenesis. Evidence for a link between cancer risk and dairy consumption in

adulthood is increasing, but associations with childhood dairy consumption have

not been studied adequately. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether dairy consumption

in childhood is associated with cancer incidence and mortality in adulthood.

DESIGN: From 1937 through 1939, some 4,999 children living in England and

Scotland participated in a study of family food consumption, assessed from 7-d

household food inventories. The National Health Service central register was used

to ascertain cancer registrations and deaths between 1948 and 2005 in the 4,383

traced cohort members. Per capita household intake estimates for dairy products

and calcium were used as proxy for individual intake. RESULTS: During the

follow-up period, 770 cancer registrations or cancer deaths occurred. High

childhood total dairy intake was associated with a near-tripling in the odds of

colorectal cancer [multivariate odds ratio: 2.90 (95% CI: 1.26, 6.65); 2-sided P

for trend = 0.005] compared with low intake, independent of meat, fruit, and

vegetable intakes and socioeconomic indicators. Milk intake showed a similar

association with colorectal cancer risk. High milk intake was weakly inversely

associated with prostate cancer risk (P for trend = 0.11). Childhood dairy intake

was not associated with breast and stomach cancer risk; a positive association

with lung cancer risk was confounded by smoking behavior during adulthood.

CONCLUSIONS: A family diet rich in dairy products during childhood is associated

with a greater risk of colorectal cancer in adulthood. Confirmation of possible

underlying biological mechanisms is needed.


Food Nutr Res. 2016 Nov 22;60:32527.

Milk and dairy products: good or bad for human health? An assessment of the totality of scientific evidence.

Thorning TK, Raben A, Tholstrup T, Soedamah-Muthu SS, Givens I, Astrup A.
 

dd99

Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2014
Messages
434
Ecstatic, is that the formatting Ray used? If so, that settles it: Ray is Mittir.
 

ecstatichamster

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 21, 2015
Messages
9,059
Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Dec;16(12):2623-30.

Br J Nutr. 2007 Apr;97(4):611-6.
Comment in:
Br J Nutr. 2007 Apr;97(4):596-7.
Calcium intake and vitamin D metabolism and action, in healthy conditions and in
prostate cancer.
Bonjour JP, Chevalley T, Fardellone P.
Division of Bone Diseases (World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for
Osteoporosis Prevention), Department of Rehabilitation and Geriatrics, University
Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 14, Switzerland.
jean-philippe.bonjour@medecine.unige.ch
An association between Ca intake and the risk of prostate cancer has been
reported in some but not all epidemiological studies. Assuming that a
pathophysiological relationship would underlie this association, a favoured
hypothesis proposes that relatively high Ca consumption could promote prostate
cancer by reducing the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D;
calcitriol), the hormonal form of vitamin D. The present review analyses the
plausibility of this hypothesis by considering the quantitative relationships
linking Ca intake to 1,25(OH)2D production and action in healthy conditions and
in prostate cancer. Changes in the plasma level of 1,25(OH)2D in response to Ca
intake are of very small magnitude as compared with the variations required to
influence the proliferation and differentiation of prostate cancer cells. In most
studies, 1,25(OH)2D plasma level was not found to be reduced in patients with
prostate cancer. The possibility that the level of 1,25(OH)2D in prostate cells
is decreased with a high-Ca diet has not been documented. Furthermore, a recent
randomised placebo-controlled trial did not indicate that Ca supplementation
increases the relative risk of prostate cancer in men. In conclusion, the
existence of a pathophysiological link between relatively high Ca intake and
consequent low production and circulation level of 1,25(OH)2D that might promote
the development of prostate cancer in men remains so far an hypothesis, the
plausibility of which is not supported by the analysis of available clinical
data.

Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Dec 1;166(11):1270-9.
Calcium, dairy foods, and risk of incident and fatal prostate cancer: the
NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.
Park Y, Mitrou PN, Kipnis V, Hollenbeck A, Schatzkin A, Leitzmann MF.
Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics,
National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20852, USA. parkyik@mail.nih.gov
Calcium and dairy foods in relation to prostate cancer were examined in the
National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP (formerly known as the American
Association of Retired Persons) Diet and Health Study (1995/1996-2001). Diet was
assessed with a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Multivariate relative
risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox regression. During up to
6 years of follow-up (n = 293,888), the authors identified 10,180 total prostate
cancer cases (8,754 nonadvanced, 1,426 advanced, and 178 fatal cases). Total and
supplemental calcium were unrelated to total and nonadvanced prostate cancer.
However, a statistically nonsignificant positive association with total calcium
was observed for advanced (> or = 2,000 vs. 500-<750 mg/day: relative risk (RR) =
1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.91, 1.71; p(trend) = 0.06) and fatal (> or
= 1,000 vs. 500-<750 mg/day: RR = 1.39, 95% CI: 0.92, 2.09; p(trend) = 0.10)
prostate cancer. Skim milk, but not other dairy foods, was associated with
increased risk of advanced prostate cancer (> or = 2 vs. zero servings/day: RR =
1.23, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.54; p(trend) = 0.01). In contrast, calcium from nondairy
foods was associated with lower risk of nonadvanced prostate cancer (> or = 600
vs. < 250 mg/day: RR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.68, 0.99; p(trend) = 0.04). Although the
authors cannot definitively rule out a weak association for aggressive prostate
cancer, their findings do not provide strong support for the hypothesis that
calcium and dairy foods increase prostate cancer risk.

Cancer Causes Control. 2007 Feb;18(1):41-50.
Meat and dairy consumption and subsequent risk of prostate cancer in a US cohort
study.
Rohrmann S, Platz EA, Kavanaugh CJ, Thuita L, Hoffman SC, Helzlsouer KJ.
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615
N. Wolfe St., Rm. E 6138, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association of meat and dairy food consumption with
subsequent risk of prostate cancer. METHODS: In 1989, 3,892 men 35+ years old,
who participated in CLUE II study of Washington County, MD, completed an
abbreviated Block food frequency questionnaire. Intake of meat and dairy related
foods was calculated using consumption frequency and portion size. Incident
prostate cancer cases (n = 199) were ascertained through October 2004. Cox
proportional hazards regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) of total
and advanced (SEER states three and four; n = 54) prostate cancer and 95%
confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for age, BMI at age 21, and intake of energy,
saturated fat, and tomato products. RESULTS: Intakes of total mean (HR = 0.90,
95% CI 0.60-1.33, comparing highest to lowest tertile) and red meat (HR = 0.87,
95% CI 0.59-1.32) were not statistically significantly associated with prostate
cancer. However, processed meat consumption was associated with a
non-statistically significant higher risk of total (5+ vs. < or =1 servings/week:
HR = 2.24; 95% CI 0.90-5.59) prostate cancer. There was no association across
tertiles of dairy or calcium with total prostate cancer, although compared tp <
or =1 servings/week consumption of 5+ servings/week of dairy foods was associated
with an increased risk of prostate cancer (HR = 1.65, 98% CI 1.02-2.66).
CONCLUSION: Overall, consumption of processed meat, but not total meat or red
meat, was associated with a possible increased risk of total prostate cancer in
this prospective study. Higher intake of dairy foods but not calcium was
positively associated with prostate cancer. Further investigation into the
mechanisms by which processed meat and dairy consumption might increase the risk
of prostate cancer is suggested.

