Bored Of White Rice

Discussion in 'Starches, Fiber, Legumes' started by Cirion, Jul 18, 2019.

  1. Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    Any other good safe starch option besides potatoes? I've been thinking of learning how to bake my own bread from safe (unbleached) flour and maybe trying that. Bread does sound a lot more interesting than rice at this point lol. Plus home made bread would have a lot of B vitamins and none of the weird/bad added stuff that most store bought bread has.

    I also realize white rice is not the greatest at adding nutrients, so I can't help but think replacing it w/ bread is going to be largely beneficial.
     
  2. LuMonty

    LuMonty Member

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    If you can get quality flour I don't see why not. I've been making my own bread for a decade and it's definitely better than white rice if digestion is in order. Would you be using a dairy-free recipe? I find that bread made without butter and/or milk is as satiating both macro-wise and flavor-wise. If you'd like, I can give you the recipe I use.
     
  3. raysputin

    raysputin Member

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    i would think einkorn bread would be safe
     
  4. Vinny

    Vinny Member

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    Quinoa, buckwheat...?
     
  5. Runenight201

    Runenight201 Member

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    PASTA

    Safe starch be damned pasta makes me feel gooood!!!
     
  6. OP
    Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    Yeah, that sounds good to me. I probably would want a bread recipe that is dairy free yeah. The simpler, the better. The simplest would probably be just flour, yeast, salt, sugar right?

    I am thinking also of using brewer's or nutritional yeast. Would these be healthier than the packets of yeast you find in stores?

    I've tried the quinoa/brown rice pasta that you can buy but I didn't like them, they seemed to bloat me pretty badly and lower my temps also.
     
  7. mrchibbs

    mrchibbs Member

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    Sourdough bread for sure. The classic kind with white bread flour is as easy to digest as white rice or well cooked potatoes.

    Ray has said that he was a bread maker in college and found he could eat an entire loaf of sourdough without any issues, as the sourdough and the slow-leavened process degrades the problematic proteins, making it as safe as white rice.

    To me, white rice cooked in broth, sourdough bread with butter and potatoes with salt and butter are the safest choices since they've been eaten by our ancestors for centuries.
     
  8. Dannywharton

    Dannywharton Member

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    Cool - do you have a source for this Ray quote about the bread? I find sourdough or rye sourdough a really satiating carb, sometimes I crave it. I just worry the bloating I sometimes experience is from the bread, as apparently gluten can take days to cause issues.
     
  9. LuMonty

    LuMonty Member

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    I haven't used yeast besides the regular stuff. The bread I've had with brewer's yeast has a nice beer-like flavor, but I don't know if the recipe would need to be changed. I'm also not sure what nutritional content survives the baking process. Due to the high content of selenium in brewer's yeast, I wouldn't personally use it over regular yeast since I'd be eating the bread regularly. We always avoided nutritional yeast because of it's high amount of niacin and the usual flushing it causes. I had to remember to rewrite this several times because it was written as useful to me and not someone who's just starting out so it took me a bit.

    White Bread recipe for 2 loaves (halve for making one; with a large oven, you could theoretically double this if you could thoroughly knead that much dough)
    2 loaf pans, 9"x 5"
    1 package yeast (or 2 1/4 teaspoon; I don't like the quick rise stuff)
    2 1/4 cup warm water (if the dough gets to dry, you can add more, say a tablespoon at a time)
    1-3 tablespoons of sugar (I use 2; as you get better at making the bread you can fine-tune this; more sugar=more yeast activity and more dough babysitting)
    1 tablespoon salt (You can adjust this by taste but more than 1 Tbsp overpowers the other flavors in my experience)
    2 tablespoons of preferred fat (I've found coconut oil to make the bread burn easily)*
    6+ cups of flour (to start, this is never exact; depending on the weather I've used up to 8 cups!)

    *Ghee is something I want to try because it has a high flashpoint and very little of the milk proteins. In your case, any other higher flash-point oil should work and prevent burning. This will be the toughest part for you to get right as you practice because most high flashpoint oils are PUFA. I have no shame in saying I've destroyed several loaves as I learned. Bread made without fat will get stale quickly, typically have weaker structure, and lack flavor.

    Take your water and warm it up to 110 degrees farenheit, up to 115. Any warmer kills the yeast. Add the yeast to the water. Soon, it should start bubbling. If it doesn't bubble within in 2 minutes, throw it all out and start over. Once it starts bubbling, move the mixture to a large bowl and add the sugar. This should cause even more bubbling. If it doesn't the yeast is probably mostly bad and should be thrown out because the bubbling indicates the strength of the yeast. Add the sugar and fat, if used, of choice. Start adding flour. If it's in your price range, a dough whisk** is good for mixing in a large bowl. Continue adding flour, making sure not to leave clumps unmixed. They won't cook and will ruin part of the bread. Once hand mixing becomes difficult, flour your bench and turn out your dough onto that area. Knead the dough*** while adding flour. To see if the dough is done, it should be smooth-feeling and not sticky. Also, pinching it should result in an almost full rebound. Add more flour to your bench as you go, otherwise the dough will stick and tear, and end up incomplete.

