1. Cocoa Butter - Organic & Fair Trade Certified
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. **NEW** BL11 - Orange, Red & Infrared Therapy Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Charcoal Soap - For Deep Cleansing
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Orange & Red Light Therapy Device - LGS1
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  5. Organic Cocoa Powder
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  6. Metabasoap - Handcrafted Soap
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  7. Cascara Sagrada Powder From Farmalabor In Italy
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  8. **NEW Mini Body Light** MBL1 - Orange & Red Light Therapy Mini Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice

Calcirol - Liquid Vitamin D3

Discussion in 'IdeaLabs' started by haidut, Dec 10, 2017.

  1. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2014
    Messages:
    6,220
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Uganda
  2. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2014
    Messages:
    6,220
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Uganda
    - Vitamin D in Health and Disease (tut)

    "Vitamin D functions in the body through both an endocrine mechanism (regulation of calcium absorption) and an autocrine mechanism (facilitation of gene expression). The former acts through circulating calcitriol, whereas the latter, which accounts for more than 80% of the metabolic utilization of the vitamin each day, produces, uses, and degrades calcitriol exclusively intracellularly. In patients with end-stage kidney disease, the endocrine mechanism is effectively disabled; however, the autocrine mechanism is able to function normally so long as the patient has adequate serum levels of 25(OH)D, on which its function is absolutely dependent. For this reason, calcitriol and its analogs do not constitute adequate replacement in managing vitamin D needs of such patients."

    Just for the sake of context:

    "Figure 1A illustrates the canonical scheme of vitamin D action that prevailed at the time when the most recent dietary intake recommendations for the vitamin were promulgated (1). In this scheme, vitamin D input to the body (whether cutaneous or oral) resulted in conversion to 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in the liver, with subsequent conversion of 25(OH)D to calcitriol [1,25(OH)2D] in the kidney. Calcitriol functioned as a hormone, circulating in the blood to stimulate the induction of various components of the calcium transport system in the intestinal mucosa. The net result was that active calcium absorption was increased and the efficiency of calcium absorption, normally low, was augmented so as to enable controlled adaptation to varying calcium intakes."

    upload_2019-7-20_20-3-42.png

    "This scheme remains correct, so far as it goes, but it is now understood that many tissues, particularly components of the immune apparatus and various epithelia, are able to express 1-Diokine-hydroxylase and to synthesize calcitriol locally, as depicted in Figure 1B. The upper right-hand branch represents the endocrine pathway, and the lower branch represents the autocrine pathway. There are three key features of the revised scheme: (1) The bulk of the daily metabolic utilization of vitamin D is by way of the peripheral, autocrine pathway; (2) among other effects, the autocrine action always results in expression of the 24-hydroxylase; as a result, locally synthesized calcitriol is degraded immediately after it acts, and, thus, no calcitriol enters the circulation; and (3) local concentrations of calcitriol required to support various tissue responses are higher than typical serum concentrations of calcitriol."

    "Without vitamin D, the ability of the cell to respond adequately to pathologic and physiologic signals is impaired. For example, the ductal epithelium of the breast requires vitamin D to mount an adequate response to cyclic variation in estrogen and progesterone (2). Also, macrophages use vitamin D to enable the synthesis of the bactericidal peptides needed to deal with bacterial invaders (3). In addition, most of the epithelial structures in the body, which turn over relatively rapidly, use vitamin D to signal the transcription of proteins that regulate cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis (4)."


    "There are several consequences of this revised understanding. Perhaps most important is that this scheme permits tissue-specific action of vitamin D (as contrasted with what would otherwise be near-universal activation if all tissues were directly responsive to circulating calcitriol concentrations). A second key insight is that the 1-Constatine-hydroxylase in the tissues concerned functions well below its kM (5); hence, the amount of calcitriol that it can produce locally depends on the availability of the precursor compound [i.e., 25(OH)D]. Thus, serum concentration of 25(OH)D becomes a critical factor in ensuring optimal functioning of the various systems that require vitamin D as a part of their signaling apparatus."

