Book Ideas

Discussion in 'Book Recommendations' started by DaveFoster, Oct 24, 2016.

  1. DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    I'm working on my book, which features aspirin, dosing, biochemical features, and a lot of the interactions and widespread protective effects it has according to the scientific literature.

    I enjoy writing the book just for its own sake; I find the topic interesting.

    What book would you purchase?

    Either now, or in the past, what is something you're interested in or have been interested in, would like to know more about (or did in the past), or a problem that's taken you a long time to resolve (but could have been resolved if you knew the correct information.)

    What is something important to you that you're still working on that you would like to resolve?

    I'm trying to identify if my time spent is actually going to provide value to people, and I'd like to spend it where it's needed most.
     
  2. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    Stellar guru,
    It would be cool to address misconceptions, real concerns, possible downsides, frequency for prevention, frequency used in disease, tips for purifying from tablets (there are many cool videos on Youtube), comments on the different forms that you can find it (convenients and inconvenients of each one), tips regarding use, simplified technical information (not in a reductive way, but in an understandable way), storage, steps from ingestion to excretion, unusual applications, natural sources (with comparison and all that), desirable and undesirable interactions with nutrients (but also compounds/enzymes inside the body), topical uses, a bit of its history, prudent doses, how much is too little for a significant beneficial effect and how much might be too much, and mainly how it interacts with Makroskygenase.

    Since I suppose that it's going to be an eBook, and this is just an opinion, but I find it easier when the references are simply numbered (it interferes less with the flow of reading), and you can create links directly from the numbers to the studies, instead of directing the person to the references, requiring that they try to find on their own. References at the end of the chapters, regardless of that.
     
  3. OP
    DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    Thanks so much for the input, fellow Peatard. I'm putting numbered footnotes, and I think it's a good idea to put references in the back of the book. like you suggested. Thanks for mentioning hyperlinks within the footnotes; that really helps actually and seems palatable.

    Rather than making a book about aspirin in and of itself, (although I would find it interesting,) I think people who actually choose to buy and read the information if it had a purpose to it. Say: aspirin as a novel cure for depression, low energy levels, "adrenal fatigue," mental as well as physical pain, etc. As far as a niche, I think framing aspirin as a mental pain-killer (as in a remedy to mental suffering) would be an interesting idea. We think of it as a remedy for physical pain as opposed to a tool against emotional/mental suffering. Any thoughts?
     
  4. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    You can use PubMeb (This et al. 2008; is et al. 1999) as a model for the way that it sets (terrible, 2002) its references, very convenient.
    You can also find many people advocating aspirin masks for acne (I forgot to mention, and there are many videos on Youtube too).

    Aspirin: beyond a pain killa. would make a good title.. :ss

    If possible, remember to live while you write it, and no matter what, keep tarmandering!
     
  5. lollipop

    lollipop Guest

    I would buy it not only for myself, but ALL of my friends, family, clients.

    I second @Amazoniac's thoughts and suggestions...
     
  6. Bahaa El wazzan

    Bahaa El wazzan Member

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    I'm very interested

    I would buy the aspirin one
     
  7. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    Although he doesn't cite aspirin, this quote was for me the most encouraging when it comes to its use for prevention (and one of its misconceptions is already addressed there):

    Multiple sclerosis, protein, fats, and progesterone
    "Everyone agrees that the immune system is involved in MS in some way, but that's really where the problem starts, because of the idea that inflammation is an intrinsic part of immunity. If "inflammation is necessary and good," then it becomes a problem to define exactly where the boundary is between an appropriate reaction and a degenerative process. Edema, reduced cellular respiration, loss of normal functions, fibrosis in its various degrees, each component of inflammation can be seen in a good light, as part of a "defensive immune reaction." When tissue injury leads to repair, it "must" be seen as beneficial, even if it leads to the formation of a scar in place of functional tissue, because the comparison is between an imagined worst possible outcome, and an imperfect recovery, rather than comparing the inflammatory process with the possibility that a potentially noxious agent might have done no harm at all."

