Broda Barnes Quotes

Discussion in 'Resources' started by charlie, Oct 30, 2013.

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  1. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Referring to basal temp:
     
  2. OP
    charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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  3. Ahanu

    Ahanu Member

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    Bit confused about basal temp. I always read 98.6 as the normal?
     
  4. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    He meant upon waking.

    After eating and activity it rises from there.
     
  5. Ahanu

    Ahanu Member

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    Ok. Thank you. So the basal heart rate will also be less?! Are there any quotes Form Barnes?
     
  6. Tarmander

    Tarmander Member

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    Nice quotes Charlie. Just what I was looking for
     
  7. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    as soon as the patient awakens in the morning after a good night's sleep, the thermometer is placed snugly in the armpit for 10 minutes. The normal range is 97.8 to 98.2.

    corrected, thanks Charlie!
     
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    charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Quoted for typo.

    97.8 to 98.2.
     
  9. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    I've tried to find studies documenting this, without success.
    It's also a known fact Japaneses have half or less heart attacks than the Western norms, despite their high intake of omega3 from fish.

    Maybe the green tea protects them ?
     
  10. aguilaroja

    aguilaroja Member

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    The discussion by Dr. Barnes is found in the book, ""Heart Attack Rareness in Thyroid-Treated Patients" by Broda O. Barnes and Charlotte W. Barnes, Charles C. Thomas publisher, 1972. I doubt this book sold much even back in the day, and it is not found readily these days. I have excerpted a section about the Bantu research below. (The discussion about Austrian findings is much longer.)

    The referenced article is:
    Becker, D.J.P.: Cardio-vascular disease in the Bantu and coloured races of South Africa. S Afr J Med Sci, 11:1-14, 1946.

    Two other references listed in the Barnes book are:

    19. Higginson, J. and Pepler, W.J.: Fat intake, serum cholesterol concentration and atherosclerosis in South African Bantu. Part II. Athereosclerosis and coronary artery disease. J. clin. Invest. 33: 1366-1371, 1954.
    20. Laurie, W., Woods, J.D. and Roach, G. Cornary heart disease in the South African Bantu. Am J. Cardiol, 5:48-49, 1960.

    There is a 1964 article by Meyer, Pepler and others (Circulation. 1964; 29: 415-421) that draws different conclusions from Barnes. In fairness, there is no strong reason that Barnes would have easily found this article in the 1970's, since journal searches were much more labor intensive then, lacking computer index & search functions. The link to the free article is:
    http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/29/3/415.long

    Incidentally, Weston Price also observed the Bantu. I don't have his book at hand, but excerpted an article by Enig and Fallon describing Price's findings below.

    There is much to be admired about Dr. Barnes's work. He appears to have influenced Dr. Peat's thinking about PUFA. I am not saying that every Barnes conjecture was accurate, but he helped many people. He trained as a scientist as well as a clinician, and was willing to take unfashionable positions based on evidence.

    --
    From Broda Barnes, "Heart Attack Rareness in Thyroid-Treated Patients", 1972, p. 31:

    "In 1945, Becker (18) reported 3,000 consecutive autopsies on the Bantu of South Africa covering the years 1924-1938. He found only 6 cases of heart attacks, which sounds like a very low incidence. it was his work that stimulated a tremendous aount of effort seeking the secret of the Bantu. A critical examination of his data at the time would have prevented a waste of scientific manpower and axpayer's money. "

    "In the first place, 25 percent of the deaths were due to tuberculosis. This is a higher incidence than that found in the United States one hundred years ago when no heart attackes were recognized or reported. It has been mentioned above that tuberculosis kills the young adults. This would materially reduce the age of the adult population, and Becker's data reflect this. Among the 3,000 autopsies, only 352 cases had reached the age of 50 years. Six heart attacks in a population of 352 potential candidates are quite different frorm 6 in 3,000 autopsies. It seems more plausible that it was elimination of patients susceptible to infectious diesases (other infections were as numerous as tuberculosis in the Bantu) that was responsible for the low incidence of heart attacks rather than a low cholesterol diet."
    --

    http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topi ... an-tribes/
    "Nowhere in his travels had Price yet found groups that had no cavities at all, yet among the cattle-herding tribes of Africa, Dr. Price found six tribes that were completely free of dental decay. Furthermore, all members of these tribes exhibited straight, uncrowded teeth.
    Largely vegetarian Bantu tribes such as the Kikuyu and Wakamba were agriculturists. Their diet consisted of sweet potatoes, corn, beans, bananas, millet and Kafir corn or sorghum. They were less robust than their meat-eating neighbors, and tended to be dominated by them. Price found that vegetarian groups had some tooth decay-usually around 5% or 6% of all teeth, still small numbers compared to Whites living off store-bought foods. Even among these largely vegetarian tribes, however, dental occlusions were rare, as were degenerative diseases.
    "Many investigators have mistakenly claimed that Bantu groups consumed no animal products at all. Some tribes kept a few cattle and goats which supplied both milk and meat; they ate small animals such as frogs; and they put a high value on insect food. “The natives of Africa know that certain insects are very rich in special food values at certain seasons, also that their eggs are valuable foods. A fly that hatches in enormous quantities in Lake Victoria is gathered and used fresh and dried for storage. They also use ant eggs and ants.”3 Other insects, such as bees, wasps, beetles, butterflies, moths, cricket, dragon flies and termites are sought out and consumed with relish by tribes throughout Africa.4 These insects are rich in the fat soluble factors found in blood, organ meats, fish and butterfat. It is significant that the vegetarian groups practiced the feeding of special foods during gestation and lactation. Apparently carnivorous groups found no need to supplement the diet, as it was already rich in the factors needed for reproduction and optimum growth."
     
  11. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    was that video of Broda Barnes ?

    its not on youtube anymore!
     
  12. OP
    charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Yes.
     
  13. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    If remember the tittle of video, please.so I can find it on YouTube.
     
  14. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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  15. Kartoffel

    Kartoffel Member

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    I love his explanation for why so many people are hypo, and why hypothyroidism is inherited. "The lows marries low."
     
  16. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    There are interviews with Alberto, but in hungarianese and without options for subtitles.
     
  17. Kartoffel

    Kartoffel Member

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    Why is it taking Zeus so long to translate them?!
     
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