Bioproduction Of Conjugated Linoleic Acid By Probiotic Bacteria Occurs In Vitro And In Vivo In Mice

paymanz

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Bioproduction of Conjugated Linoleic Acid by Probiotic Bacteria Occurs In Vitro and In Vivo in Mice


Probiotics have been shown to reduce the incidence of colon cancer in animal models. The mechanisms responsible for this activity are poorly defined. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are a group of isomers of linoleic acid (LA) possessing anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties, which can be produced from LA by certain bacterial strains. In this study, the ability of probiotic bacteria to exert anticarcinogenic effects through the production of CLA was assessed. Incubation of probiotic bacteria (VSL3, Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. casei, L. plantarum, Bifidobacterium breve, B. infantis, B. longum, and Streptococcus thermophilus) in the presence of LA yielded CLA production as measured by gas chromatography. Conditioned medium, containing probiotic-produced CLA, reduced viability and induced apoptosis of HT-29 and Caco-2 cells, as assessed by MTT assay and DNA laddering, respectively. Western blotting demonstrated an increased expression of PPARγ in cells treated with conditioned medium compared with LA alone. Incubation of murine feces with LA after administering VSL3 yielded 100-fold more CLA than feces collected prior to VSL3 feeding. This study supports a role for supplemental probiotics as a strategy both for attenuating inflammation and for preventing colon cancer.



it is a big percentage of LA converted to CLA.

it is not well absorbed as the site of conversion is colon:
In vivo, CLA in the colon is likely unabsorbed and is thus unlikely to have similar deleterious effects

and also authors point to the fact that various isomers of CLA also form during fermentation and some of them may not be so healthy.
 

paymanz

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sorry i have to add this paragraph and it totally devoid this study's value!

from study:
The amount of linoleic acid available for CLA production in the colon would vary and is dependant upon the amount ingested and the efficacy of absorption in the small intestine. However, studies have shown that humans generally excrete ∼20 mg of linoleic acid/d (48), suggesting that substrate is available for microbial production of CLA. Although additional LA could be made available to the colon for increased CLA production via increased dietary intake, high levels of n-6 fatty acids have been shown to promote chemically induced carcinogenesis (49). Thus, increasing LA intake is not recommended at this time
 

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