    Once your dough is complete, leave it in a large bowl or bread bucket where it has room to rise. For a bowl or bucket without a lid, leaving a tea towel over it helps to quicken this. Once the volume has doubled, punch the dough down (i.e. get rid of the gas bubbles in some fashion). Let double again.

    Preheat oven to 375 farenheit. Divide your dough in half (a scale helps). Flour or oil your bench (which should have been cleaned in the meantime). Flatten each half into approximately square shapes. Then, roll a bit of dough inward and pinch it down, forming a seal and getting rid of air bubbles. Repeat until you have a log-like shape free of air bubbles. Leftover air will cause pockets while baking which can cause spill-over and pressure in the pan making getting the loaf out difficult. Turn in the ends so it fits your loaf pans. Bake for 30 minutes. To tell if they're done, take one from the oven and thump the bottom. It should sound hollow. I recommend thick towels or a good oven mitt. It takes practice. If it doesn't sound hollow, cook for 5 more minutes. Larger loaves will take longer, but a 45 minute cook time should happen with the pan size in this recipe.

    It's very important that you let the bread cool for 45-60 minutes. Extra loaves can be wrapped up and frozen.****

    ** a dough whisk with the inner loop sticking outward seems the best. My dad and I made hundreds of loaves over several years with an "inner-inner-loop" whisk an with an "inner-outer loop" like so: [​IMG]
    The loop style pictured makes it easier to mix with and give the dough a better texture. Either way, a regular whisk will break easily and going by hand at that stage is very messy and hard to get right.

    *** proper kneading technique is difficult to explain. Stretching the gluten enough to build it without toughening is the goal. It's sort of like holding the close part of the dough with one hand while pulling away with the other. Then push down and away. Proper technique is much easier on the body and produces much better bread.

    ****frozen bread keeps for months. I recall one summer day I made 8 loaves and the next day my dad made 10. The downside is plastic double-wrapped is the only method that lasts that long and has its own set of issues.
     
  10. mrchibbs

    mrchibbs Member

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    No, I heard him say it on KMUD. I don't know which interview, but he's said it a couple times, even on One Radio Network. There's no doubt sourdough is the best approach, there's a reason why it was the traditional way of making bread.
    The commercial approach of fast leavened breads have little in common with the old techniques.

    The gluten is degraded, and Ray also said that gluten becomes a problem when stressed. So my guess is if you eat a couple slices of sourdough bread with organic butter during a meal with family and friends and you're relaxed, there's going to be very few problems with it.
     
  11. OP
    Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    Turns out nutritional yeast doesn't let bread rise so I decided to find something to start that was even simpler/no yeast needed. I ended up making soda bread:

    Greek Yogurt Soda Bread - Cookies & Carrot Sticks

    I used regular yogurt instead of greek (nonfat) which is much less in protein and also much less tryptophan, king arthur unbleached flour, and I also did not use baking powder (mostly because I didn't have it lol), and didn't use all the other stuff like oatmeal or any of the seeds. I also added nutritional yeast. Despite the fact I'd never made bread before and I didn't follow the ingredients, it actually turned out OK, but not sweet enough, but which I quickly solved by dipping each piece of bread in maple syrup (suprisingly good when I did that too, fixed all the flavor problems). It probably would have tasted decent with some butter also, but I'm trying not to eat much fat nowadays.

    I used an electric mixer (to be honest, can't be bothered to do all that manual labor lol) which had both mixer and even kneader attachments on it, so I did all the kneading using that, which seemed to work well enough.
     
  12. LuMonty

    LuMonty Member

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    Depending on how adventurous you feel, you can try adding maple syrup to the dough itself (I've used honey before). You know, I always wondered why my parents were adding regular yeast to the "new yeast" which was the nutritional stuff. I"ve been lied to lol. Sounds like your laziness paid off, nice work! :thumbup:
     
  13. somuch4food

    somuch4food Member

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    Bread dipped in maple syrup is awesome! I like it especially as a late night snack.
     
  14. ken

    ken Member

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    you should try 24 hr no knead bread recipe. Stir flour salt yeast add some water. let it sit for a day. recipes all over internet.
    No-Knead Bread Recipe
     
  15. milkboi

    milkboi Member

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    Are there differences in PUFA content between different kinds of white flour?
     
  16. ShotTrue

    ShotTrue Member

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    Eating sourdough from a local bakery right now. I know from Nathan Hatch's book he has like a gluten intolerance and makes his own bread some certain way.
    You could try cooking rice with coconut milk, or seasoning it /cooking it with different ways like Asian fried rice.
     
  17. schultz

    schultz Member

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    I like making tortillas with masa harina flour. 2 cups of masa harina to 1.5 cups water (so 260g masa harina to 375g water) plus a tsp or so of salt.
    Split it into 8 or so balls and roll each ball into a tortilla shape then cook them on a non-stick pan. They need to be rolled out quite thin and it takes a bit of skill to roll them transfer to the pan without breaking them. I can't find plain masa harina tortillas in Canada so I have to make them myself if I want them.

    Sometimes I cut the tortillas into 8 triangle pieces and deepfry them in coconut oil to make nachos. So the 8 tortillas would make 64 nachos I suppose... Just an occassional treat. I have kids so I like to make and enjoy fun foods with my family.
     
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