    Endotoxin is a good example of something that elicits inflammation without necessarily causing a direct harm.

    "Peatard", I'm not aware of any kind word that ends with "ard", but at least we're making some progress. You never sympathized with me, right?
     
  8. OP
    DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    Thank you Lisa; that means a lot. And I've copied and pasted everything by Amazoniac.

    Awesome; thanks Bahaa.

    He does propose aspirin as a potential treatment for MS. I like that quote; it really dismisses the idea of a "healthful" degree of disease. All spectrums of disease are non-optimal; no inflammation is "good."
     
  9. GAF

    GAF Member

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    Exactly how does aspirin prevent cancer etc

    And,

    aspirin hurts your stomach - the real facts and who was behind the lie

    And

    Aspirin vs tylenol - how tylenol contributes to the austism adhd etc epidemic in children while aspirin prevents ...
     
  10. James_001

    James_001 Member

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    I would buy anything related to sleep/libido and ray peat's ideas.

    Or like some sort of general men's health book (like peats nutrition for women book)
     
  11. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    Regeneration and degeneration:
    "Fifty years ago, inflammation was seen as a necessary part of the healing process, but now it is recognized as a cause of heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and aging itself. During the development of the organism, the nature of healing changes, as the nature of inflammation changes. Early in life, healing is regenerative or restorative, and there is little inflammation. In adulthood as the amount of inflammation increases, healing fails to completely restore lost structures and functions, resulting in scarring, the replacement of functional tissue with fibrous tissue. Identifiable changes in the nature of inflammation under different conditions can explain some of these losses of healing capacity. Factors that limit inflammation and fibrosis, while permitting tissue remodeling, could facilitate regeneration and retard aging."
     
  12. OP
    DaveFoster

    DaveFoster Member

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    I will definitely go into more detail on those. All good ideas, thanks!
    I'll definitely include a chapter on sleep and libido. The book should apply equally to men and women, I think, but there will definitely be a chapter on ergogenics, how to increase performance enhancement with supplementation and diet. It's going to be a much larger project than I thought.
    Nice, I'll read through that article. There's so much information to go through it's insane.

    I have a couple questions for the community:

    - Do you guys think simplistic language (eg. sugar instead of glucose; cancer instead of tumor; stroke instead of ischemia; heart attack instead of cardiovascular event) would be more approachable? I'm thinking yes.
    - The organization of the book will be as follows:

    0) Acknowledgements
    1) A chapter dedicated to each topic and how it relates to inflammation/metabolism/aspirin (eg. CH 1: Cancer; CH 2: Heart disease; CH 3: Mental health/neurological; CH 4: Gastrointestinal, etc.)
    2) A sub-chapter dedicated to different conditions (eg. CH 1, Lung Cancer; CH 1, Colorectal cancer, etc.)
    3) Chapters on safety and alternatives to aspirin/troubleshooting
    4) Dosing instructions with references from each study.
    5) References will go at the end of the book.

    - Would you guys like to see more information as to the mechanisms, or mainly to the evidence behind each effect? If both, the book will be extremely long; obviously there will be a little of both, but I'm thinking more of the latter since there's so much ground to cover with introductions to each biological system, etc. I will be laying the groundwork (what is oxidative phosphorylation in simple terms, what does it mean for health, etc.)

    Let me know what you guys think!
     
  13. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    My opinion is that simplifying should be an intent, so that everything that you write reflects that intent and you don't need to overthink which words are more appropriate/suitable.
    Diagrams in general are more confusing than explanatory. :ss
    Again, just an opinion, but you don't need to worry about the book being long if you separate which parts are more detailed for those that are interested.
    http://chrismasterjohnphd.com/2016/12/09/the-ultimate-vitamin-k2-resource/

    If you google "supercentenarian aspirin", some relevant results appear that you might be interested in including just out of curiosity.
     
