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Caffeine Is A Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitor

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Apr 21, 2014.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    Another point for caffeine, even though the reported effectiveness is weak. I always wondered why I seemed to get similar effects on breathing (shallower and more efficient) form caffeine and acetazolamide.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21612376

    "...Caffeine and piperine were extracted and tested for inhibition of the human (h) cytosolic isoforms hCA I and II. The IC(50) values of caffeine against hCA I was of 55 mM, whereas that of piperine of 60 mM. The IC(50) values of caffeine and piperine against hCA II were of 2 mM. Although these are quite weak inhibitors they may constitute leads for developing tighter binding compounds."

    It is probably worth a try to do a brown bag breathing after caffeine ingestion, or combine caffeine with acetazolamide, or pomegranate. Pomegaranate has several compounds that are quite potent carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonic_a ... _inhibitor

    "...Ellagitannins extracted from the pericarps of Punica granatum, the pomegranate, such as punicalin, punicalagin, granatin B, gallagyldilactone, casuarinin, pedunculagin and tellimagrandin I, are highly active carbonic anhydrase inhibitors."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8220326
     
  2. aguilaroja

    aguilaroja Member

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    Interesting.

    I have steered away from pomegranates after reading Dr.Peat, since the seeds ares so plentiful. I have never juiced them myself but when I have seen them juiced, it seems some of the seed material gets mixed in.

    I am ignorant about the safety and utility of Ellagitannins, and the helpfulness beyond the hype about pomegranates. I wonder if the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor effect of caffeine is part of the known diuretic effect of coffee.
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    The good news is that the pericarp is not the seeds, so pomegranate juice should have those compounds in abundance. That may explain the anti-cancer effect attributed to pomegranate.
    As far as caffeine - I think I did see a study saying that said caffeine is a diuretic b/c it speeds up the metabolism of sugar and anything that lowers blood sugar acts like a duiretic.
     
  4. aguilaroja

    aguilaroja Member

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    Despite the "common" "knowledge" that caffeine is a diuretic, the "mechanism" and "context" of its diuretic actions do not seem to be well characterized. There's conjecture about caffeine being chronically "dehydrating" which does not seem to hold up to scrutiny. There are observations, for instance, about the adenosine effect (including the methylxanthine influence) on the kidney, and on the kidney via the liver.

    I have not seen the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor function of caffeine mentioned in the caffeine diuretic discussions. A mild widespread increase in tissue CO2 availability itself will have numerous effects. As an aspiring Peat student, it seems that restorative agents have wide contexts whose functions get unhelpfully reduced in "scientific" discussions. So aspirin, for instance, becomes a "non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug", and, by the way, a quaint old one.

    Preaching to the choir here, excuse me.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21076499
    Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2010 Nov;88(11):1115-21. doi: 10.1139/y10-090.
    Caffeine-induced natriuresis and diuresis via blockade of hepatic adenosine-mediated sensory nerves and a hepatorenal reflex. Ming Z1, Lautt WW.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20859805
    Handb Exp Pharmacol. 2011;(200):391-412. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-13443-2_15.
    Methylxanthines and the kidney. Osswald H1, Schnermann J.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20693584
    Indian J Med Res. 2010 Jul;132:11-3.
    Myth buster: caffeine does not exhibit a diuretic effect during exercise performance.
    Greer F.Comment on
    • Effects of acute supplementation of caffeine on cardiorespiratory responses during endurance running in a hot & humid climate. [Indian J Med Res. 2010]

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/559762_2
    Caffeine, Fluid-Electrolyte Balance, Temperature Regulation, and Exercise-Heat Tolerance
    Lawrence E. Armstrong, Douglas J. Casa, Carl M. Maresh, Matthew S. Ganio
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2007;35(3):135-140. 
     
  5. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    this enzyme carbonic anhydrase converts co2 to bicarbonate.and ray recommends baking soda to increase co2, if i remember correctly.

    also there is other people who recommend baking soda for cancer.

    how it can increase co2 level in body , are co2 and bicarbonate interchangeable?! or maybe baking soda downregulates carbonic anhydrase and spares co2?!
     
  6. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I think baking soda neutralizes lactic acid, which allows for more CO2 to be formed. The sodium in it also has pro-metabolic effects.
     
  7. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    Alkalinity vs Acidity 2012, KMUD : The Herb Doctors
    Anyone has idea on whats the mechanism of converdion of bicarbonate to co2?
     
  8. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    When you take baking soda and increase alkalinity of blood beyond normal range, your kidneys release some of it in urine, in the same time it release some hydrogen ions into blood stream. Bicarbonates absorb the hydrogen to form carbonic acid.

    At least one mechanism for baking soda being converted to co2 is this.

    But I don't know if ray has this mechanism or other one I his mind when he did above quote.

    --------

    Another mechanism simply is that bicarbonate lowers breathing rate because of high ph in blood, hence retaining more co2.
     
  9. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    ------------------

    And also there is Equilibrium law , there is a maximum solubility of co2 as carbonic acid, when you ingesting bicarbonates the carbonic acid loss its tendency to lose hydrogen and form bicarbonate, so you have carbonic acid dissolved in blood ,which prevents co2 from dissolving in blood.

    --------

    Another mechanism for increasing co2, according to this,
    Absorption of Bicarbonate Ions in the Duodenum and Jejunum - Medical Physiology
     
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