J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007 Mar;103(3-5):747-51.
Dietary calcium does not affect prostate tumor progression in LPB-Tag transgenic
mice.
Mordan-McCombs S, Brown T, Zinser G, Welsh J, Tenniswood M.
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 222 Galvin Life
Sciences Building, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA.
High dietary calcium has been shown in epidemiological studies to be a risk
factor for prostate cancer, and it has been postulated that this effect is
secondary to calcium induced modulation of the vitamin D axis. In this study, we
used LPB-Tag transgenic mice on the CD1 background to examine the impact of
dietary calcium on prostate tumor progression. CD1-LPB-Tag mice predictably
develop autochthonous, hormone-responsive prostate tumors by 3 months of age. Age
matched transgenic and non-transgenic littermates were weaned onto high (2%) or
low (0.2%) calcium diets and mice were sacrificed at 5, 7, and 9 weeks of age.
The entire urogenital complex was excised, weighed, and processed for histology.
There was no significant effect of dietary calcium on tumor weight or on the time
course of tumor progression, as monitored using a modified Gleason grade (MGS).
Serum calcium was maintained in the normal range in mice on the low and high
calcium diet throughout the study. Circulating 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) was elevated by
low dietary calcium in 5-week-old mice, but not in older animals. In summary,
neither development nor progression of prostate tumors in LPB-Tag mice was
accelerated by high dietary calcium.

Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Dec 1;166(11):1270-9.
Calcium, dairy foods, and risk of incident and fatal prostate cancer: the
NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.
Park Y, Mitrou PN, Kipnis V, Hollenbeck A, Schatzkin A, Leitzmann MF.
Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics,
National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20852, USA. parkyik@mail.nih.gov
Calcium and dairy foods in relation to prostate cancer were examined in the
National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP (formerly known as the American
Association of Retired Persons) Diet and Health Study (1995/1996-2001). Diet was
assessed with a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Multivariate relative
risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox regression. During up to
6 years of follow-up (n = 293,888), the authors identified 10,180 total prostate
cancer cases (8,754 nonadvanced, 1,426 advanced, and 178 fatal cases). Total and
supplemental calcium were unrelated to total and nonadvanced prostate cancer.
However, a statistically nonsignificant positive association with total calcium
was observed for advanced (> or = 2,000 vs. 500-<750 mg/day: relative risk (RR) =
1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.91, 1.71; p(trend) = 0.06) and fatal (> or
= 1,000 vs. 500-<750 mg/day: RR = 1.39, 95% CI: 0.92, 2.09; p(trend) = 0.10)
prostate cancer. Skim milk, but not other dairy foods, was associated with
increased risk of advanced prostate cancer (> or = 2 vs. zero servings/day: RR =
1.23, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.54; p(trend) = 0.01). In contrast, calcium from nondairy
foods was associated with lower risk of nonadvanced prostate cancer (> or = 600
vs. < 250 mg/day: RR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.68, 0.99; p(trend) = 0.04). Although the
authors cannot definitively rule out a weak association for aggressive prostate
cancer, their findings do not provide strong support for the hypothesis that
calcium and dairy foods increase prostate cancer risk.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Dec;16(12):2623-30.
Dairy products, calcium intake, and risk of prostate cancer in the prostate,
lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial.
Ahn J, Albanes D, Peters U, Schatzkin A, Lim U, Freedman M, Chatterjee N,
Andriole GL, Leitzmann MF, Hayes RB; Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian
Trial Project Team.
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH,
6120 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Ahnj@mail.nih.gov
Higher intakes of calcium and dairy products, a major source of dietary calcium,
are reported to increase the risk of prostate cancer, potentially due to
reductions in circulating vitamin D with increasing calcium intake. We
prospectively examined the association of dairy product and calcium intake with
prostate cancer risk in 29,509 men, including 1,910 cases, in the Prostate, Lung,
Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. We also evaluated the relation of
calcium intake with serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] and
1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D], in a Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and
Ovarian Trial substudy (n = 275). Dietary intake was assessed using a food
frequency questionnaire. Baseline serum 1,25(OH)(2)D was determined by RIA.
Greater intake of dairy products, particularly low-fat dairy products, was weakly
associated with increased risk of prostate cancer [relative risk (RR), 1.12; 95%
confidence intervals (CI), 0.97-1.30; P trend = 0.06 for >2.75 versus < or = 0.98
servings of total dairy/day; 1.23 (1.07-1.41) for low-fat dairy]. Greater dietary
calcium intake was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer (RR, 1.34;
95% CI, 0.93-1.94; P trend = 0.02 for >2,000 versus <1,000 mg/day), but greater
supplementary calcium intake was not associated with the risk. Associations of
dairy product and dietary calcium intake were evident for nonaggressive disease
(RR, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.99-1.46; P trend = 0.01 for dairy products; 1.64, 1.04-2.57;
P trend = 0.002 for dietary calcium), but not aggressive disease (RR, 1.02; 95%
CI, 0.81-1.28 for dairy products; 0.94, 0.49-1.80 for dietary calcium). Calcium
intake was not associated with serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D and 1,25(OH)(2)D
concentration. In this large prospective study in a prostate cancer screening
trial, greater dietary intake of calcium and dairy products, particularly low-fat
types, may be modestly associated with increased risks for nonaggressive prostate
cancer, but was unrelated to aggressive disease. Furthermore, we found no
relationship between calcium intake and circulating vitamin D.
Clinical Trial

Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Dec;86(6):1722-9.
Childhood dairy intake and adult cancer risk: 65-y follow-up of the Boyd Orr
cohort.
van der Pols JC, Bain C, Gunnell D, Smith GD, Frobisher C, Martin RM.
Longitudinal Studies Unit, Division of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, School
of Population Health, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
j.vanderpols@uq.edu.au
BACKGROUND: Dairy consumption affects biological pathways associated with
carcinogenesis. Evidence for a link between cancer risk and dairy consumption in
adulthood is increasing, but associations with childhood dairy consumption have
not been studied adequately. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether dairy consumption
in childhood is associated with cancer incidence and mortality in adulthood.
DESIGN: From 1937 through 1939, some 4,999 children living in England and
Scotland participated in a study of family food consumption, assessed from 7-d
household food inventories. The National Health Service central register was used
to ascertain cancer registrations and deaths between 1948 and 2005 in the 4,383
traced cohort members. Per capita household intake estimates for dairy products
and calcium were used as proxy for individual intake. RESULTS: During the
follow-up period, 770 cancer registrations or cancer deaths occurred. High
childhood total dairy intake was associated with a near-tripling in the odds of
colorectal cancer [multivariate odds ratio: 2.90 (95% CI: 1.26, 6.65); 2-sided P
for trend = 0.005] compared with low intake, independent of meat, fruit, and
vegetable intakes and socioeconomic indicators. Milk intake showed a similar
association with colorectal cancer risk. High milk intake was weakly inversely
associated with prostate cancer risk (P for trend = 0.11). Childhood dairy intake
was not associated with breast and stomach cancer risk; a positive association
with lung cancer risk was confounded by smoking behavior during adulthood.
CONCLUSIONS: A family diet rich in dairy products during childhood is associated
with a greater risk of colorectal cancer in adulthood. Confirmation of possible
underlying biological mechanisms is needed.

Food Nutr Res. 2016 Nov 22;60:32527.
Milk and dairy products: good or bad for human health? An assessment of the totality of scientific evidence.
Thorning TK, Raben A, Tholstrup T, Soedamah-Muthu SS, Givens I, Astrup A.
 

Parsifal

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2015
Messages
1,073
Nice,

And 1,25oh itself increases serum calcium,so maybe problem is not the calcium,but its effect on 1,25 levels.
That's funny, I always wake up at night with tooth pain if I take high doses of vitamin D3...
 

WestCoaster

Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2016
Messages
130
Location
Vancouver, BC
btw, several studies say the same thing, independently about calcium and prostate cancer.

I was thinking, low K2 levels are probably to blame but that is only speculation. Excess calcium without enough K2 can cause calcification of organs.

I'd say it's almost exclusively related to low K2 or inadequate K2. Far too much evidence out there now about the dangers of calcium and calcification without proper K2, or even taking Vitamin D without K2.
 

nad

Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2016
Messages
210
ecstatichamster
The fructose angle is interesting. It's hard to find objective studies about fructose.

Heard that fructose blocks Ca absorption. Also coffee - if it's surely blocks iron absorption then also Ca & others. (?)
 
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