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Blocking Blue Light Can Cure Bipolar Disorder

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Jul 27, 2016.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    This is another great study for so many reasons. First, it adds to the evidence that bipolar disorder is probably environmental in origin, possibly linked to blue light pollution. Second, it adds to the evidence for a link between high cortisol / serotonin and bipolar disorder as blue light strongly stimulates cortisol and serotonin release. Third, it suggests that for many people treating this condition officially labelled as "incurable" may be as simple as wearing orange-tinted glasses at night or sleeping in a room with orange/amber light filters attached to the window glass. And combining this with a little methylene blue, which is also known to treat bipolar disorder in humans, will probably provide the one-two punch needed to break the vicious cycle.
    Finally, the study further strengthens the case for these conditions being metabolic in origin given that light's primary purpose in mammals is controlling metabolism and dopamine synthesis.

    Blue-blocking glasses may help treat bipolar disorder, promote sleep

    "...In a small Norwegian study of 23 people hospitalized for bipolar disorder, scientists assigned 12 to wear “blue-blocking” amber glasses for one week, and 11 not to. Meanwhile, no changes were made to the patient’s medications. The paper found an enormous difference between the two groups. Those wearing the amber-tinted glasses for only one week scored on average 14 points lower on a test used to measure mania known as the Young Mania Rating Scale. That’s more than twice what doctors consider to be a “clinically significant difference” and is a “remarkably high effect size,” according to a commentary accompanying the study, both of which were published in the journal Bipolar Disorders. Improvements were noticeable after only three nights of wearing the sunglasses. “I was surprised by the magnitude of changes and the rapid onset of improvement,” says study first author Tone Henriksen, a researcher with the University of Bergen and Valen Hospital in Norway. Even drug treatments aren’t typically known to lead to such quick and significant turnarounds, she adds. These are “knock-your-socks off results,” says Dr. James Phelps, a researcher and psychiatrist with Samaritan Health Services in Corvallis, Oregon, who wasn’t involved in the study. It's incredibly important to find new treatments as 20 percent of people with bipolar disorder commit suicide, the highest rate for any mental illness, he adds."

    "...In 2009 study in Chronobiology International, Phelps and a colleague found that 50 percent of 20 bipolar patients experiencing insomnia had significant improvements in sleep after wearing blue-blocking glasses. The majority of those who responded showed not just small but dramatic improvements. Other studies have shown that exposing bipolar patients to actual darkness during the nighttime can have similar results; one 2005 paper found that putting 16 bipolar patients in darkened rooms for 14 hours per day greatly improved their manic symptoms. But actual darkness is much more difficult to obtain, and more disruptive to life. Studies have also shown that light can act as an antidepressant. One study in JAMA Psychiatry in January found that subjecting patients to bright light therapy was as effective at improving (unipolar) depression as the antidepressant fluoxetine, but with fewer side effects. And exposure to light can also help prevent the depressive phase of bipolar disorder, says Francesco Benedetti, a psychiatrist at San Raffaele Hospital in Milan uninvolved in the present study."
     
  2. Elchapchapchapo

    Elchapchapchapo Member

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    Anyone have recommendations for blue blocking sunglasse$?

    I heard from guy who created swannie glasses most glasses that are blue blockers don't actually block the blue light and are just cheap glasses.

    Wondering if anyone can confirm this to be true?
     
  3. Elchapchapchapo

    Elchapchapchapo Member

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    dfspcc20 Member

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    dd99 Member

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    Blossom Moderator

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    ecstatichamster Member

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  8. Velve921

    Velve921 Member

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    I have been using Blue Blocker Sunglasses for 1.5 years now. I wear them for 30 minutes before bed time and in the middle of the night if I wake up. Specifically I wear them when watching my iPad; I enjoy watching something funny before bed time. I find I get the best of pre bed time comedy without as much of the detriments because I wear the glasses. During 2-3am wakefulness I'll eat something sugary/salty while watching something for 30 minutes with Blue Blockers; works well!

    If I wear them during the day sometimes they can be overly relaxing and I'll have to take them off while driving.
     
  9. Thoushant

    Thoushant Member

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    Any minimum amounts blocked needed?
    I've found ordinary glasses with a tint, but they block 25% 400-495nm light.
     
  10. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I recall listening to David Olszewski talking about sunlight and how much Vitamin D we get through our eyes. I forgot the exact number but my faint recollection is that the eyes produce 90% and our skin just 10% from sun exposure. Which is why I don't use sunglasses anymore. I may have to squint and I may look less cool. I also wonder about how good the sunglass filters are. I have no way of telling if they filter off harmful UV A rays and let beneficial UV B rays through. UV B light is what makes our body produce Vitamin D. Not knowing that, I would be afraid to use sunglasses that let UVA rays through and block out UVB. For me, not wearing sunglasses would be a safe choice.

    However, indoors, it would be safe to use sunglasses that filter off blue light- to deal with bipolar disorder.

    David Olszewski - About Light - It's Rainmaking Time!®
     
  11. conhnore

    conhnore Member

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    Blue-blocking glasses as additive treatment for mania: a randomized placebo-controlled trial - Henriksen - 2016 - Bipolar Disorders - Wiley Online Library

    bummer! lord knows that aspirin would be a confound tho' :cigar:

    wow!
     
  12. Dopamine

    Dopamine Member

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    Has anyone with bipolar tried this yet?
     
  13. BenjaminBullock

    BenjaminBullock Member

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    I drive at night using UVEX ones, Its much better experience.
     
  14. moringa

    moringa Member

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    Do you think himalayan salt lamps emit harmful blue light and other harmful light?

    What light bulb is the safest to use after sunset? (do you have a link?)
     
  15. achillea

    achillea Member

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  16. moringa

    moringa Member

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  17. Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    Interesting... my ex was bipolar and I bet she would have called me crazy for suggesting something like this, but I wouldn't be surprised if this worked. It's true there's a lot about the mind/brain we don't understand, but at the end of the day, the brain is still a physical entity, and so it makes sense that it can be "fixed" like any other physical entity, using physical means. It's worth noting that she worked the night shift so was exposed to a lot of artificial light at weird hours, and almost never got natural sunlight, and she didn't get bipolar "triggered" until a lot of stressors at college/first night shift job. I think chronic stressors in general can often be a trigger for a mental disorder (and in fact, that's what psychologists say often trigger bipolar in the first place, a big amount of either accumulated stress or a single very stressful event). Too much artificial lighting and too little sunlight, along with too little sleep, too little food (her metabolism was so bad, she was at a healthy weight but ate like a bird, and ALWAYS got cold, had to keep the room at 80+ degrees to be comfortable) and a flipped circadian cycle can certainly do that.
     
  18. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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  19. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I am not familiar with those lights but regular red bulbs should be fine. There is an ad at the top of the thread for red lights and those seem to get good reviews.
     
  20. Greg says

    Greg says Member

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