  14. lollipop

    lollipop Guest

    Hi @DaveFoster

    I love the direction. Length does not scare me away. Many editors make a mistake with these kinds of books and edit out 3/4 of the amazing information.

    Another way to increase/include the data within a book is through appendages. I would consider including what you have or also writing a volume 2 and having it ready. I am sure people will want all of the information.

    It makes sense to use familiar words over technical ones. I would write a forward with the more technically accurate terms explaining that going forward you will use the more familiar terms.

    I disagree a bit with Amazonian in that charts, tables, graphs and illustrations can be amazing and break up long technical text. Problem is most people do a horrible job with them. Make good, simple and attractive ones and they can be a huge bonus.

    Hope this helps.
     
  15. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    -
    The problem with diagrams is that they are usually a combination of texts and images; but to be able to do that and avoid an excess of information, both tend to be insufficient.
    If you had to use them, it's often a sign that the text (or the illustration) was not clear enough. It's usually a maze with crossing arrows, filled with intermediate steps that often lead to more confusion.
    Using Ray's books an example, he never resorted to diagrams to explain things as far as I know, and his texts tend to be very clear and dense.

    But I did not say that it's always like that or those other things you mentioned can't be useful..
     
  16. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    Dave, a few more random suggestions, however consider them with some disdain, otherwise if you listen to everyone's opinion you might become paralyzed or at least it might rob your style.

    First chapter of a book should be to discuss how pboy is so talented. This is not optional, this is an obligation.
    I would move that first part to the end of the book, because there's way more value in discussing why and when inflammation occurs and why it might be reasonable to try to suppress it, but also when it might not be desirable to do so. Basically answering: why should I care?
    Then, the main part discussing the effects of aspirin.
    Take Ray's article on aspirin for example, the first thing that he does is to briefly answer that question; then he gives a bit of a background of the drug for some context; only then he starts to discuss what aspirin is "Aspirin is an antioxidant.."; its effects (the core of the article); then he slowly interpolates* the conditions and the effects; then what synergizes and interferes with aspirin; and a conclusion.

    Try to search for common doubts about antiinflammatory drugs (forums, leaflets, etc).
    Consider studies with negative outcomes.

    People are not interested in references, people are interested on the information, because the references they can find for themselves based on the information that you provided (of course that it helps if you also provide them).
    I know you admire ZeuI mean, haidut, and the only time that he offered a lot of references was to mock people that criticized that he didn't back up his claims enough previously. It's a good example.

    In my opinion, devoting a chapter to each specific condition (#2 of your list) is a bit unnecessary if you lay out a solid justification, because it's the same principle applied for different locations/manifestations, perhaps an appendix for each of them would suffice. It's a bit of a poor administration of content to address each one (#2) separately, let's say that someone decides to read your book only to find out later that just a few chapters discussed their specific condition/interest, it's disappointing.

    You can send the book to a few people before releasing it.

    As you know, people are fed up of bull**** and are usually more receptive when you don't mince words, mostly because everyone can instantly pick your intention: if you're trying to shove studies on them; *if you're trying to appear knowledgeable (c) Tay Lopez (didn't you feel a bit aversed and turned off by that?); if you're trying to appear funny, you know, just like when you roll your eyes on every post of mine: that's exactly what I mean. So being straightforward and honest is usually how people respond best and identify the most. Have you considered creating this book as if your name wasn't going to be on it?
     
  17. lollipop

    lollipop Guest

    @Amazoniac why don't you write a book? You actually have some great foundations...
     
  18. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    Because my spine is not yet distorted enough to write something unique.
    Regarding foundations, it's simple, keep asking yourself: what would pboy do? Fog disappears, path appears..
     
  19. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    Hi, David. I didn't know it was going to be a biography.

    By the way, where's lisa?
     
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