Blocking Endotoxin (TLR4) Can Prevent Pre-term Birth

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Nov 7, 2016.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    The number of so-called preemies has been steadily rising over the last 2 decades. The official explanation is that the cause is unknown, but the only officially approved treatment is progesterone. This study sheds a bit more light and claims that endotoxin is behind the majority of cases of pre-term births. Activation of the TLR4 receptor is the specific mechanism through which endotoxin wreaks havoc and apparently blocking the TLR4 receptor provides full protection. Interestingly, the study also mentioned that other potent activators of TLR4 are physical injury and stress. Alcohol/ethanol is also a very potent TLR4 agonist.
    I posted some studies on TLR antagonists like vitamin D, A, B2, etc and the Wikipedia page has some pharma drugs with the same activity. One of them is (+)naloxone and that is the drug used in the study below. So, for the people who suspect they may be at risk increasing vitamin D intake may be a good alternative to the pharma drugs even though (+)naloxone seemed to be without any long term side effects.

    http://www.healthcanal.com/pregnanc...ws-promise-for-preventing-pre-term-birth.html

    "...The main causes of pre-term birth are bacterial infection (in around 50% of cases), physical injury or stress causing placental damage, carrying twins or triplets, or from environmental toxins such as air pollution. Each of these is associated with what researchers describe as an "inflammatory cascade", which can activate the mother’s immune response and ultimately lead to spontaneous pre-term birth. This inflammatory cascade is triggered by an immune receptor known as Toll-Like receptor 4 (TLR4), responding to infection, physical injury or stress. TLR4 is critical to the body's immune response but it also produces a number of pro-inflammatory effects that are harmful to pregnancy. "TLR4 is a trigger of spontaneous pre-term birth," Professor Robertson says. "For this reason, we wanted to test a drug known for its ability to block the actions of TLR4, to see if that would also prevent pre-term birth." The drug tested in this study is known as (+)-naloxone (pronounced: PLUS nal-OX-own). "We found that by treating pregnant mice with (+)-naloxone, it provided complete protection against pre-term birth triggered by bacteria. It also protected against stillbirth and infant death shortly after birth, and led to a correction in birth weight among infants that would otherwise be born at very low birth weight," Professor Robertson says. "The babies born to mothers treated with (+)-naloxone developed normally and were mostly indistinguishable from those born to the control group."
     
  2. Soren

    Soren Member

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    I've found this post whilst researching the method of action for Suboxone specifically the ingredient Naloxone to see if there are potentially other substances that have the same action as Naloxone. Naloxone is one of the ingredients that is used in Suboxone the other ingredient is Buprenorphine.

    The official line is that the naloxone is meant to prevent the addiction to opioids by blocking the opioids effects but this can cause withdrawal symptoms. Also that is used to counteract overdose of opioids.

    "Narcan (naloxone) is an opioid antagonist used for the complete or partial reversal of opioid overdose, including respiratory depression. Narcan is also used for diagnosis of suspected or known acute opioid overdose and also for blood pressure support in septic shock. " Common Side Effects of Narcan (Naloxone Hydrochloride Injection) Drug Center - RxList

    Is it reasonable to assume that along with TLR4 antagonism that Naloxone exerts some of its benefits via opposition to serotonin and as such serotonin antagonists such as Cyproheptadine would make a viable alternative?
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I think naltrexone is safer than naloxone and is also a TLR4 antagonist. Peat has been mentioning it to people for ages in regards to "addiction" problems, gut issues, cancer, diabetes, etc. Cyproheptadine, ketotifen, mianserin, amitriptyline and other chemicals with similar structure are all TLR4 antagonists as well. I think even Benadryl blocks TLR4.
     
  4. Soren

    Soren Member

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    Thanks Haidut.
     
  5. Lyall

    Lyall Member

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    But those drugs listed would not be safe in pregnancy?
     
  6. LucyL

    LucyL Member

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    Low dose Naltrexone has been used during pregnancy, here is a presentation Low Dose Naltrexone in Pregnancy looks like from an irish fertility specialist.

    My youngest was born a month early (spent a week in NICU) and they had no idea why, but 3 years later I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I'm betting on an endotoxin connection, also a known low-vit D status.
     
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