Caffeine May Reduce Gut Serotonin Secretion

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Nov 7, 2013.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    The study is on gut serotonin secretion inhibition by adenosine receptor antagonists, and caffeine is a pretty potent one at that. The study also specifically talks about how that would benefit disease like IBD and Chron's:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22038827

    So, Peat may have been on to something with his 50 cups of coffee per day:):
     
  2. aquaman

    aquaman Member

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    Interesting.

    Coffee drops my body temp and increases pulse though :(

    went off it for a week and slept I'd guess 25% better - needed a bit less sleep and felt better in general, much easier to drop off to sleep instead of feeling wired around 10.30pm-midnight (this is only from ONE cup of double espresso in the morning).

    Shame, it tastes so good but I feel much better without it. And yes, with lots of cream/milk/sugar, and only post-meals, it still has same effect. Also I notice my post nasal drip gets much worse, and if I drink it after eggs, I sometimes get sick.
     
  3. Evandrojr

    Evandrojr Member

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    Hi. Came across this study and for a little concerned: Chronic caffeine alters the density of adenosine, adrenergic, cholinergic, GABA, and serotonin receptors and calcium channels in mouse brain. - PubMed - NCBI

    If I understood correctly, chronic caffeine consumption could cause an increase in serotonin receptors, in turn cousin our bodies to produce more serotonin? @haidut , any comment please? Thanks :)
     
  4. What-a-Riot

    What-a-Riot Member

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    He addressed this in another thread saying that it indicates that caffeine antagonizes serotonin, and also that increased serotonin sensitivity and lower total serotonin is preferable to increased serotonin production and total levels to compensate for what the body may perceive as a serotonin deficiency

    EDIT
    Can't find that off hand, but hopefully he'll chime in when he gets a chance, I just meant to try to tide you over til then anyway
     
  5. Evandrojr

    Evandrojr Member

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    Thanks a lot, Riot-a, but from I got got from the study (and I could be wrong), is that because the density of te serotonin receptors are increased, that would induce further production of serotonin (which would more closely resemble a resistance than a sensitivity). This guys sums it up in an easier manner to comprehend: Coffee and hormones: Here's how coffee really affects your health. | Precision Nutrition

    Oh boy, I love my coffee so much, I'm scared!!
     
  6. What-a-Riot

    What-a-Riot Member

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    Yeah it's something I wonder about too, but honestly I wouldn't give up caffeine based on that. I feel like for the most part modern society demands or at least expects its people to undergo a degree of chronic sleep deprivation, and I think maintaining adenosine sensitivity is a key component of long term protective inhibition. That's my view anyway
     
  7. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    The study your refer to also lists the adenosine and GABA receptors among others. Caffeine is a well-known adenosine and GABA antagonist, and both receptor types increased in density. So, by the same logic, and actually as established clinically, antagonist will usually increase receptor density while agonists will decrease it. I do not see anywhere in the study discussion that the increased receptor density lead to increased serotonin production. Serotonin production does not depend on receptors and their density, it is driven by availability of the amino acid tryptophan and expression of the TPH-family of enzymes. And btw, caffeine can also inhibit TPH in some cases, so this means even less serotonin. Finally, adenosine antagonism leads to increase in dopamine synthesis, and dopamine is a potent TPH inhibitor. So, caffeine has many mechanisms through it can achieve lower serotonin levels and thus adaptive increase in receptor density.
     
  8. General Orange

    General Orange Member

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    Adenosine is an important modulator of inflammation and its anti-inflammatory effects have been well established in humans as well as in animal models. High extracellular adenosine suppresses and resolves chronic inflammation in IBD models. High extracellular adenosine levels could be achieved by enhanced adenosine absorption and increased de novo synthesis. Increased adenosine concentration leads to activation of the A2a receptor on the cell surface of immune and epithelial cells that would be a potential therapeutic target for chronic intestinal inflammation. Adenosine is transported via concentrative nucleoside transporter and equilibrative nucleoside transporter transporters that are localized in apical and basolateral membranes of intestinal epithelial cells, respectively. Increased extracellular adenosine levels activate the A2a receptor, which would reduce cytokines responsible for chronic inflammation.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2751993/

    So caffeine as an antagonist to adenosine will interfere with IBS healing
     
  9. General Orange

    General Orange Member

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    Caffeine has been found to interfere with binding of GABA to GABA receptors, preventing the neurotransmitter from performing its calming function. (Ribeiro, J.A. and Sebastiao, A.M. 2010), (Utley, 1992)

    In cases of IBS, ulcerative colitis, and other lower digestive disorders in which the lower GI tract is already irritated and often hyperactive, the lack of GABA’s calming effect further exacerbates the problem. In addition to the direct effect on the GI tract, GABA’s role in stress management is also compromised in the presence of caffeine. This is significant because psychological stress is known to be a contributing factor in IBS. (Babb, 1984) (Rocca, D. J., et al, 1998)
     
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