Blue Light Exposure Just Twice A Day Causes Insulin Resistance In Humans

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, May 27, 2016.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    No need to elaborate, given how much Ray has written about red and blue light and their effects on metabolism. The key result from the study was that just 3 hours of exposure was enough to trigger that metabolic dysfunction. Imagine what happens at night when there is ambient blue light everywhere, including coming through the window from the streets. Of course, I don't even have to mention the 8-10 hours 5 days a week that every working person has to endure under the soul-sucking office fluorescent (blue) lights.

    Morning and Evening Blue-Enriched Light Exposure Alters Metabolic Function in Normal Weight Adults

    "...Increasing evidence points to associations between light-dark exposure patterns, feeding behavior, and metabolism. This study aimed to determine the acute effects of 3 hours of morning versus evening blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light on hunger, metabolic function, and physiological arousal. Nineteen healthy adults completed this 4-day inpatient protocol under dim light conditions (<20lux). Participants were randomized to 3 hours of blue-enriched light exposure on Day 3 starting either 0.5 hours after wake (n = 9; morning group) or 10.5 hours after wake (n = 10; evening group). All participants remained in dim light on Day 2 to serve as their baseline. Subjective hunger and sleepiness scales were collected hourly. Blood was sampled at 30-minute intervals for 4 hours in association with the light exposure period for glucose, insulin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR and cortisol were calculated. Comparisons relative to baseline were done using t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs. In both the morning and evening groups, insulin total area, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-IR AUC were increased and subjective sleepiness was reduced with blue-enriched light compared to dim light. The evening group, but not the morning group, had significantly higher glucose peak value during blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light. There were no other significant differences between the morning or the evening groups in response to blue-enriched light exposure. Blue-enriched light exposure acutely alters glucose metabolism and sleepiness, however the mechanisms behind this relationship and its impacts on hunger and appetite regulation remain unclear. These results provide further support for a role of environmental light exposure in the regulation of metabolism.
     
  2. Kasper

    Kasper Member

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    Does that maybe mean that staring to a computer screen for hours in the day is problematic? I read that computer screens contain a lot of blue light.

    Also, I wonder, the sun also contains a lot of blue light wavelengths, but maybe it is not problematic as it comes with red light as well?

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  3. Tarmander

    Tarmander Member

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    Hmm. The question in my mind, is this blue light as absorbed through the retina? Or through the skin?
     
  4. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    other than f.lux i changed windows color and firefox theme to red and it seems good at least on my eye and especially at nights.

    nice study ,thanks haidut:)
     
  5. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    If you are on Linux I suggest Redshift.
     
  6. CoolTweetPete

    CoolTweetPete Member

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    Peat has written about the effect of red light potentially protecting from exposure to blue light.

    Maybe using a red light (like from Red Light Man) would be a good idea when working under fluorescents (like now :???:)
     
  7. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    i also turned off all gamma rays of my monitor, that one should be done on monitors settings i think.
     
  8. Kray

    Kray Member

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  9. Hitoshi

    Hitoshi Member

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    sunlight is full spectrum and follows a batural diurnal rhythm both in rise and set as well as the frequencies that make it to you depending on its angle of inclination. morning contains most blue, evening more red. ever seen a blue or white sunset?
     
  10. Parsifal

    Parsifal Member

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    There is also Gamma Panel that is really more powerful than f.lux.
     
  11. Gascon

    Gascon Member

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    Is "exposure" related to eye contact, or any part of the body ?
     
  12. zelda_the_brain

    zelda_the_brain Member

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    I'm confused about what is "blue-light" and what is not. Is it blue-light if it just looks blue? And does using a red filter really help? Blue light from the sun or from fluorescent light doesn't look blue, so how can I tell when I'm being exposed to it? If using a red filter on the phone or computer helps, shouldn't one be used all the time?
     
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