    "Until recently, it had been customary, in the management of ESRD [End-stage Renal Disease], to supplement patients with calcitriol or one of its analogs—a logical move, given that renal synthesis of calcitriol in such patients is effectively knocked out. The resulting serum concentrations of calcitriol, however, are generally too low to enable the autocrine functions of the vitamin. Also, because of the short biologic half-life of calcitriol, serum calcitriol concentrations in such patients tend to be low most of the time. Finally, replacing calcitriol increases metabolic clearance of 25(OH)D (6) and certainly does nothing to support normal serum levels of this key metabolite. Thus, calcitriol is not a replacement for vitamin D and, at best, functions solely as a poor replacement for its endocrine function."

    "The inadequacy of calcitriol as a substitute for vitamin D itself is further emphasized by three lines of evidence indicating that even the canonical function of vitamin D (facilitation of calcium absorption) cannot be achieved by calcitriol alone. (1) Without doubt, calcitriol is the principal regulator of calcium absorption in typical adults, but it has been recognized for many years that those with frank vitamin D deficiency (e.g., adults with osteomalacia) exhibit calcium malabsorption, despite frequently normal to high-normal levels of circulating calcitriol. This defect is corrected not by giving more calcitriol but by raising serum levels of 25(OH)D. (2) Furthermore, 25(OH)D, administered as such, has been shown to elevate calcium absorption efficiency in typical adults, and it does so without elevating serum calcitriol levels (7). (3) Despite high parenteral dosages of calcitriol (e.g., 2 μg intravenously three times per week), calcium absorption efficiency remains severely depressed in patients who have ESRD and are on renal dialysis (R. Lund, personal communication). A working conclusion is that the optimal regulation of calcium absorption requires both molecules [25(OH)D and calcitriol]. How 25(OH)D is functioning in this setting is unclear, but it may be through binding to membrane vitamin D receptors (8) that, in turn, open calcium channels in the enterocyte and thereby facilitate the transfer of calcium across the cell."


    "There is a large body of epidemiologic data showing an inverse association between incident cancer risk and antecedently measured serum 25(OH)D (26 –29). This evidence has been accumulated for such cancers as prostate, colon, breast, lung, and marrow/lymphoma, among others. Risk reduction for breast cancer, for example, is reported to be as much as 70% for the top quartile of serum 25(OH)D (75 nmol/L) relative to the bottom quartile (45 nmol/L) (29). Furthermore, there is an even larger body of animal data showing that vitamin D deficiency in experimental systems predisposes to development of cancer on exposure to typical carcinogens (30,31). This has been shown both for animals with knockout of the vitamin D receptor and for animals with induced, nutritional vitamin D deficiency. Capping these lines of evidence is a recent randomized, controlled trial of postmenopausal women showing substantial reduction in all-cancer risk, amounting to from 60 to 75%, over the course of a 4-yr study (32). Figure 4 presents the Kaplan-Meier survival curves free of cancer for individuals from that study."

    upload_2019-7-20_20-5-9.png
     
  3. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2014
    Messages:
    6,220
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Uganda
  4. baccheion

    baccheion Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2017
    Messages:
    896
    Gender:
    Male
    I don't remember.

    Best way to personalize is to check levels via lab work. That is, take a certain amount of K2 MK-4 (follow the ratio above) with D3, then check once serum 25(OH)D has stabilized. The vitamin K test essentially measures percent carboxylated osteocalcin, something exactly relevant in this case.
     
  5. Mauritio

    Mauritio Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2018
    Messages:
    705
    Gender:
    Male
    What can I do if I get brain fog and low drive to do stuff ,which might be higher bran serotonin ,but still want to use Calcirol/ Vitamin -D to get my levels up ?
     
  6. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2014
    Messages:
    6,220
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Uganda
Loading...