1. Cocoa Butter - Organic & Fair Trade Certified
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. **NEW** BL11 - Orange, Red & Infrared Therapy Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Charcoal Soap - For Deep Cleansing
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Orange & Red Light Therapy Device - LGS1
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  5. Organic Cocoa Powder
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  6. Metabasoap - Handcrafted Soap
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  7. Cascara Sagrada Powder From Farmalabor In Italy
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice
  8. **NEW Mini Body Light** MBL1 - Orange & Red Light Therapy Mini Body Light
    CLICK HERE!
    Dismiss Notice

Bone Regulates Glucose Metabolism As An Endocrine Organ Through Osteocalcin

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by paymanz, Dec 1, 2016.

  1. paymanz

    paymanz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    Messages:
    2,617
    Gender:
    Male
    Bone Regulates Glucose Metabolism as an Endocrine Organ through Osteocalcin. - PubMed - NCBI

    Skeleton was considered as a dynamic connective tissue, which was essential for mobility, calcium homeostasis, and hematopoietic niche. However more and more evidences indicate that skeleton works not only as a structural scaffold but also as an endocrine organ, which regulates several metabolic processes. Besides osteoprotegerin (OPG), sclerostin (SOST), and Dickopf (DKK) which play essential roles in bone formation, modelling, remodelling, and homeostasis, bone can also secret hormones, such as osteocalcin (OCN), which promotes proliferation of β cells, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity. Additionally OCN can also regulate the fat cells and male gonad endocrine activity and be regulated by insulin and the neural system. In summary, skeleton has endocrine function via OCN and plays an important role in energy metabolism, especially in glucose metabolism.

    Comment on “Bone Regulates Glucose Metabolism as an Endocrine Organ through Osteocalcin”

    While reading the insightful review of Shao et al. [1] on the effect of osteocalcin (OC) on glucose homeostasis, we came across a few lacunas which we want to fill up so as to generalise the osteocalcin concept. Firstly, Shao et al. reported that the concentration of uncarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC) is controlled by decarboxylation of carboxylated osteocalcin (cOC), which is not true; it has been reported in the literature that during the bone resorption process initially a small fraction of intact OC is released in the acidic environment created by osteoclasts, which undergoes enzymatic proteolysis and subsequently excretion of OC fragments in urine. In the same research, researchers also prove that incubation of cOC in simulated osteoclastic lacuna medium (pH 4.8, 37°C) for 48 hours did not result in decarboxylation process and it requires heating of cOC at 110°C for 3 hours in HCl (50 mmol/L) to cause its decarboxylation [2]. Clearly, such conditions are not available in a physiological environment; therefore, the concept of decarboxylation from our point of view requires further investigation. Secondly, it is still a questionable fact that impairment in OC (any form) levels causes disturbance in glucose homeostasis because hyperglycemia, both in vitro [3] and clinically [4], is reported to cause impaired osteoblastic activity too. Therefore, whether OC imbalance causes impaired glucose homeostasis or vice versa is a matter of research. Thirdly, if as mentioned by Shao et al. ucOC is the only active form of OC, then supplementation of Vitamin K or various antiresorptive therapies (raloxifene, alendronate, and strontium) should theoretically increase risk of Type 2 Diabetes because they decrease the level of circulating OC (ucOC) but it is not the case [59]; rather, they are reported to decrease the risk of Type 2 Diabetes. Therefore, which form of osteocalcin is responsible for benefit in glucose homeostasis is not clear till now. Moreover, the presence of γ-glutamate carboxylase has been reported on osteoblasts [10], absence of which results in impaired glucose homeostasis, clearly indicating the protective role of Vitamin K (cofactor of γ-glutamate carboxylase) in maintaining glucose balance. Lastly, Shao et al. did not list the major difference in OC physiology in mice and humans, while extrapolating the benefits; for example, mice have three genes for OC while humans have only one gene and Vitamin D3 downregulates the OC expression in mice while it causes the opposite in humans [11, 12]. We appreciate the work of Shao et al., for their efforts to compile such a controversial topic, and we are looking forward to further research on this topic.
     
  2. Jon

    Jon Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2017
    Messages:
    543
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Colorado
    A couple questions just to clarify my layman brain's understanding of what these reports are showing:

    1) so we still don't understand whether carboxylated or undercarboxylated OC is responsible for glucose utilization?

    2) we don't really even know how OC becomes undercarboxylated?

    3) we need vitamin k to synergize with y-glutamate carboxylase for it to influence glucose metabolism? Which indicates y-GC may really be the integral piece for insulin sensitivity?
     
  3. OP
    paymanz

    paymanz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    Messages:
    2,617
    Gender:
    Male
    1) from what i understand both of them help glucose metabolism.

    from OP that i bolded:" ...Thirdly, if as mentioned by Shao et al. ucOC is the only active form of OC, then supplementation of Vitamin K or various antiresorptive therapies (raloxifene, alendronate, and strontium) should theoretically increase risk of Type 2 Diabetes because they decrease the level of circulating OC (ucOC) but it is not the case [59]; rather, they are reported to decrease the risk of Type 2 Diabetes...."

    2) again to my knowledge , undercarboxylated OC is a marker of vit k deficiency.
     
Loading...